Author Topic: Rate the last book you just read  (Read 114103 times)

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Offline Nosmas

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1035 on: June 06, 2019, 04:47:33 PM »
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. 9/10

Normally I want more action out of my novels but I decided to dive into it after reading the countless reviews giving it praise. I really enjoyed it. It's extremely character driven and the story does not include much in the way of travelling to new places or action with high stakes. It still sucked me in. My mass produced paperback copy was over 700 pages and I didn't skim through any of them. I finished it last week and I'm already about 100 pages into the sequel.

Unfortunately the author seems to have hit a wall with the third and final novel as fans have been waiting 8 years for it and the author still hasn't committed to a release year. So I expect to be frustrated by that assuming I enjoy the second novel as much as the first.

LOL, buckle up! ETA:  There is "The Slow Regard of Silent Things," which is listed as book 2.5.  I have not read it, but my son has, and he enjoyed it.  It concerns the character, Auri.

I'm having a weird reaction to the story. I want the protagonist to grow up and become the bad ass they keep saying he will become but I also enjoy the story of him as a kid in the university. The books are extremely heavy on foreshadowing and I think that hooks me even more.

I think Kvothe as a character is my main draw to these books so I wonder if I would enjoy a book about another character as much. But it's worth consideration if I need to consume more of the world while waiting for book 3.
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Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1036 on: June 06, 2019, 05:39:00 PM »
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. 9/10

Normally I want more action out of my novels but I decided to dive into it after reading the countless reviews giving it praise. I really enjoyed it. It's extremely character driven and the story does not include much in the way of travelling to new places or action with high stakes. It still sucked me in. My mass produced paperback copy was over 700 pages and I didn't skim through any of them. I finished it last week and I'm already about 100 pages into the sequel.

Unfortunately the author seems to have hit a wall with the third and final novel as fans have been waiting 8 years for it and the author still hasn't committed to a release year. So I expect to be frustrated by that assuming I enjoy the second novel as much as the first.

LOL, buckle up! ETA:  There is "The Slow Regard of Silent Things," which is listed as book 2.5.  I have not read it, but my son has, and he enjoyed it.  It concerns the character, Auri.

I'm having a weird reaction to the story. I want the protagonist to grow up and become the bad ass they keep saying he will become but I also enjoy the story of him as a kid in the university. The books are extremely heavy on foreshadowing and I think that hooks me even more.

I think Kvothe as a character is my main draw to these books so I wonder if I would enjoy a book about another character as much. But it's worth consideration if I need to consume more of the world while waiting for book 3.
Yeah, that's kind of why I haven't read it yet.
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1037 on: June 07, 2019, 03:48:42 AM »
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. 9/10

Normally I want more action out of my novels but I decided to dive into it after reading the countless reviews giving it praise. I really enjoyed it. It's extremely character driven and the story does not include much in the way of travelling to new places or action with high stakes. It still sucked me in. My mass produced paperback copy was over 700 pages and I didn't skim through any of them. I finished it last week and I'm already about 100 pages into the sequel.

Unfortunately the author seems to have hit a wall with the third and final novel as fans have been waiting 8 years for it and the author still hasn't committed to a release year. So I expect to be frustrated by that assuming I enjoy the second novel as much as the first.

LOL, buckle up! ETA:  There is "The Slow Regard of Silent Things," which is listed as book 2.5.  I have not read it, but my son has, and he enjoyed it.  It concerns the character, Auri.

I'm having a weird reaction to the story. I want the protagonist to grow up and become the bad ass they keep saying he will become but I also enjoy the story of him as a kid in the university. The books are extremely heavy on foreshadowing and I think that hooks me even more.

I think Kvothe as a character is my main draw to these books so I wonder if I would enjoy a book about another character as much. But it's worth consideration if I need to consume more of the world while waiting for book 3.
Yeah, that's kind of why I haven't read it yet.

I've heard that Rothfuss and GRR Martin have a bet that neither one can finish their next book until the other author dies.


*I haven't actually heard that, but come on guys, give us what we want!!
Strange women lying in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government.

Offline Sawyer

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1038 on: June 10, 2019, 10:44:40 PM »
Somehow I managed to read four books in a row starting with "M" (kind of, if you go by the series name).

Mosquito by Andrew Spielman
6/10
Would be fun as a starting point to learn about mosquito biology and disease vectors, but not enough detail for someone obsessive about entomology.  Nice coverage of how the malaria eradication leaders were way too optimistic that pesticides were a magic bullet.



