Author Topic: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?  (Read 251 times)

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Offline Desert Fox

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I was discussing a court case where there was an accident. I think the whole incident could have been avoided if those involved made alternate plans.  There is a term in aviation called "Get There Itis"

The determination of a pilot to reach a destination even when conditions for flying are very dangerous.

I was thinking that many driving deaths and deaths in boating could be described similarly. I am wondering if the term should therefore be adopted more widely
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Online arthwollipot

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Re: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2017, 07:56:26 PM »
Sounds reasonable.

Online Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2017, 08:06:37 PM »
Push On fever is usually bad news
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Offline jt512

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Re: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2017, 12:24:19 AM »
I was discussing a court case where there was an accident. I think the whole incident could have been avoided if those involved made alternate plans.  There is a term in aviation called "Get There Itis"

The determination of a pilot to reach a destination even when conditions for flying are very dangerous.

I was thinking that many driving deaths and deaths in boating could be described similarly. I am wondering if the term should therefore be adopted more widely

As a pilot, a member of a minority transportation population, I am opposed to the appropriation of our terms by the majority automobile driver culture.

Offline xenu

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Re: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2017, 01:12:43 AM »
I alway  can tell when a pilot is heading home. The Wing would have to be falling off before he writes anything up.
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Re: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2017, 03:14:27 PM »
Would it be sort of the same idea behind the sunk costs fallacy? We've already invested in getting there, so it's better to keep going than not.

Offline sealcove

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Re: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2017, 06:40:05 AM »
Perhaps this specific phrase has origins in aviation, but the sentiment is certainly more broad. I knew and used get-there-itis (or a close variation) when it came to sailing and climbing, long before I became a pilot.


Offline Shibboleth

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Re: Stealing Aviation terms for other activities - Get-There-Itis?
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2017, 12:58:34 PM »
Drive to Survive, and Turn Around Don't Drown are two that I can think of in the driving world to combat this.
common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

 

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