Author Topic: Episode #610  (Read 1522 times)

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Offline pipelineaudio

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2017, 10:06:31 AM »
Didn't Thunderf00t take Cara to task for solar roadways a few years ago? I know he recently did some updates on these as well.

So bummed, it would be cool as hell to have this work

Online Friendly Angel

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #16 on: March 20, 2017, 12:16:56 PM »
I am an exterminator for 20 years. Steve and Cara are both incorrect. Brown Recluse spiders don't live in either CT or CA. This is the 2nd time Steve has claimed Brown Recluse spiders live in CT. He did it on a show with Bill Nye a few years ago & Bill wrongly claimed Brown Recluse spiders lived in WA.   https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef631

I remember the discussion about that too.  I've known several people who brought their dogs to California veterinarians and were told that their dogs had been bitten by Brown Recluse spiders... so the wrong goes pretty deep.
Amend and resubmit.

Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2017, 12:40:01 PM »
Here is a PDF of a newsletter from the U of A extension service regarding recluse spider species.  As you can see, there are several species of  Recluse spiders, some of which do exist in California, Arizona and New Mexico.  None seem to exist in the Northeast U.S., however.

https://cals.arizona.edu/urbanipm/pest_press/2006/november.pdf
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
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Online brilu34

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2017, 02:25:56 PM »
Here is a PDF of a newsletter from the U of A extension service regarding recluse spider species.  As you can see, there are several species of  Recluse spiders, some of which do exist in California, Arizona and New Mexico.  None seem to exist in the Northeast U.S., however.

https://cals.arizona.edu/urbanipm/pest_press/2006/november.pdf

The claim was Brown Recluse spiders. There aren't Brown Recluse spiders in CA. Yes, there other species of recluses in CA. They live mostly in the unpopulated desert areas & are uncommon. I don't think they were talking about the rarely encountered native CA recluses.                                                                                                             

Links from CA entomologists  http://spiders.ucr.edu/myth.html   http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7468.html

Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2017, 02:38:39 PM »
Here is a PDF of a newsletter from the U of A extension service regarding recluse spider species.  As you can see, there are several species of  Recluse spiders, some of which do exist in California, Arizona and New Mexico.  None seem to exist in the Northeast U.S., however.

https://cals.arizona.edu/urbanipm/pest_press/2006/november.pdf

The claim was Brown Recluse spiders. There aren't Brown Recluse spiders in CA. Yes, there other species of recluses in CA. They live mostly in the unpopulated desert areas & are uncommon. I don't think they were talking about the rarely encountered native CA recluses.                                                                                                             

Links from CA entomologists  http://spiders.ucr.edu/myth.html   http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7468.html

I wasn't trying to contradict you, I was making the exact same point you just made.  They are Recluse spiders, just not Brown Recluses.
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
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Offline pipelineaudio

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #20 on: March 20, 2017, 08:06:39 PM »
Wow! So the one that causes so much misery in Arizona isn't even a brown recluse? It looks to be one of two different species.

Offline PatrickG

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Solar Freaking Roadways: utter failure
« Reply #21 on: March 20, 2017, 08:10:47 PM »
Here is a good takedown of 'Solar Freaking Roadways' by Dave Jones of EEVblog from a few months back, including details about their pathetic test installation:



As an electrical engineer, Dave was one of the first to call the BS in 2014:



And here is a detailed technical overview:




A live webcam of the roadways in all their glory is here:
http://www.sandpointidaho.gov/visiting-sandpoint/solar-roadways#ad-image-6
Is seems they fixed the leds, but no other info is still lacking.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 08:24:18 PM by PatrickG »

Offline salmonchunks

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #22 on: March 21, 2017, 12:16:43 AM »
Here is something very similar to last week's Who's That Noisy, you can do similar stuff with a foam cup and slinkies.


He also explains some of the physics behind the sound in this video.

Offline captnkurt

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2017, 12:20:02 AM »
When Benoit Mandelbrot came up in this episode, I was so hoping someone would mention Jonathan Coulton's song "Mandelbrot Set".


Not only does it have the correct pronunciation of his name, it even puts the math into an earworm!

