Author Topic: Rate the last book you just read  (Read 75618 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Sawyer

  • Seasoned Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 840
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #885 on: October 31, 2017, 09:28:18 PM »
Hey fantasy nerds.  I'm finally doing Discworld.  Two down, forty something to go!

Should I be doing these publication order, "series" order, or try to follow that crazy flow chart I've seen floating around?


Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2316
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #886 on: November 01, 2017, 08:31:49 AM »
Almost Human*, by Lee Berger, Wits. U. A brief chronicle and explanation of the finds at the Malapa hominin site (Australopithecus sediba) and the Rising Star cave system (Homo naledi). Lee's team recovered two well preserved skeleton (child and adult woman) at Malapa, and extracted over 1,500 bones from the Dinaledi chamber at the Rising Star site. Lee is one of the leaders in the "open research" movement among paleoarchaeologists. He's made all the teams' discoveries available for study online, including 3D printer information. It's a quick read, aimed at the neophyte such as me.

*No rating, I couldn't give a dispassionate number. I've watched the NatGeo/PBS special at least a dozen times.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline wastrel

  • Great poster... or greatest poster?
  • Technical Administrator
  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • *****
  • Posts: 12445
  • Science: A cold-hearted bitch with a 14" strap-on
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #887 on: November 01, 2017, 11:42:05 AM »
Hey fantasy nerds.  I'm finally doing Discworld.  Two down, forty something to go!

Should I be doing these publication order, "series" order, or try to follow that crazy flow chart I've seen floating around?

The flow chart will put the sub-series in the right order, so it is worth glancing at.  Each set of characters have their own arcs that play out over multiple books

That said, every book is completely stand alone.  You might miss a reference or two, but the story itself will still make sense, even if you read out of order.

Offline Swagomatic

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2426
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #888 on: November 01, 2017, 12:30:58 PM »
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes.

I can't recommend this enough.  It's a fantastic blend of narrative, history and science.  It's very well written and packed with information.  It also carries a massive emotional punch.  I found it because it was recommended within the pages of The Disappearing Spoon, another excellent book.
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2316
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #889 on: November 01, 2017, 12:34:15 PM »
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes.

I can't recommend this enough.  It's a fantastic blend of narrative, history and science.  It's very well written and packed with information.  It also carries a massive emotional punch.  I found it because it was recommended within the pages of The Disappearing Spoon, another excellent book.
Second that. He's useful for dispelling the "we only had two bombs!" myths.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline Swagomatic

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2426
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #890 on: November 01, 2017, 01:30:52 PM »
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes.

I can't recommend this enough.  It's a fantastic blend of narrative, history and science.  It's very well written and packed with information.  It also carries a massive emotional punch.  I found it because it was recommended within the pages of The Disappearing Spoon, another excellent book.
Second that. He's useful for dispelling the "we only had two bombs!" myths.

Definitely, that was one of the most surprising details that I learned.
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

Offline Drunken Idaho

  • Natural Blonde
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9678
  • Comrade Questions
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #891 on: November 01, 2017, 07:15:31 PM »
Hey fantasy nerds.  I'm finally doing Discworld.  Two down, forty something to go!

Should I be doing these publication order, "series" order, or try to follow that crazy flow chart I've seen floating around?

The flow chart will put the sub-series in the right order, so it is worth glancing at.  Each set of characters have their own arcs that play out over multiple books

That said, every book is completely stand alone.  You might miss a reference or two, but the story itself will still make sense, even if you read out of order.

Exactly what he said.
Strange women lying in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government.

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2316
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #892 on: November 01, 2017, 07:37:51 PM »
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes.

I can't recommend this enough.  It's a fantastic blend of narrative, history and science.  It's very well written and packed with information.  It also carries a massive emotional punch.  I found it because it was recommended within the pages of The Disappearing Spoon, another excellent book.
Second that. He's useful for dispelling the "we only had two bombs!" myths.

Definitely, that was one of the most surprising details that I learned.
Gen. Marshall was to be given control of ten atomic bombs for use during the invasion of Japan. The November and June invasion dates required that at least one bomb a month be built.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline Swagomatic

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2426
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #893 on: November 01, 2017, 07:57:18 PM »
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes.