(Red) Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson
6/10
Went from being boring to being amazing to boring to amazing again, then maybe ended on boring?  With the exception of the space elevator, most of the hard sci-fi technological discussions could not hold my attention very long.  The real meat and potatoes of the story is seeing how the, shall we say, "apolitical" scientists on Mars are not able to grasp what's going on around them and how to respond to it.  I'll probably try book 2 in the series at some point.



Medical Detectives by Berton Roueche
9/10
Fantastic.  The blurb on the dust jacket of my edition alludes to the TV show House, and reading many of the essays feels like your own little personal journey as a contrarian diagnostician.  After hours of listening to my favorite parasitism podcast, I was happy to get the one "worm" case correct.  And apparently there's a bunch of buildings in New York (?) that still have anthrax spores in them, and only city planners and major hospitals know about them, and we're relying that they don't forget to mention this every time there's a demolition project?   :-\



Moby Dick by Herman Mellvile
I was prepared for the worst.  I knew it would be a cure for insomnia.  I knew about the infamous whale anatomy chapters.   But .... it was pretty damn good. 
9/10
The one thing that took me by complete surprise how funny Ishmael is, both in his general temperament and occasionally with some real zingers.  At one point in the cetology chapter, he proclaims that smaller whale-like fish aren't whales because, well, they just don't inspire enough awe.  "I deny their credentials as whales; and have presented them with their passports to quit the Kingdom of Cetology".  Several people keep calling Queequeg 'Quohog', which for some reason made me chuckle.  There's also the classic "dishonest translator" bit in later chapters that I've seen frequently in television and movies, and I'm now curious about its true origins.

I would absolutely hate having to read this for a high-school literature class though.  When I could follow Melville's descriptions and metaphors properly they could be beautiful, but when I got lost I just plowed ahead without stressing too much about what I might be missing.  In some ways the writing reminded me of the Blood Meridian in the laboriously long, meandering sentences and the constant confusion of who was talking, but somehow I never got as frustrated will Melville as I did with McCarthey.  The one other thing that allowed me to appreciate the intricate whale talk was knowing when Moby Dick was published relative to the scientific work of Linnaeus, Cuvier, Darwin, etc.  There's an acknowledgement that earlier 18th and 19th century naturalists who studied the seas could vary quite a bit in their devotion to objectivity and thorough work, and even some hints that they have yet to unearth the deeper connections between man and whale.  Sure, it can all be written off as metaphor, but there's one particular passage about seeing the bones in a whale fin and a human hand, and wondering how they could be so similar.

Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1039 on: June 11, 2019, 02:03:27 AM »
If you haven't read it yet, Nathaniel Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea is a great (non-fiction) account of the shipwreck of the Essex, which inspired Melville.

Offline Sawyer

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1040 on: June 30, 2019, 12:19:06 AM »
Oooo boy, Men at Arms joins the ranks of my favorite Discworld novels.  I couldn't really understand why people liked the City Watch books so much after the first one, but this kicked it up a notch.  I'm also glad I'm reading them in order, because we had plots or themes from at least 4 previous books coming together here.

Stole an Airplane joke though.  Terry Pratchett = cancelled for plagarism. :laugh:

Offline starnado

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1041 on: July 03, 2019, 06:07:03 AM »
Been reading a bit more lately.

I read all 4 Hyperion books by Dan Simmons.  In addition to being very interestingly and capably put together and intricately plotted, they were VERY emotionally impactful for me.  I have no idea how I missed them when they were new - I was an active reader of everything SF I could get my hands on in the period in which they were released.

I read the second NK Jemisin book The Obelisk Gate, which also kicked me in the metaphorical balls, just like the first one did.

I re-read the Death Gate Cycle, a seven-book 90s fantasy series, to see how it held up.  It held up the way I remembered - a wonderful and fascinating premise, that starts out very strong, and ends with a whimper.  I can remember almost scene-by-scene how the first 3 books play out (and have been able to remember it vividly since the 90s when I first read it), but I can barely remember how it ends and I just finished it a couple months ago.  Basically everything beyond the introduction of the "dragon-snakes" is mostly forgettable.  One of the most prominent cases of "awesome idea/disappointing follow-through" in a genre full of that phenomenon.

I'm on the second one (Fall of Hyperion) right now.  It took a while to get into the first one, but I ended up really enjoying it.

I am so glad that others are reading them now. I loved loved loved them but every time I recommend them to people I worry if they will like them, as if I wrote them myself.

