Author Topic: Too Cool not to post  (Read 257728 times)

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Online CarbShark

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3105 on: January 16, 2020, 06:32:43 PM »
Go to google:

Search for "Wizard of Oz"

Click the Ruby Slippers

Then, click the Tornado.

You're welcome.
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Online Tassie Dave

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3106 on: January 16, 2020, 07:52:48 PM »
Go to google:

Search for "Wizard of Oz"

Click the Ruby Slippers

Then, click the Tornado.

You're welcome.

My niece showed me that one. It is cool  8)

There is a similar one for searching Thanos

Click on the Infinity Gauntlet
watch (also notice the results counter) then click Infinity Gauntlet again


Offline werecow

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3107 on: January 19, 2020, 10:09:35 AM »
Yesterday I did a movie night with a few friends and one of the snacks I bought were "kaasvlinders", cheese butterflies. Someone pointed out that the word for butterfly seems to be different in every European language. I got curious, and came across this article.

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Butterflies, on the other hand, have been all over the world since before there were even people. They weren't imported all at one time. But that still doesn't account for why practically all of the different languages' words are different from one another. Words within language families tend to resemble each other. Butter, in the languages listed above, is beurre, burro, mantequilla, manteiga, Butter, boter, smör, smør, maslo, masło, voi, või, vaj, boútyro. Just five different sets of related words. Look again at the words for butterfly: 15 languages, 15 entirely different words — 16 when you count English. The words for "butterfly" have done about as much fluttering around through history as butterflies have.

So what accounts for this chaos? Witches, women, souls, birds, flowers, fluttering, and mists.

First come the witches. Some Germans at one time had the idea that witches turned themselves into butterflies to steal cream. The word Schmetten means "sour cream" in an Austrian dialect (taken from Czech smetana). From that they apparently made the word Schmetterling for those pretty little witches.

If you think those Germans are funny, guess where we got butterfly from. Yup, it may well have been because we thought they were witches coming to steal the butter. Or it may just have been that people thought butterflies liked butter, or that some of the more common ones in England have pale yellow wings. Or it may originally have involved beating (of wings) rather than butter. What we do know is that it doesn't come from flutter by — the Old English word for butterfly was buttorfleoga, which is too far to flap from flotora be, Old English for flutter by.

Then come the other ladies. Russian for butterfly is babochka, which is a diminutive of baba, "old woman." The story goes that Russians believed that women turned into butterflies when they died. Witches especially. Meanwhile, Spanish children used to sing songs that included verses such as "María pósate, descansa en el suelo," which means "Mary, alight, rest on the ground." From María pósate came the Spanish word for butterfly: mariposa.

Next come the birds and the flowers. The Danish sommerfugl means "summer bird." They have actual birds in Denmark in the summer, too, but there it is. Meanwhile, the Greek petaloúda is related to the word pétalon, which is the Greek origin of petal. So in Greek, butterflies are seen as like flying flowers. Which sure beats witches who steal butter. But in ancient Greek, they used the word psyche, which also meant "soul" — more dead people fluttering around.

And, yes, there's the fluttering: Several of the words in other languages come from imitations of the butterfly's fluttering wings. The ancient Romans thought papilio was a good imitation of the wings flapping. French papillon comes from that, and Italian farfalla and Portuguese borboleta may as well — or borboleta may actually come from Latin for "pretty little thing." Dutch vlinder may be related to a word for "flutter" and may be related to an older imitative word viveltere, which comes from an older Germanic word that may be what developed differently into Swedish fjäril (or fjäril may be related to feathers).

Talk about words fluttering through history. English also has a related word, flinder, but we decided we liked butterfly better — just as the Germans preferred Schmetterling to Feifalter. It's the witches, I tell ya.

And then there are the dark mists of time. The Estonian liblikas and Hungarian lepke are descended from a single Finno-Ugric root, as is an alternative Finnish word, liippo. We're not sure where that root comes from, though it may be borrowed from a Greek word for "scales" (which you'll also see at the start of the genus name Lepidoptera). We are less sure where Hungarian pillangó and Finnish perhonen are from, aside from perhonen being a diminutive of perho, which also means "butterfly." Southern Slavic languages tend to use leptir or a similar word, which may be from the same root as lepke. Some Slavic languages have a word like the Polish motyl, coming from a root that may have to do with sweeping (as in back and forth) or may be related to...um...excrement. Small wonder that the Russians preferred their little old lady babochka.

Pineapples, meanwhile, just sit there. They may be delicious, but they're not magical like butterflies.

Incidentally, in many languages, they use the same or a related word for moth as for butterfly. Some languages call moths "night butterflies." Well, they are closely related. And some languages, such as Italian and Russian, use the same word for bow tie as for butterfly. You can see it, right?
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Online John Albert

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3108 on: January 24, 2020, 03:36:32 AM »

Online Morvis13

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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3110 on: January 29, 2020, 08:07:28 AM »
https://wtop.com/funny-weird-news/2020/01/utah-man-builds-bulletproof-stormtrooper-suit-with-3-d-printer/
I'm reminded of the Mythbusters episode "What is bulletproof." Evidently not their "bulletproof" shield they'd been using for years.  >:D
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Offline werecow

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3111 on: January 29, 2020, 08:21:29 AM »
Mooohn!

Offline Jeremy's Sea

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3112 on: January 29, 2020, 05:31:33 PM »
https://wtop.com/funny-weird-news/2020/01/utah-man-builds-bulletproof-stormtrooper-suit-with-3-d-printer/
Since the next mass shooter could now 3-D print bulletproof armor, the cops will need to start dressing in full bulletproof armor. Do you want a stormtrooper army?! This is how you get a stormtrooper army!  :D
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Offline werecow

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3113 on: January 30, 2020, 12:29:31 AM »
https://wtop.com/funny-weird-news/2020/01/utah-man-builds-bulletproof-stormtrooper-suit-with-3-d-printer/
Since the next mass shooter could now 3-D print bulletproof armor, the cops will need to start dressing in full bulletproof armor. Do you want a stormtrooper army?! This is how you get a stormtrooper army!  :D

When you look for "next gen armor", this is what comes up:



It's Russian, so that's basically the U.S. now, right? Anyway, just squint a little and change the colors.
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Online John Albert

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3114 on: March 10, 2020, 08:27:01 PM »

Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3115 on: March 11, 2020, 11:38:35 AM »
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Online John Albert

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3116 on: March 15, 2020, 04:15:29 AM »

Online John Albert

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« Reply #3117 on: March 21, 2020, 10:12:14 PM »
Not as majestic as experiencing it in person, but still kinda cool.



Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3118 on: March 22, 2020, 04:03:24 AM »
Possibly not cool to you, but I found this fascinating,

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Holy crap that was awesome. She is AMAZING.
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Online John Albert

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Re: Too Cool not to post
« Reply #3119 on: March 27, 2020, 05:07:46 AM »