Author Topic: Podcast Topic suggestions  (Read 54308 times)

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Offline wormguy

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #525 on: November 30, 2015, 07:09:56 PM »
Second only to the Ignobels, this is my favourite science competition of the year.  Please consider covering it briefly! 

http://news.sciencemag.org/people-events/2015/11/announcing-2015-dance-your-ph-d-winner

Cheers,
Brian @ Cal Poly

Offline tornadotj

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #526 on: December 16, 2015, 04:23:45 PM »
This video is making the rounds again. I have listened to every single podcast and I am pretty sure he and his theory have never been discussed. I'd love to hear this as the subject of a podcast.

http://geraldschroeder.com/wordpress/?page_id=211

Offline Alex K

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #527 on: December 18, 2015, 02:23:36 PM »
If you guys haven't put it in the latest issue already, here is a nice piece of gossip from CERN.
There are LHC hints for a new particle which are keeping everyone in the particle physics community excited right now:

http://sguforums.com/index.php/topic,45797.0.html

A relatively technical discussion can be found here

http://resonaances.blogspot.de/2015/12/a-new-boson-at-750-gev.html

but I have worked on similar things myself and am happy to answer questions.

Offline AndrewzC

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #528 on: December 31, 2015, 04:45:07 AM »
A general suggestion regarding discussion on the podcast - I'd like to hear more discussion about what motivates people to believe unsubstantiated and irrational claims. For example, homeopathy is - rightly - often featured on the SGU as belief in its efficacy is entirely irrational (even though some might perceive benefits due to the placebo effect). However there are clearly reasons that many resort to homeopathy and other alternative cures. For example, I imagine that in countries like the USA where the costs of medical care are high and only basic care is available for the uninsured many turn to alternative medicine simply out of desperation.

To my mind, the best way to combat irrational thinking is to understand the psychology involved - what motivates people to hold irrational beliefs? What needs do they think are met? - and so on. The contortions which our minds are able to put themselves through in order to maintain irrational beliefs are, of course, well known. My favourite wikipedia page lists many of them - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases - and could itself form the basis of a new recurring topic on the podcast when it's decided to introduce one.

Just a few thoughts. I'm a huge fan of the podcast. Of the many to which I subscribe (I'm a registered podcast addict), SGU is the one I most look forward to arriving every week.  Everyone makes great contributions but Steven in particular is to be congratulated for the huge amount of effort and thought he puts into producing the podcast along with everything else in his very busy life!

Very best wishes to everyone for a Happy New Year.

Offline galexioza

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #529 on: January 13, 2016, 08:27:18 PM »
Happy New Year to everyone.

I'm not sure if you have seen this, or if it has already been discussed on the SGU, as I haven't been able to listen to the podcast for the last few months (my formerly podcast-filled commute now features a toddler demanding music). However, I did a search of the forums, and couldn't find anything, so here it is.

The University of Wollongong in Australia, a university currently ranked 243 worldwide, has recently awarded a PhD to Judy Wilyman, a prominent anti-vaccination activist who runs the website Vaccination Decisions (vaccinationdecisions.net). The title of the PhD thesis is 'A critical analysis of the Australian government’s rationale for its vaccination policy' and it can be downloaded here: http://ro.uow.edu.au/theses/4541/.

The conclusions of the thesis are basically that vaccines have not been proven to be safe or effective and that the WHO is in the pocket of the pharmaceutical industries and the World Bank. I must admit, I haven't read the whole thing, but there's a good write-up about it here: http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2016/01/13/the-university-of-wollongong-issues-a-phd-in-antivaccine-pseudoscience/

The degree was awarded by the School of Humanities and Social Inquiry, which means scientific rigour was not a pre-requisite, but there still should have been some serious questions raised by the University of Wollongong. The danger now is that she will be Dr Wilyman, making her sound like a medical professional to those unwilling to dig any deeper and therefore giving her message more validity.

