Author Topic: What is it like to live in Australia?  (Read 775 times)

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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2017, 12:21:50 AM »
I have naked ADSL. It's not horrifically expensive and it's fast enough for my needs. My needs are extremely modest though - YouTube and Netflix are my biggest draws, and I don't game online at all. My internet is used by one person only, so there's no simultaneous downloads to different machines.

Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2017, 04:10:28 AM »
Australia is a Third World country when it comes to internet speeds and services.

there are unlimited options here for A$60/month but speed is limited to 12Mbps.

I have unlimited for Aus$60 a month but only get 8Mbps. Which is pretty good for country Tasmania, but shit by world standards  :'(
Useless for streaming, but ok for what I mostly use. It is a pain when I need to download 40Gb Xbox One games though.

We have been promised NBN by 2020, but I am not holding my breath. We were promised it by 2015 originally   ???

Offline Caffiene

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2017, 05:43:02 AM »
I have unlimited for Aus$60 a month but only get 8Mbps. Which is pretty good for country Tasmania, but shit by world standards  :'(

Pretty good for a lot of Australia. Ive had ADSL around 10 to 14Mbps, but Ive also had from barely usable 1Mbps up to about 7 or 8Mbps at various places around Melbourne. Im on about 8Mbps at the moment, but Im fortunate to have iiNet's private cable in the area which can do 100+ if Im lucky on an unlimited plan, which Im looking at getting connected (just a pain getting a cable connection to a rental).
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Offline xenu

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2017, 11:16:03 AM »
I would think that Australia would be prim territory for high speed train service. Big city's and open spaces in between.
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Offline Tassie Dave

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2017, 04:39:08 PM »
I would think that Australia would be prim territory for high speed train service. Big city's and open spaces in between.

It gets proposed every few years. Mainly to connect Melbourne and Sydney.
Making it economically viable has been the stumbling block.

We just fly every where. Flights are relatively cheap.

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2017, 04:43:36 PM »
I loved it.  I would go back in a heartbeat.
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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2017, 05:44:21 PM »
I could go on and on about how great Canberra is to live in, especially now that we're finally shaking off our reputation as a boring city full of politicians. But I'm sure it'd just bore everyone.
I spent a couple weeks in Sydney, Cairns, and Brisbane, on the Ken Ham/AIG vacation/tour ironically. Brisbane was pretty cool, Cairns was cool for the reef and he giant "CONDOM KINGDOM" sign and sex emporium next to our hotel.

Does Canberra have a giant sex emporium?
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Offline Caffiene

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2017, 05:50:14 PM »
I would think that Australia would be prim territory for high speed train service. Big city's and open spaces in between.

One of the parties that was on the ballot for senate election for the last few elections here was specifically the "Bullet Train Party". (We get a lot of one-issue parties on senate elections because of the way the system works and because of our preferential voting)

But like Tassie Dave said, the main issue is making it commercially competitive vs air travel to be worth the investment. Melbourne to Sydney is about an hour flight (1.5 to 2 hours with check in, boarding, etc) whereas the current regular speed trains take 10 to 12 hours even with minimal stops - and the ticket prices are comparable.
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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2017, 05:51:30 PM »
I would think that Australia would be prim territory for high speed train service. Big city's and open spaces in between.

One of the parties that was on the ballot for senate election for the last few elections here was specifically the "Bullet Train Party". (We get a lot of one-issue parties on senate elections because of the way the system works and because of our preferential voting)

But like Tassie Dave said, the main issue is making it commercially competitive vs air travel to be worth the investment. Melbourne to Sydney is about an hour flight (1.5 to 2 hours with check in, boarding, etc) whereas the current regular speed trains take 10 to 12 hours even with minimal stops - and the ticket prices are comparable.
Not gonna lie, if there's a power plug and meal service I would take a 10hr train over a 2hr flight.
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Offline Caffiene

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2017, 06:18:18 PM »
Not gonna lie, if there's a power plug and meal service I would take a 10hr train over a 2hr flight.

Ive done it before (flights tend to make me quite motion sick). Meals yes, power... cant remember, but I think so.

Main problem is just being cramped and squashed in. A day trip would be ok, although then you lose the whole day. Night trip when you want to sleep is an annoyance (they do have sleeper carriages, but the price is way higher than a flight).
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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2017, 06:22:03 PM »
Not gonna lie, if there's a power plug and meal service I would take a 10hr train over a 2hr flight.

