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The problem in answering your question is that the question itself fails to specify which definition is being used, and also fails to specify whether a rotation is being measures against the equinoxes, against the galactic center, against the background galaxies, etc.

Ok, let me clarify that. Lets define "Chronological year" as a function of the SI definition of a second that I mentioned. In this way, a Year is defined as a FIXED amount of seconds, that is completely independent from the motion of starts, planets, etc. Lets call this variable CY.
Then, we have the Orbital years, which is defined as one complete orbit of Earth around the Sun. This variable CHANGES OVER TIME. The time Earth takes to orbit the Sun now is not the same as it did 1 billion years ago, which in turn, is different from that of 2 billion years ago.
E.g: One Orbital year of 2 billion chronological years ago could correspond to 0.8 chronological years. (It is right to assume that the orbits were shorter? Earth was closer to the Sun, right?)

Right now, 1 CY = 1 Orbit... But since the difference of these two units start to increase as we go back in time, how big would be the difference if we add all the discrepancies in 4.5 Billion years?
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The earth will have changed in mass and orbital location in ways that we can't discover, so it will be hard to say, really.
How many tons of space junk to we collect every year?
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Any critters in the water don't necessarily have to be alive to be detected. If you want to find things running around down there keep in mind that half of the age of life on this planet was cyanobacteria that didn't move noticeably at all.

And there are chemical compounds that are the result of metabolic processes only associated with life. If we detect methane and cabon dioxide and a few other compounds then we could be pretty certain they would be by products of living organisms.
Yep, and we don't want to go diving right away, there's a danger we'd introduce "hitchhikers" into that environment, which might badly muddle things.
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The earth will have changed in mass and orbital location in ways that we can't discover, so it will be hard to say, really.
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Well, okay, but that's like how I "love" beef pot roast. No Christian that I've ever met would characterize their love for God that way.
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Member Creations / Re: Yes, I have a sick, sick mind.
« Last post by daniel1948 on May 28, 2017, 01:12:35 PM »
Some of the above is why it would be located in a place with lax laws or no laws. As long as each person riding knows the risks I would not judge their motivations. If you're dumb enough to allow your friends to talk you into it, you're dumb enough to enter the Darwin lottery. No age limit either. If you can say "I know that someone on this ride will die, and it could be me" then you can ride. There could be the occasional error. Two people die instead of one. The answer to that would be "What the fuck did you expect? It's a death ride. Kids do stupid things all the time. Computers screw up."

Revised plan: No guarantee that only one person will be ejected. On some runs one person gets ejected near the start, so everyone thinks they're safe, and then a second person is ejected from the last high point. After that, nobody ever thinks they're entirely safe until they're actually off the ride. But an effort would be made to keep it to one per ride. Except for special runs, properly advertised as such, on which some larger number of people would be ejected. And special suicide runs, where everyone gets ejected, but in random order.

So now the waiver says "I know that at least one person on this ride will die, and it could be me." You can say it in English, German, French, Spanish, Russian, Hindi, Japanese, Arabic, Korean, Mandarin, or Cantonese. If you cannot speak any of those languages you're probably not traveling to an expensive tropical resort. Advance arrangements could be made for other languages on request and at additional cost. Or you could learn to mouth the words.
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Any critters in the water don't necessarily have to be alive to be detected. If you want to find things running around down there keep in mind that half of the age of life on this planet was cyanobacteria that didn't move noticeably at all.

And there are chemical compounds that are the result of metabolic processes only associated with life. If we detect methane and cabon dioxide and a few other compounds then we could be pretty certain they would be by products of living organisms.
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I'd say it's impossible to nail it down to an exact number of years/orbits, because we don't know how many other planets and gravitationally significant objects there were in the Solar system at first, that were later ejected.
So we put a ± on the end of the result.
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Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine / Re: Medical Tests and Probability
« Last post by 2397 on May 28, 2017, 12:54:11 PM »
Semi-related; reminds me of when they talk about bike helmets not working, or actually that recommending bike helmets is not working, because some people don't want to bike if they have to wear a helmet. Biking by itself is a benefit to society, so the recommendations have to be about more than telling people the exact facts.
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