Offline pdeboer

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #530 on: January 21, 2016, 09:18:39 AM »
Google explains how they are preventing natural health products ad scamming and other type of phishing and scam ads.

https://googleblog.blogspot.ca/2016/01/better-ads-report.html

Paul

Offline J. Eastgate

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #531 on: January 25, 2016, 02:32:21 AM »
More trouble with forensic science:

Article: D.C. Court of Appeals judge faults overstated forensic gun-match claims
From: Washington Post
Date: January 22, 2016

Quote
Claims that forensic experts can match a bullet or shell casing found at a crime scene to a specific weapon lack a scientific basis and should be barred from criminal trials as misleading, a D.C. Court of Appeals judge wrote this week.

The opinion, by Associate Judge Catharine Easterly, is not binding on criminal prosecutions in D.C. Superior Court, where firearms and ballistics evidence have been introduced in scores of violent felony cases in recent years. But it continues a nationwide push for heightened scrutiny of forensic techniques and testimony relied upon in thousands of criminal convictions.

Forensic, "science," could make for a good episode topic.  I'm behind on my episodes but if you guys didn't cover the FBI's hair analysis being decades of bunkum and false convictions, that'd be a good tie-in, too.
Every soup ladled to the hungry, every blanket draped over the cold signifies, in the final sense, a theft from my gigantic paycheck.

Online SkeptiQueer

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #532 on: January 25, 2016, 03:37:48 AM »
More trouble with forensic science:

Article: D.C. Court of Appeals judge faults overstated forensic gun-match claims
From: Washington Post
Date: January 22, 2016

Quote
Claims that forensic experts can match a bullet or shell casing found at a crime scene to a specific weapon lack a scientific basis and should be barred from criminal trials as misleading, a D.C. Court of Appeals judge wrote this week.

The opinion, by Associate Judge Catharine Easterly, is not binding on criminal prosecutions in D.C. Superior Court, where firearms and ballistics evidence have been introduced in scores of violent felony cases in recent years. But it continues a nationwide push for heightened scrutiny of forensic techniques and testimony relied upon in thousands of criminal convictions.

Forensic, "science," could make for a good episode topic.  I'm behind on my episodes but if you guys didn't cover the FBI's hair analysis being decades of bunkum and false convictions, that'd be a good tie-in, too.
I would love a good deep dive on the "forensic science" stuff. I'd be happy to write a primer on forensic ballistics and why it's bullshit if they decide to do it.
"I don't believe you!" James Randi

Online werecow

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #533 on: January 25, 2016, 06:56:15 AM »
More trouble with forensic science:

Article: D.C. Court of Appeals judge faults overstated forensic gun-match claims
From: Washington Post
Date: January 22, 2016

Quote
Claims that forensic experts can match a bullet or shell casing found at a crime scene to a specific weapon lack a scientific basis and should be barred from criminal trials as misleading, a D.C. Court of Appeals judge wrote this week.

The opinion, by Associate Judge Catharine Easterly, is not binding on criminal prosecutions in D.C. Superior Court, where firearms and ballistics evidence have been introduced in scores of violent felony cases in recent years. But it continues a nationwide push for heightened scrutiny of forensic techniques and testimony relied upon in thousands of criminal convictions.

Forensic, "science," could make for a good episode topic.  I'm behind on my episodes but if you guys didn't cover the FBI's hair analysis being decades of bunkum and false convictions, that'd be a good tie-in, too.
I would love a good deep dive on the "forensic science" stuff. I'd be happy to write a primer on forensic ballistics and why it's bullshit if they decide to do it.

You mean the great mouse detective got it wrong? }|:oo



Seriously, though, that would be interesting.

Offline Catzilla2332

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Re: Podcast Topic suggestions
« Reply #534 on: January 27, 2016, 12:14:11 AM »
I noted a post on Facebook that 22,000 nurses who refused to get the flu vaccine,were in danger of loosing their jobs.  I replied that: It's probably a bad idea for people who work with immune compromised people to expose them to the flu.  Perhaps if they signed a waver to the effect that if any person under their care died from the flu, they could be charged with manslaughter?   

 

personate-rain