Author Topic: ER centers do not take female pain as seriously as male pain  (Read 429 times)

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Offline superdave

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Re: ER centers do not take female pain as seriously as male pain
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2017, 11:16:49 AM »
I'm not stating that there isn't bias.  I'm saying that the bias arises naturally as a result of women being much more likely to go to the doctor for pain in general.  Think "the boy who cried wolf" but on a gender scale.

That would be the case if this were true, but is it?

Online Johnny Slick

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Re: ER centers do not take female pain as seriously as male pain
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2017, 05:51:17 PM »
I am utterly shocked that the same players as always are coming out as unsympathetic to people who are not white men. As someone who has almost certainly felt more physical pain in my life than the responder (I played football in high school but more importantly I lived for years with really bad dental problems, problems that culminated in multiple extractions and root canals, and in the process pain so extreme that the experience of having anesthesia wear off in the middle of one of those root canals doesn't even place in the top 5 of my most painful moments), I concur with others who say that experiencing really severe pain inures you to lesser hurts, and since giving birth is perhaps the most common shared experience of extreme pain that we have as humans, I just see no reason why women as a whole would have higher and not lower thresholds than men.

The thing is, too, that for all of these anecdotes about how men are socialized to just suck it up and act stoic, we are also I think far freer in our society to admit that our shoulder hurts or whatever than women are. In fact, if we're going to compare hoary stereotypes, what about the one that's about how men get whiny and miserable when they have a cold whereas women will just act like it's no big thing?

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Offline Andrew Clunn

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Re: ER centers do not take female pain as seriously as male pain
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2017, 06:11:00 PM »
The thing is, too, that for all of these anecdotes about how men are socialized to just suck it up and act stoic, we are also I think far freer in our society to admit that our shoulder hurts or whatever than women are. In fact, if we're going to compare hoary stereotypes, what about the one that's about how men get whiny and miserable when they have a cold whereas women will just act like it's no big thing?

In my experience men in relationships expect to be babied a lot more than women when they get sick.  So yeah, anecdotally, that one sounds accurate too.

Offline DG

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Re: ER centers do not take female pain as seriously as male pain
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2017, 06:20:23 PM »
I always think this is funny, I suspect it's simply impossible to care. Along with the reality the that reported symptoms from heart attack (usually pain) is described differently between men and women.

Also, people respond to different types of pain differently - my wife suffered endometriosis for quite some time, so is experienced with pain (such that should would curl up on the lounge, crying from the pain) yet she winces and reacts far more readily to certain types of pain than I. I do not, for a moment, suggest that her pain is more of less serious - simply that it is perceived differently and hence reported differently. I am sure that I would be less able to cope with the routine pain she experiences.

When I tear a muscle playing football, I'll try to shrug it off and keep playing - if my wife pulls a muscle she's out for weeks "recovering" (one of these is sensible). Clearly the way that she and I would report that pain is different - even though when independently evaluated the actual "injury" is comparable.

Again, anecdotal - but I have issues when this is so clearly about subjective reporting of physical sensations.
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