Author Topic: Exposing PseudoAstronomy Podcast 161: Water on Earth: Coriolis and Tides  (Read 49790 times)

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Offline astrostu

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Hi all!  After thinking about doing this for about two years and finally carving out some non-free time to do this in, I thought I'd have a go at my first podcast.  I realize it's probably still rough and the audio may not be the bestest there ever was (blame it on a $40 headset I've been using for the last 3 years), but my first episode is up:  Introduction and the Dark Side of the Moon (direct link).

If you really truly want to, you can subscribe to it by copying the feed URL to your software of choice:  feed://podcast.sjrdesign.net/pseudoastropodcast.rss .

Consider this both the first episode and the pilot episode.  I have two others already outlined, I've done some test recordings, thrown them out, and this is already the third recording of the first episode.  I'd really like to get some feedback before recording the "final" version of the next episode.  Constructive feedback is greatly appreciated.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2017, 06:05:20 PM by astrostu »

Offline seaotter

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 ;D

Anyone who loves pink Floyd knows there is no dark side of the moon. It's all dark. Good start!
« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 01:10:26 AM by seaotter »
"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline Parrot

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Great choice in music, classic radio educational show type of stuff. 

Pretty straightforward content.  I'm eager to hear you go over the stuff that people actually dispute, though.  That's where the most interesting facts pop up.

As for the puzzler, that's really interesting.  I'm going to have to think on it.

Offline Caffiene

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Nice.

Presentation: A+
Very clear, well spoken and easy to understand. It gave me a sort of educational lecture/presentation vibe. (If you want it to be more conversational, I think you could easily use a less slow and measured style and still be perfectly easy to understand)

Sound quality: A
Clean and clear audio. If anything just a little too clear, in that I occasionally felt like there was a little too much "mouth noise". But Ive very susceptible to noticing that and even then it was nowhere near a level Id find unpleasant.

Content: B
I felt like you were having trouble deciding what knowledge level audience you wanted to target, and it got you into a bit of trouble. The information itself was fine, but some of the level of explanation seemed inconsistent. For example, you explained that "the moon's orbital period (its year), is the same its its rotation (its day)", but later you throw out "Keppler was able to figure out" without any mention of who Keppler is. Although it might actually be my problem rather than yours, since I knew most of that information anyway so Im only guessing at what the intended audience would think too. I just felt it was a bit strange.

Puzzler: A+
Cant speak for anyone else, but I like the idea and the audience participation. I also found the puzzler straightforward enough to be easy to start thinking about, while still being an interesting enough question to be fun to think about.


Other note: I like the music, but the intro music seemed slightly long. It got me in a listening mood, but I was ready and waiting for the content to start for a while before the music finished.
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Offline seaotter

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What was it again? What would the phases of the moon look like if the moon were a cube?

And I hope you will remind us in this thread of new podcasts until it goes on iTunes!
"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline seaotter

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Would they be rectangles that get progressively fatter till we had a square and then thinner till no moon? I think I'm too close in my videos and I end up with too much curvature in the shadow. The normal half moon makes me think it's more the curvature of the moon than the earth that makes the crescent look.
"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline seaotter

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But during an luner eclipse it's the shadow of the earth and it looks curved.

"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline seaotter

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Well duh, I was making an eclipse instead of phases. The videos are even labeled right

« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 04:09:33 PM by seaotter »
"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline Chew

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comment deleted
"3 out of 2 Americans do not understand statistics." -Mark Crislip

Offline seaotter

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Shit now I was rotating te moon way too fast. One rotation for every revolution. What's the oreintation of the cube to the Earth? What's the near vs dark side  >:D of the cube?
« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 04:16:43 PM by seaotter »
"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline Chew

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The puzzler was a white moon cube with one side facing the Earth. Assume you can only see the side facing the Earth (i.e. neglect parallax).
"3 out of 2 Americans do not understand statistics." -Mark Crislip

Offline seaotter

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What would parallax have to do with the view?
"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline seaotter

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"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

Offline Chew

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What would parallax have to do with the view?

One would be able to see the sides, and not just the face facing the Earth, when the cube moon is on the horizon. Also we need to neglect the Libration cycle.
"3 out of 2 Americans do not understand statistics." -Mark Crislip

Offline seaotter

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So it's a white square that varies in brightness night to night for half the month, then a quick sweep across the face of the sunlight and then a dark square that varies in darkness due to earth shine for the other half?
"There is no use trying," said Alice; "one can't believe impossible things." Lewis Carroll

 

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