Online werecow

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2017, 08:49:41 PM »
Ah, Alex Jones. Here he is as rational as I've ever seen him:



Isn't he precious?
Mooohn!

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #25 on: March 22, 2017, 04:30:51 AM »
Here in Arizona, we have a spider that I thought was a Huntsman Spider.  It's light brown, about the size of a black widow.  The cool think about it is that you can shine a bright flashlight out into the yard and find the spiders by the reflection of their eyes.  It's really amazing.

Amusing that you thought such a tiny spider might have been a huntsman. I've seen baby huntsmans that small, but they are typically several inches across the legs. The largest I've seen was at least 6" across the legs. They have been recorded up to 10" across, and one species endemic to Laos can grow to over a foot.

The huntsman spider's most noticeable characteristic is that it is big.

Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2017, 11:13:43 AM »
Here in Arizona, we have a spider that I thought was a Huntsman Spider.  It's light brown, about the size of a black widow.  The cool think about it is that you can shine a bright flashlight out into the yard and find the spiders by the reflection of their eyes.  It's really amazing.

Amusing that you thought such a tiny spider might have been a huntsman. I've seen baby huntsmans that small, but they are typically several inches across the legs. The largest I've seen was at least 6" across the legs. They have been recorded up to 10" across, and one species endemic to Laos can grow to over a foot.

The huntsman spider's most noticeable characteristic is that it is big.

Wow, that IS big.   ;D  The spider I'm talking about is able to fit in a 2"-3" circle -  so big in the Arizona, USA sense, but not so big in the Australia sense.  Here's a link to the reference I was using.  I can't vouch for its accuracy: http://www.spiderzrule.com/huntsman1.htm


Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

Online werecow

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #27 on: March 22, 2017, 12:45:42 PM »
Here in Arizona, we have a spider that I thought was a Huntsman Spider.  It's light brown, about the size of a black widow.  The cool think about it is that you can shine a bright flashlight out into the yard and find the spiders by the reflection of their eyes.  It's really amazing.

Amusing that you thought such a tiny spider might have been a huntsman. I've seen baby huntsmans that small, but they are typically several inches across the legs. The largest I've seen was at least 6" across the legs. They have been recorded up to 10" across, and one species endemic to Laos can grow to over a foot.

The huntsman spider's most noticeable characteristic is that it is big.

Wow, that IS big.   ;D  The spider I'm talking about is able to fit in a 2"-3" circle -  so big in the Arizona, USA sense, but not so big in the Australia sense.  Here's a link to the reference I was using.  I can't vouch for its accuracy: http://www.spiderzrule.com/huntsman1.htm

Arachnophobes probably shouldn't watch this:


« Last Edit: March 22, 2017, 01:27:29 PM by werecow »
Mooohn!

Offline Dan I

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2017, 12:48:08 PM »
Didn't Thunderf00t take Cara to task for solar roadways a few years ago? I know he recently did some updates on these as well.

So bummed, it would be cool as hell to have this work

The concept itself is an interesting idea. And like they said, maybe for a driveway or a footpath, or some lower traffic area of the country (in a sunny environment) you might be onto something. But these guys just ran way too far way too fast.

This idea should have still be in the "drawing board" stage of "Could this even work..." not "build a prototype."

Offline Pusher Robot

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Re: Episode #610
« Reply #29 on: March 22, 2017, 01:49:56 PM »
Didn't Thunderf00t take Cara to task for solar roadways a few years ago? I know he recently did some updates on these as well.

So bummed, it would be cool as hell to have this work

The concept itself is an interesting idea. And like they said, maybe for a driveway or a footpath, or some lower traffic area of the country (in a sunny environment) you might be onto something. But these guys just ran way too far way too fast.

This idea should have still be in the "drawing board" stage of "Could this even work..." not "build a prototype."

Even for that I don't think it makes sense, because you'll likely have to spend far more making them a suitable surface than you would simply elevating them over the surface, which also increases efficiency by enabling angling and provides shelter for the surface at the same time
A novice was trying to fix a broken Lisp machine by turning the power off and on.
Knight, seeing what the student was doing, spoke sternly: “You cannot fix a machine by just power-cycling it with no understanding of what is going wrong.”
Knight turned the machine off and on.
The machine worked.

 

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