Author Topic: Episode # 202  (Read 13109 times)

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Offline mrgrammar

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #105 on: June 13, 2009, 12:54:57 PM »
The word "fortnight", meaning two weeks, is a shortening of the term "fourteen nights" or "fourteenth night".  I'm surprised it's unfamiliar to USA-ians.  How about other numerical collective nouns like 'score', 'dozen' or 'baker's dozen'?  I'm pretty sure these are universal.
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Offline MisterMarc

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #106 on: June 13, 2009, 02:14:59 PM »
Wow....more smugly superior talk after such a concerted effort to bring the conversation back to civility. Well done! ;)

Jeez, you really are determined to take offence from my attempts at good-natured conversation, aren't you?

Must be your accent.

Offline Trinoc

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #107 on: June 13, 2009, 02:19:56 PM »
Must be your accent.

I don't have an accent ... everyone else has an accent! :)

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Offline wastrel

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #108 on: June 15, 2009, 03:11:28 PM »
(PS. What's a SAT word, and which word did you mean?)

The SATs are college placement exams (I think it stands for Scholastic Aptitude Test), so it's basically the type of word one might be asked to define in such an exam, but probably wouldn't use in everyday speech. The word I was referring to was 'acrimonious.' Calling something an 'SAT word' is basically a slang way of acknowledging someone's use of a big word.

Ah, OK. I was afraid I had found another word, like "fortnight", that doesn't exist in American English. Over here, "acrimonious" is not necessarily a word you'd overhear from a conversation at the supermarket checkout, but I wouldn't regard it as reserved for intellectuals.

It's not that fortnight doesn't exist in American English, it is just rarely used.

Offline cheglabratjoe

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #109 on: June 19, 2009, 11:41:26 PM »
Wanted to chime in about the mid-word T's Steve drops: it definitely is a Connecticut thing.  I don't know if I'd say specifically western CT; I'd probably describe it as the parts of CT that aren't polluted by New York and Boston accents.

When I was a kid (in central and eastern CT), we always felt that we spoke english correctly and everyone else had accents.  I'm sure everyone feels this way, but I maintain that we had a pretty good position.  We couldn't come up with anything we said incorrectly.

But, then someone's southern relative asked them to pronounce c-o-t-t-o-n.  And they said "cah-in."  Oops, no T sound.  There's a sharpness to the "cah" that definitely hints at the T, but it's not really there.  Oh well.  There is a small-part-of-Connecticut accent after all.  (At least it's better than the awful Rhode Island accent.)

Offline mrgrammar

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #110 on: June 20, 2009, 01:08:13 PM »
I heard once in College that the accent most favored (and most put out as normal) by the media is the midwest (Wisconsin area).
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Offline DoctorAtlantis

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #111 on: June 20, 2009, 01:48:01 PM »
It's not that fortnight doesn't exist in American English, it is just rarely used.

Indeed, though I used it myself just a fortnight and odd days ago. Prithee may it touch the tongue of a thousand mouths like some ribald jackanape gone mad at the county fair.

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Offline KarenX

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #112 on: July 02, 2009, 02:03:18 PM »
Oh, I'm pretty sure the Wisconsin accent is not the one most favored by the news media. Maybe--MAYBE--you could make that case for parts of like Ohio, but not Wisconsin.

I went to junior high school in Connecticut and guess I picked up more of an accent from there than I realize, and I haven't lived there in more than twenty years (although I speak to my BFF from CT on a near-daily basis, and have for more than fifteen years). I never noticed any of that about swallowing the Ts and how that's a Connecticut thing until seeing it written about in this thread.

What I'd like to hear is people's opinions on the pronunciation of "why" and "where" and such with the H sound in front of the word: hwhy and hwhere and such. I don't use it, and most people in Southern California don't use it, nor my relatives from Michigan and Ohio, or my friends from Connecticut, and it surprises me every time that I hear it.

(Sorry for dragging this out weeks later; I'm behind on episodes.)

Offline Trinoc

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #113 on: July 02, 2009, 02:53:04 PM »
What I'd like to hear is people's opinions on the pronunciation of "why" and "where" and such with the H sound in front of the word: hwhy and hwhere and such. I don't use it, and most people in Southern California don't use it, nor my relatives from Michigan and Ohio, or my friends from Connecticut, and it surprises me every time that I hear it.

In the UK, adding the "h" sound at the start of "why" etc., is usually a sign of Scottish origins.
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Offline GodSlayer

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #114 on: July 03, 2009, 02:26:30 PM »
In the UK, adding the "h" sound at the start of "why" etc., is usually a sign of Scottish origins.

aah, nice. if I'm not mistaken they put an extra 'h' in 'that', too ('why do you do thaht?'). sort of a generally more breathy way of talking.
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Offline GodSlayer

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Re: Episode # 202
« Reply #115 on: July 03, 2009, 02:29:00 PM »
It's not that fortnight doesn't exist in American English, it is just rarely used.

that explains how Demetri Martin was about to get a laugh out of this 'joke':

"I like when good things happen to me, but I wait two weeks to tell anyone, because I like to use the word 'fortnight'."
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In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.

 

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