I did not write them myself so I should not actually care that much (but I do).

I still feel a little uncomfortable about
(click to show/hide)
but it treads just on the borderline of okay-ness so I accept it. Also she is
(click to show/hide)

It surprises me how many fans of sci-fi have not read these books. Great world-building and a mix of hard science with cod philosophy.

Swagomatic - don't stop. The third and fourth books are quite different in style, format and content. Where the first two are The Canterbury Tales and The Wizard of Oz, the third and fourth are a travel book and a philosophical treatise. Palin and Siddhartha? Something like that. It all ties up quite nicely IMHO.
'The little, stupid differences are nothing next to the big, stupid similarities'
Bart Simpson

Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1042 on: July 03, 2019, 12:22:05 PM »
Been reading a bit more lately.

I read all 4 Hyperion books by Dan Simmons.  In addition to being very interestingly and capably put together and intricately plotted, they were VERY emotionally impactful for me.  I have no idea how I missed them when they were new - I was an active reader of everything SF I could get my hands on in the period in which they were released.

I read the second NK Jemisin book The Obelisk Gate, which also kicked me in the metaphorical balls, just like the first one did.

I re-read the Death Gate Cycle, a seven-book 90s fantasy series, to see how it held up.  It held up the way I remembered - a wonderful and fascinating premise, that starts out very strong, and ends with a whimper.  I can remember almost scene-by-scene how the first 3 books play out (and have been able to remember it vividly since the 90s when I first read it), but I can barely remember how it ends and I just finished it a couple months ago.  Basically everything beyond the introduction of the "dragon-snakes" is mostly forgettable.  One of the most prominent cases of "awesome idea/disappointing follow-through" in a genre full of that phenomenon.

I'm on the second one (Fall of Hyperion) right now.  It took a while to get into the first one, but I ended up really enjoying it.

I am so glad that others are reading them now. I loved loved loved them but every time I recommend them to people I worry if they will like them, as if I wrote them myself.

I did not write them myself so I should not actually care that much (but I do).

I still feel a little uncomfortable about
(click to show/hide)
but it treads just on the borderline of okay-ness so I accept it. Also she is
(click to show/hide)

It surprises me how many fans of sci-fi have not read these books. Great world-building and a mix of hard science with cod philosophy.

Swagomatic - don't stop. The third and fourth books are quite different in style, format and content. Where the first two are The Canterbury Tales and The Wizard of Oz, the third and fourth are a travel book and a philosophical treatise. Palin and Siddhartha? Something like that. It all ties up quite nicely IMHO.

I just finished the third book, and I was confused, I was glad when I found out that there was a fourth book.  That will be my next one.  There are tons of threads hanging after the third book.

One thing
(click to show/hide)
 
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

Online amysrevenge

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1043 on: July 03, 2019, 01:06:27 PM »
One thing
(click to show/hide)


I figured
(click to show/hide)
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Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1044 on: July 03, 2019, 03:25:18 PM »
One thing
(click to show/hide)


I figured
(click to show/hide)

(click to show/hide)
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

Offline starnado

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1045 on: July 04, 2019, 06:24:20 AM »
One thing
(click to show/hide)


I figured
(click to show/hide)

(click to show/hide)

(click to show/hide)
'The little, stupid differences are nothing next to the big, stupid similarities'
Bart Simpson

Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1046 on: July 08, 2019, 12:21:22 PM »
One thing
(click to show/hide)


I figured
(click to show/hide)

(click to show/hide)

(click to show/hide)

(click to show/hide)
:)
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1047 on: July 08, 2019, 02:40:41 PM »
On the subject of hyperion, its one of the books I've picked up maybe a half dozen times and just haven't been able to get past the first few chapters. 

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1048 on: July 09, 2019, 04:49:45 AM »
"How to Change Your Mind", Michael Pollan.  10/10.  Pollan doesn't disappoint.  His brilliant prose and insightful dive into the world of psychedelics and psychedelic therapy is fascinating.  I highly recommend this book.
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1049 on: July 12, 2019, 03:27:15 AM »
Unseen Academicals, Terry Pratchett - 8/10

Comedic novel about social class and soccer. If you're a soccer fan, probably a good starter for Terry Pratchett novels. I laughed a lot, and of course it has the usual amount of Pratchett encouraging you to be basically good to other people and not stress about the small stuff. Gods do I miss that man.
Strange women lying in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government.

 

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