Author Topic: Sci-Fi story help  (Read 1479 times)

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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #60 on: May 09, 2017, 09:57:40 PM »
Which is why a simple fusion battery in every device is much more reliable than having multiple interacting power distribution systems. :D

And it means that consoles are less likely to explode in showers of sparks when you get hit by a torpedo.

Offline Desert Fox

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #61 on: May 09, 2017, 11:45:00 PM »
Which is why a simple fusion battery in every device is much more reliable than having multiple interacting power distribution systems. :D

And it means that consoles are less likely to explode in showers of sparks when you get hit by a torpedo.

Only Star Trek has exploding consoles
Assuming that power systems need maintenance, every separate system will add to complexity.
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #62 on: May 10, 2017, 02:20:34 AM »
Which is why a simple fusion battery in every device is much more reliable than having multiple interacting power distribution systems. :D

And it means that consoles are less likely to explode in showers of sparks when you get hit by a torpedo.

Only Star Trek has exploding consoles
Assuming that power systems need maintenance, every separate system will add to complexity.
Yeah, it's a bit of a characteristic conceit of my future vision that power systems are as easy and simple to maintain as batteries, but virtually perpetual.

Offline Desert Fox

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #63 on: May 13, 2017, 07:04:45 PM »
Faster than light travel in my science fiction is by jumping through wormholes which are form through some kind of gravity interaction with the stars and the rest of the universe.
They tend to form on a G2 class star somewhere around Pluto orbit or around 6 light hours out.
Smaller stars they form closer in while larger stars form further out.

Now what I am curious about is assume that a star is around 8 solar masses.
It has wormholes really far out as one might expect. Probably be something like 45 light hours out from the star.

An 8 solar mass star can go super nova and leaves a core of several solar masses behind.
This then becomes a neutron star.

What should I have happen with wormholes around the neutron star? I am not too worried about black holes because I believe that neutron stars are far more common.
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

 

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