Ive done it before (flights tend to make me quite motion sick). Meals yes, power... cant remember, but I think so.

Main problem is just being cramped and squashed in. A day trip would be ok, although then you lose the whole day. Night trip when you want to sleep is an annoyance (they do have sleeper carriages, but the price is way higher than a flight).
I should try a train to Chicago sometime. The idea of sleeping through a trip sounds amazing. If it remotely approaches a ship's rack, I would easily pay double the cost of a shitty commuter flight to sleep my way out.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2017, 06:23:37 PM »
The flight from Madrid to Seville in Spain takes about an hour. The high-speed "AVE" train takes 2 1/2 hours. But from the city center to the airport in Madrid takes an hour (IIRC) and you have to be there 90 minutes before your flight, and then wait half an hour for your luggage, and then have a long drive from the airport back to the city center.

As a result, people take the train, which does not require an early arrival, connects the city center to the city center, and when the train stops you step off and go. When I lived there they were planning a high-speed train to connect Madrid and Barcelona, and the airlines were doing everything they could to try to stop it from being built.

Modern trains (unlike the disasters we have in the U.S.) are comfortable, smooth, fast, and typically have an observation car, a bar car, and a dining car. They have a policy on the AVE between Madrid and Seville that if it's five minutes late it's free. I never heard of that happening in the entire year and a half was there. They have a radio program called Renfe Presenta, in which they announce all the trains currently running late at the time of the broadcast. At any given time, with several thousand trains running, there are typically 2 or 3 running late because of some problem with the track.

I think the French and Japanese trains are twice as fast as the Spanish AVE.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2017, 06:30:48 PM »
Not gonna lie, if there's a power plug and meal service I would take a 10hr train over a 2hr flight.

Ive done it before (flights tend to make me quite motion sick). Meals yes, power... cant remember, but I think so.

Main problem is just being cramped and squashed in. A day trip would be ok, although then you lose the whole day. Night trip when you want to sleep is an annoyance (they do have sleeper carriages, but the price is way higher than a flight).
I should try a train to Chicago sometime. The idea of sleeping through a trip sounds amazing. If it remotely approaches a ship's rack, I would easily pay double the cost of a shitty commuter flight to sleep my way out.

I had a sleeper on the Empire Builder between Fargo, N.D. and Seattle (and once to Spokane, before I moved here). Having a bed on the train is wonderful. But as noted above, the Empire Builder, the last time I took it, was horrid in other respects. The rolling stock is deteriorated. The A/C was a mess (one control for the whole car, which only the porter has access to; one end of the car was way too hot, and the other end was way too cold, and the windows didn't open in the sleeping compartments.) There was no A/C in the dining car and it was about 90 degrees F. And it typically runs hours late, because freight trains have priority, since Amtrak uses the freight rails.

I don't know about Amtrak's trains up and down the coasts, but I cannot recommend the Empire Builder.
Daniel
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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #28 on: April 04, 2017, 11:40:13 PM »
I could go on and on about how great Canberra is to live in, especially now that we're finally shaking off our reputation as a boring city full of politicians. But I'm sure it'd just bore everyone.
I spent a couple weeks in Sydney, Cairns, and Brisbane, on the Ken Ham/AIG vacation/tour ironically. Brisbane was pretty cool, Cairns was cool for the reef and he giant "CONDOM KINGDOM" sign and sex emporium next to our hotel.

Does Canberra have a giant sex emporium?

It's called Fyshwick.

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Re: What is it like to live in Australia?
« Reply #29 on: April 04, 2017, 11:44:57 PM »
I could go on and on about how great Canberra is to live in, especially now that we're finally shaking off our reputation as a boring city full of politicians. But I'm sure it'd just bore everyone.
I spent a couple weeks in Sydney, Cairns, and Brisbane, on the Ken Ham/AIG vacation/tour ironically. Brisbane was pretty cool, Cairns was cool for the reef and he giant "CONDOM KINGDOM" sign and sex emporium next to our hotel.

Does Canberra have a giant sex emporium?

It's called Fyshwick.
I had to Google to find that was on the ACT, but now it makes sense. My mental image of the ACT is basically a gun-gree version of Idiocracy full of fireworks, drugs, sex workers, and politicians.
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