I can't recommend this enough.  It's a fantastic blend of narrative, history and science.  It's very well written and packed with information.  It also carries a massive emotional punch.  I found it because it was recommended within the pages of The Disappearing Spoon, another excellent book.
Second that. He's useful for dispelling the "we only had two bombs!" myths.

Definitely, that was one of the most surprising details that I learned.
Gen. Marshall was to be given control of ten atomic bombs for use during the invasion of Japan. The November and June invasion dates required that at least one bomb a month be built.
Didn't it say that they would produce enough fissionable material for a critical mass every 3 weeks?
 
Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.
---George Bernard Shaw

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2316
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #894 on: November 01, 2017, 07:59:14 PM »
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes.

I can't recommend this enough.  It's a fantastic blend of narrative, history and science.  It's very well written and packed with information.  It also carries a massive emotional punch.  I found it because it was recommended within the pages of The Disappearing Spoon, another excellent book.
Second that. He's useful for dispelling the "we only had two bombs!" myths.

Definitely, that was one of the most surprising details that I learned.
Gen. Marshall was to be given control of ten atomic bombs for use during the invasion of Japan. The November and June invasion dates required that at least one bomb a month be built.
Didn't it say that they would produce enough fissionable material for a critical mass every 3 weeks?
My copy's in the basement, effectively out of reach for a few weeks. The Truman Library has the minutes of the planning meeting online. Interesting reading.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline SQ the ΣΛ/IGMд

  • Atheist extraordinaire
  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 12307
  • Pondering the cosmos since 1969
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #895 on: November 13, 2017, 05:44:33 PM »
The Essential Tales of H.P. Lovecraft

Good stories but Lovecraft gets a little wordy at times.
"That's ridiculous, spooks. That's silly!" ~ The Tin Woodsman - The Wizard of Oz ~

"Like it or not, we are stuck with science.  We had better make the best of it." ~ Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World ~

Offline John Albert

  • Frequent Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2318
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #896 on: November 13, 2017, 09:41:27 PM »
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes.

I can't recommend this enough.  It's a fantastic blend of narrative, history and science.  It's very well written and packed with information.  It also carries a massive emotional punch.

I read that one 15 years ago. Fantastic book. May have been the single best work of historical non-fiction I've ever read. I think maybe I'm due for a reread of it.

Offline junki

  • Off to a Start
  • *
  • Posts: 35
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #897 on: November 14, 2017, 02:44:08 AM »
I've only read Making and Dark Sun, so far. Biblio in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Rhodes shows plenty more. Thanks for reminding!

For some reason, Dava Sobel popped to my mind. She has not touched nuclear history? Anyway, Longitude (about Harrison and his clocks) sounds interesting. Also, James Mahaffey has couple of interesting books about nuclear accidents, including minor mishaps, less known ones.

Juha

« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 03:03:19 AM by junki »

Online Jaloopa

  • The Number You Are Thinking Of
  • *
  • Posts: 69
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #898 on: November 14, 2017, 04:06:03 AM »
The Essential Tales of H.P. Lovecraft

Good stories but Lovecraft gets a little wordy at times.

I got the complete Lovecraft a while back. It's not a collection you can really read in one go, especially since his language and style is already starting to be quite archaic. At his best though, he was capable of some really creepy writing

Offline SQ the ΣΛ/IGMд

  • Atheist extraordinaire
  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 12307
  • Pondering the cosmos since 1969
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #899 on: November 14, 2017, 08:55:02 PM »
The Essential Tales of H.P. Lovecraft

Good stories but Lovecraft gets a little wordy at times.

I got the complete Lovecraft a while back. It's not a collection you can really read in one go, especially since his language and style is already starting to be quite archaic. At his best though, he was capable of some really creepy writing

They were definitely creepy.
A while back I read The Writer's Handbook to help me become better at my story telling. Stephen King says in that book that if you need to use a thesaurus to find the right word then it's the wrong word. Tell the story how it falls in your head. Don't try to impress. I think Lovecraft used a lot of advanced wording when simply telling the story in laymen terms maybe would have made it easier to read. I have a pretty advanced education, am articulate and enunciate well and still had a hard time with it.
Maybe it's his style or maybe that was the trend of authors in his day but I found it to be taxing.
"That's ridiculous, spooks. That's silly!" ~ The Tin Woodsman - The Wizard of Oz ~

"Like it or not, we are stuck with science.  We had better make the best of it." ~ Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World ~

 

personate-rain