Author Topic: WhatsApp?  (Read 551 times)

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Offline Harry Black

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Re: WhatsApp?
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2017, 03:52:17 PM »
It rings the same as your normal phone app but it identifies itself as a whatsapp call and has a green border.
It does give a busy signal if the person is already on a call of any sort but I dont know how it works with call waiting.

Online daniel1948

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Re: WhatsApp?
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2017, 07:19:16 PM »
So it knows if you're already on the phone? I mean the actual phone?
Daniel
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: WhatsApp?
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2017, 09:24:07 AM »

Thank you. I knew stuff from the iOS App Store is relatively safe. I didn't know it was completely risk free. That's good to know.

I don't think there's zero risk, for example,  there are apps that are scams.  Apple takes them down as they find them, so you still need to be a bit careful what you use.

I would say there's virtually zero risk of an app alllowing your phone to be hacked, which is what Daniel asked. I say virtually no risk because there is always the possibility that an app could sneak through that uses a zero-day exploit of the sandboxing system to gain access to the file system, though that seems pretty unlikely.  There are other risks, though, as you point out: from time to time an app will slip through that has improperly been given access to GPS data or contacts, for instance.  Often that's not malicious, but sometimes there's some data harvesting going on.  Apple has to vet thousands of apps, and a few sneak by.

So it knows if you're already on the phone? I mean the actual phone?

Apple created an API for VOIP apps that allows them essentially to use the same interface for handling incoming calls.  The app itself doesn't get access to call status; iOS handles the incoming call request and only opens WhatsApp when you accept.
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Online daniel1948

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Re: WhatsApp?
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2017, 01:00:29 PM »
So it knows if you're already on the phone? I mean the actual phone?

Apple created an API for VOIP apps that allows them essentially to use the same interface for handling incoming calls.  The app itself doesn't get access to call status; iOS handles the incoming call request and only opens WhatsApp when you accept.

Thank you.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
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Offline John Albert

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Re: WhatsApp?
« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2017, 01:37:08 AM »
I would say there's virtually zero risk of an app alllowing your phone to be hacked

This kind of false sense of security can be dangerous. There is NEVER "virtually zero risk" of being hacked. Being hacked is always a possibility, and that risk is near impossible to assess.

Installing software is always a risk-benefit proposition. You should always be careful about which apps you install on your devices, and the most prudent approach is not to install anything that you don't really need. 

Offline The Latinist

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Re: WhatsApp?
« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2017, 08:01:02 AM »
This kind of false sense of security can be dangerous. There is NEVER "virtually zero risk" of being hacked. Being hacked is always a possibility, and that risk is near impossible to assess.

I did not say that the risk was zero, I said that it was "virtually" zero.  I stand by that assessment; an application running in a sandbox within a chroot jail with access only to the APIs Apple chooses to expose has almost no chance of "hacking" a device.  It's not zero; we've seen a flaw in Safari's handling of true type fonts in PDFs exploited to jailbreak an iPhone. And there is always the risk (as I mentioned above) that an app might compromise privacy through misuse of APIs.  But the risk that anyone is going to be able to take over your computer using an App Store app is so small as to be negligible.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

 

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