Author Topic: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?  (Read 460 times)

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Offline Henning

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2017, 11:43:28 AM »
How to describe it relative to their home-planet Earth, which all humans (incl. the characters in your story) know about. But without the reference to Mars which they likely don't know or care about.
Arid, barren, cold, sub-G.
Or you mean more like a sciencey nickname that people will come up with in the future?
Or like a slang term because the characters in your story are so used to casually referring to planets like these?
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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2017, 12:17:23 PM »
Potentially habitable?
Amend and resubmit.

Online gmalivuk

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2017, 12:35:40 PM »
I'm reminded of in A Tale of Ice and Fire / Game of Thrones when a particular garment is referred to as having French sleeves or some such thing.  Which seems odd, considering there is no France in this world.
There might be some such thing, but "French" is definitely never mentioned in the books, and I don't recall any other references that only make sense with Earth's geography.

You could sneak some teaching in. I liked the "pop quiz" system of informing the reader.

Lt.: Name planets that match "terrestrial grade" for types A through D.

Midshipman: A - Earth, B - Proxima Centauri 3, C - Mars, D - Hestia.

Etc.
You could also just describe someone's thought process when thinking about the planet or the categorization. "She saw that it was marked 'Terrestrial - Grade C' on her monitor, being small and almost airless, with a surface gravity only one-third standard."
« Last Edit: April 24, 2017, 12:42:37 PM by gmalivuk »
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2017, 12:57:12 PM »
Going along with what arth said, I think a description of the planet's characteristics would be most helpful. Most striking about Mars to me are the massive features clearly shaped by water, contrasted with the complete lack of water (or is there??), or how the red colors everything--dust in, on, around everything as the fierce winds slowly erode the surface. The planet seems abandoned, dead. Unlike the gas giants--which are what they are, and always have been--Mars seems like it used to be alive.

Describe stuff like that, and I'll definitely see Mars in my head, regardless of what you call it.
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Offline Billzbub

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2017, 01:30:52 PM »
...to the rocky and desolate planet Globtrax, which lost most of its atmosphere and surface water millions of years ago to a runaway greenhouse effect.  Now, the expense of maintaining air pressure in the underground city complex is offset by the efficiency of space elevators in the reduced gravity...

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2017, 12:49:24 AM »
I'm reminded of in A Tale of Ice and Fire / Game of Thrones when a particular garment is referred to as having French sleeves or some such thing.  Which seems odd, considering there is no France in this world.

I recently re-read the series, and I don't remember that. I thought I would have noticed, since as you say it would stand out.

Online 2397

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2017, 03:46:52 AM »
It might be worth noting that Mars is an Earth-like planet, in some contexts. And Venus is Earth-like in most contexts.

So I don't think we have any established terms to differentiate between them, other than as the planets we know by name and have had described with multiple details.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2017, 08:18:36 AM »
I would say "marginally habitable".
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Offline Henning

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2017, 10:15:22 AM »
Going along with what arth said, I think a description of the planet's characteristics would be most helpful. Most striking about Mars to me are the massive features clearly shaped by water, contrasted with the complete lack of water (or is there??), or how the red colors everything--dust in, on, around everything as the fierce winds slowly erode the surface. The planet seems abandoned, dead. Unlike the gas giants--which are what they are, and always have been--Mars seems like it used to be alive.

Describe stuff like that, and I'll definitely see Mars in my head, regardless of what you call it.

We're obsessed with these things because Mars is in our backyard and the only other planet we have studied in such detail. I don't think DF's characters would care about such things. They would have seen a lot of planets like this and would be into quickly classifying them by more relevant factors than color and former water. What details are unique and relevant?
You kind of wanna look into the future when we have full reports on tens of thousands of exoplanets, what are the chances Mars is still special?
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #24 on: April 25, 2017, 12:34:16 PM »
Going along with what arth said, I think a description of the planet's characteristics would be most helpful. Most striking about Mars to me are the massive features clearly shaped by water, contrasted with the complete lack of water (or is there??), or how the red colors everything--dust in, on, around everything as the fierce winds slowly erode the surface. The planet seems abandoned, dead. Unlike the gas giants--which are what they are, and always have been--Mars seems like it used to be alive.

Describe stuff like that, and I'll definitely see Mars in my head, regardless of what you call it.

We're obsessed with these things because Mars is in our backyard and the only other planet we have studied in such detail. I don't think DF's characters would care about such things. They would have seen a lot of planets like this and would be into quickly classifying them by more relevant factors than color and former water. What details are unique and relevant?
You kind of wanna look into the future when we have full reports on tens of thousands of exoplanets, what are the chances Mars is still special?

Ah, I guess it depends on whose perspective we're getting. I think the above would be appropriate for a narrator talking to the audience (if the goal is to help the reader envision "Mars-like") but if it's a character who has seen countless such worlds describing it, then yeah, I can imagine they'd use very different descriptors.
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Offline Shibboleth

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2017, 12:28:01 PM »
New Jersey Like
common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2017, 03:28:22 PM »
Would a mostly dead world with something of an atmosphere (like Mars) likely always be red?
Trying to see if a natural process might result in a planet other than red?
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Online 2397

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Re: Any good terms for a Mars like planet?
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2017, 03:30:20 PM »
It could be one of those solid gold death stars planets.

 

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