Author Topic: "Why Evolution Is True" -Jerry A. Coyne  (Read 72 times)

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Offline helvetica

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"Why Evolution Is True" -Jerry A. Coyne
« on: April 19, 2014, 02:08:26 PM »
Currently reading this book, but I'm kind of on the fence about whether or not I agree with the way it was written. Don't get me wrong: I'm learning quite a bit more about the details of evolution and examples of hard "proof." I still like the book. But there are some statements that make me think they would be more appropriate in a book explaining why evolution is NOT true.

Statements such as:

"It only makes sense that..."

"We know that..."

"We learned that..."

While I understand this guy's audience are people who already know evolution is true, I can't help but to be taken aback by some of the author's assumptions of what I know and what makes sense to me. I'm a little disappointed at how dumbed-down and simplified some concepts are and wonder if this is for the benefit of the book's purpose or if it turns off others who see these assumptions of what the reader knows or believes as "red flags."

If you've read it, what do you think?

Offline Sawyer

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Re: "Why Evolution Is True" -Jerry A. Coyne
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2014, 04:41:30 PM »
Currently reading this book, but I'm kind of on the fence about whether or not I agree with the way it was written. Don't get me wrong: I'm learning quite a bit more about the details of evolution and examples of hard "proof." I still like the book. But there are some statements that make me think they would be more appropriate in a book explaining why evolution is NOT true.

Statements such as:

"It only makes sense that..."

"We know that..."

"We learned that..."

While I understand this guy's audience are people who already know evolution is true, I can't help but to be taken aback by some of the author's assumptions of what I know and what makes sense to me. I'm a little disappointed at how dumbed-down and simplified some concepts are and wonder if this is for the benefit of the book's purpose or if it turns off others who see these assumptions of what the reader knows or believes as "red flags."

If you've read it, what do you think?

Coyne's book is probably the best organized book on evolution that I have read, but I didn't find it all that exciting.  Neil Shubin's book Your Inner Fish is fresh in my mind thanks to an ongoing PBS special, and I really preferred his approach.  And Gould is still my favorite author on the topic, although many of his essays are outdated at this point.

Offline ShadowSot

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Re: "Why Evolution Is True" -Jerry A. Coyne
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2014, 08:12:32 PM »
 The strength of the book is that compared to Inner Fish it's much shorter. I think that means he has to keep it pretty simple, which might be why there's the problems you see.
 
“I'm smart enough to know that I'm dumb.”
 - Richard Feynman

Offline helvetica

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Re: "Why Evolution Is True" -Jerry A. Coyne
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2014, 02:56:47 PM »
Maybe I should switch to Your Inner Fish then.  :)

Thanks!

 

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