Author Topic: Episode #575  (Read 3038 times)

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Offline Steven Novella

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Episode #575
« on: July 16, 2016, 12:38:16 PM »
What’s the Word: Apoptosis; News Items: Solar Panel Impact, Ancient Supernovae, Kubrick Moon Landing Hoax, Neurasthenia, Tiny-Armed Dinosaur, New Dwarf Planet; Who;s That Noisy; Science or Fiction
Steven Novella
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snovella@theness.com

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2016, 01:52:42 PM »
The Greek prefix ἀπο- means 'away' and definitely has a short alpha.  It is the same prefix you see in words like apocalypse, apocrypha, and apology.  I would suggest avoiding the pronouncing it with a long 'A,' as that would suggest a false etymology from the negative prefix (ᾱ-) as in asynchronous or atheist.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline AJ_Barbarito

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2016, 03:15:45 PM »
I used to have a friend on Facebook (actually used to be a friend IRL too) who was a Newtown/Sandyhook "truther." He wanted me to watch this hours-long public question and answer session where the truthers were questioning the police chief in the matter. He wanted me to subject my knowledge of the law and evidence to it, convinced that any real lawyer would see that it was an iron-clad case for conspiracy. I did not watch the whole thing, because I don't have the time. But even if I did, my skills as a lawyer and knowledge of evidence told me that all of the evidence was incredibly circumstantial, and couldn't carry any burden of proof. But the real issue was just that he wanted me to engage; to legitimize his neurosis. I came to understand that there was nothing I could do to convince him that he was unreasonable, and frankly, I didn't really like him all that much anymore anyway. Fighting against "truthers" means fighting incredible cognitive biases, and you won't ever win. Once someone is entrenched, there is almost no chance of convincing them of their various biases and fallacies. Usually you just need to walk away.

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2016, 03:31:23 PM »
Apoptosis is a word that I became familiar with a dozen ears ago.... along with p53 and undifferentiated.  Dr Google was very informative, unfortunately.

You mention an explosion of rodent population, and all it entails.  You might be having a mast year (or the NA equivalent), as we in NZ are having; yet again, thank you, climate change. 

The exponential increase in rodents (rats and mice) leads to a huge trophic cascade of predators and possums, and destruction of many native birds species and certain vegetation.  All the mammalian species involved are introduced and, of course, the native species are especially affected.  The increase in the possum population also increases the problem of bovine TB.

The mast here is the overproduction of seed by the variety of (largely) beech trees (Nothofagus) that make up many of our native forests.  The village of Arthur's Pass reported literally hundreds of mice every day in the summer/autumn in every home and business. 

Thousands of tonnes of 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate) are being dropped by helicopter again this year to try to manage this.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2016, 05:43:48 PM by lonely moa »
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Warren Zevon

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2016, 05:42:24 PM »
My impression is that what music you like has a lot to do with memory and conditioning, given how taste in music is different generation to generation as they grow up with different music. And I don't see why that wouldn't also apply to how we experience consonance and dissonance.

Offline AJ_Barbarito

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2016, 08:24:42 PM »
With regard to dissonant music: Gregorian chant is not typically "dissonant." Cara may have been thinking of Tibetan throat singing, which is. Cara seemed to think "dissonant" means "in a minor key," which it does not. A minor key is basically the same as a major key, only starting and ending at different "Do"s (as in Do-Re-Mi). "Dissonance" refers to the intervals between notes, and typically occurs when chords contain notes not in the same key.

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2016, 12:22:31 AM »
uh-POP-tuh-sis

Offline The Internet

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2016, 11:47:05 PM »
Who's that noisey:
(click to show/hide)

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2016, 12:21:56 AM »
uh-POP-tuh-sis

The penultimate syllable is definitely long: it's an omega.  The Greeks would have pronounced it approximately ah-PAHP-toh-sis (using the Wikipedia repelling) without any shwa vowels, although the way they would pronounce the πτ consonant blend is impossible to reproduce for an English speaker.  The real syllable division would be before the second P: the coiners of the term are correct that ah-PAH-toh-sis is the best English approximation.  The first two syllables should be identical to those of 'apology' and the final two identical to those of 'ptosis'
« Last Edit: July 18, 2016, 12:24:32 AM by The Latinist »
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Online Tassie Dave

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2016, 12:29:30 AM »
Steve has got a venomous snake in his yard and he's leaving it there  ??? That MF would be gone 5 minutes after I found it  ;) Especially with kids and pets in the house.

I don't have to worry about trying to identify snakes here. There's no such thing as a non-lethal snake in Tasmania. They are all venomous from birth.

Just to be pendantic, the date in the title of this week's episode says 2015. I thought I had downloaded an old show until I checked the show number.

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2016, 06:13:05 AM »
uh-POP-tuh-sis

The penultimate syllable is definitely long: it's an omega.  The Greeks would have pronounced it approximately ah-PAHP-toh-sis (using the Wikipedia repelling) without any shwa vowels, although the way they would pronounce the πτ consonant blend is impossible to reproduce for an English speaker.  The real syllable division would be before the second P: the coiners of the term are correct that ah-PAH-toh-sis is the best English approximation.  The first two syllables should be identical to those of 'apology' and the final two identical to those of 'ptosis'

I know, and I don't actually pronounce it that way, but that's the first thing that popped into my head when they talked about the alternative pronunciation. :)

Also, "PAH" as a pronunciation for the letters "PO" is a distinctly American thing. Most of the rest of us pronounce it "PO".

Offline Dan I

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2016, 08:40:49 AM »
What happened to Steve's audio during science or fiction? Suddenly time warped back to bad 90s tech or something?

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2016, 09:44:07 AM »
Also, "PAH" as a pronunciation for the letters "PO" is a distinctly American thing. Most of the rest of us pronounce it "PO".

But it's not PO, it's ΠΟ. If it were a long O, it would be omega.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Online Harry Black

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2016, 03:48:27 PM »
I feel like there was something up with the editing this week?
 I didnt really get to learn anything about David and didnt hear him speak much? Am I supposed to know who he is? He sounds like a nice guy of course, Im just confused.
Maybe I spaced out or got distracted when that was all explained....
So to add to my feeling of silliness, I googled consonant and dissonant music, but the explanations make zero sense to me.
Can someone explain it very simply? To someone who doesnt really listen to music or understand its written form...
Maybe an example of each might help?

Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Episode #575
« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2016, 04:37:38 PM »
As a semi-interesting aside, the town of Snowflake has around 5500 in population, and is around a mile high in elevation.  While it is dry-ish (around 12 or so inches of rain per year) it isn't your typical desert environment.  It is a largely Mormon settlement originally formed by Mormons of the Snow and Flake families.  In fact, Jeff Flake, our junior Senator, is from there.
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