Author Topic: How often do you run into a word that is spelled right but just looks wrong?  (Read 964 times)

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Offline Nemmzy

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All the time but I have dyslexia. I just assumed it was a problem for people like me. ???

Offline werecow

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Mooohn!

Offline arthwollipot

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Wednesday
I always have to say to my self, "Wed-nes-day" to get it right, same with "feb-ru-ary".
You mean you actually have to pronounce them correctly? Such a strain.

Online Ah.hell

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Wednesday
I always have to say to my self, "Wed-nes-day" to get it right, same with "feb-ru-ary".
You mean you actually have to pronounce them correctly? Such a strain.
I have never in my life heard any say wednesday  any way other than wendsday or wensday.  I won't make the same claim of February but I usually hear it as Febuary. 

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/english/wednesday

Do Ozzies actually pronounce the letters in the correct order?
« Last Edit: April 27, 2017, 09:36:26 AM by Ah.hell »

Online The Latinist

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I prounounce Wednesday "Wed-ǝns-day," with that schwa being particularly short.
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Offline seamas

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When you think about it, the English have it really rough (rough looks weird now that I think about it) with their place-names. Think Wednesday and February don't look how they are pronounced, try Thames, Hunstanton, Leominster, etc.

Online Noisy Rhysling

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When you think about it, the English have it really rough (rough looks weird now that I think about it) with their place-names. Think Wednesday and February don't look how they are pronounced, try Thames, Hunstanton, Leominster, etc.
I was riding a train in Japan back in the '80s and was seated behind two ladies who appeared to be taking English lessons at Uni. They sounded frustrated and I offered to help them. The next three hours passed quickly for me. But the ladies were still frustrated when we pulled into Tokyo. One of them looked at me and said "Do they really teach this stuff to babies?" (Paraphrased.) I got a good laugh out of that.
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Strange women lying in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government.

Offline bimble

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When you think about it, the English have it really rough (rough looks weird now that I think about it) with their place-names. Think Wednesday and February don't look how they are pronounced, try Thames, Hunstanton, Leominster, etc.

Warwick is a great one to hear Americans pronounce...  or indeed Warwickshire.  I always find it amusing when some scientific discovery is made by a British institution and the Rouges mangle the pronunciation.

Offline Caffiene

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Do Ozzies actually pronounce the letters in the correct order?

No, it would be just as weird here to pronounce them "in order".

Perhaps moreso - we dont pronounce those particular words significantly differently to other english speakers as far as Im aware, but in general aussie speech tends to drop more letters and syllables, not less[1]. If fact there is a version of days of the week in Australian speech that drops the 'a' from the "day" part and would render it closer to "Wensdee", although I would say that tends to be a semi-deliberate playful speech pattern rather than strictly an accent.


[1] Example: The city of "Melbourne". If spelled as commonly pronounced, you could probably get away with "Melbn". Or "Australian", commonly pronounced as something more closely resembling "Strain" or "Strayan".
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Offline arthwollipot

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Yes, it would be more common to hear "Wensday". "Wensdy" can still be heard, but it's a bit old-fashioned now. February would commonly be heard as "Febyury".

But they're wrong. They're all wrong.

Offline arthwollipot

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When you think about it, the English have it really rough (rough looks weird now that I think about it) with their place-names. Think Wednesday and February don't look how they are pronounced, try Thames, Hunstanton, Leominster, etc.

Warwick is a great one to hear Americans pronounce...  or indeed Warwickshire.  I always find it amusing when some scientific discovery is made by a British institution and the Rouges mangle the pronunciation.
Leicester.

Offline werecow

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When you think about it, the English have it really rough (rough looks weird now that I think about it) with their place-names. Think Wednesday and February don't look how they are pronounced, try Thames, Hunstanton, Leominster, etc.

Warwick is a great one to hear Americans pronounce...  or indeed Warwickshire.  I always find it amusing when some scientific discovery is made by a British institution and the Rouges mangle the pronunciation.
Leicester.

Worcestershire sauce.
Mooohn!

Offline arthwollipot

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When you think about it, the English have it really rough (rough looks weird now that I think about it) with their place-names. Think Wednesday and February don't look how they are pronounced, try Thames, Hunstanton, Leominster, etc.

Warwick is a great one to hear Americans pronounce...  or indeed Warwickshire.  I always find it amusing when some scientific discovery is made by a British institution and the Rouges mangle the pronunciation.
Leicester.

Worcestershire sauce.
Muenster.

Online Noisy Rhysling

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When you think about it, the English have it really rough (rough looks weird now that I think about it) with their place-names. Think Wednesday and February don't look how they are pronounced, try Thames, Hunstanton, Leominster, etc.

Warwick is a great one to hear Americans pronounce...  or indeed Warwickshire.  I always find it amusing when some scientific discovery is made by a British institution and the Rouges mangle the pronunciation.
Leicester.

Worcestershire sauce.
Muenster.
arthwollipot
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

 

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