Author Topic: Rate the last book you just read  (Read 109324 times)

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Offline Nosmas

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1035 on: June 06, 2019, 04:47:33 PM »
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. 9/10

Normally I want more action out of my novels but I decided to dive into it after reading the countless reviews giving it praise. I really enjoyed it. It's extremely character driven and the story does not include much in the way of travelling to new places or action with high stakes. It still sucked me in. My mass produced paperback copy was over 700 pages and I didn't skim through any of them. I finished it last week and I'm already about 100 pages into the sequel.

Unfortunately the author seems to have hit a wall with the third and final novel as fans have been waiting 8 years for it and the author still hasn't committed to a release year. So I expect to be frustrated by that assuming I enjoy the second novel as much as the first.

LOL, buckle up! ETA:  There is "The Slow Regard of Silent Things," which is listed as book 2.5.  I have not read it, but my son has, and he enjoyed it.  It concerns the character, Auri.

I'm having a weird reaction to the story. I want the protagonist to grow up and become the bad ass they keep saying he will become but I also enjoy the story of him as a kid in the university. The books are extremely heavy on foreshadowing and I think that hooks me even more.

I think Kvothe as a character is my main draw to these books so I wonder if I would enjoy a book about another character as much. But it's worth consideration if I need to consume more of the world while waiting for book 3.
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Offline Swagomatic

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1036 on: June 06, 2019, 05:39:00 PM »
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. 9/10

Normally I want more action out of my novels but I decided to dive into it after reading the countless reviews giving it praise. I really enjoyed it. It's extremely character driven and the story does not include much in the way of travelling to new places or action with high stakes. It still sucked me in. My mass produced paperback copy was over 700 pages and I didn't skim through any of them. I finished it last week and I'm already about 100 pages into the sequel.

Unfortunately the author seems to have hit a wall with the third and final novel as fans have been waiting 8 years for it and the author still hasn't committed to a release year. So I expect to be frustrated by that assuming I enjoy the second novel as much as the first.

LOL, buckle up! ETA:  There is "The Slow Regard of Silent Things," which is listed as book 2.5.  I have not read it, but my son has, and he enjoyed it.  It concerns the character, Auri.

I'm having a weird reaction to the story. I want the protagonist to grow up and become the bad ass they keep saying he will become but I also enjoy the story of him as a kid in the university. The books are extremely heavy on foreshadowing and I think that hooks me even more.

I think Kvothe as a character is my main draw to these books so I wonder if I would enjoy a book about another character as much. But it's worth consideration if I need to consume more of the world while waiting for book 3.
Yeah, that's kind of why I haven't read it yet.
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1037 on: June 07, 2019, 03:48:42 AM »
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. 9/10

Normally I want more action out of my novels but I decided to dive into it after reading the countless reviews giving it praise. I really enjoyed it. It's extremely character driven and the story does not include much in the way of travelling to new places or action with high stakes. It still sucked me in. My mass produced paperback copy was over 700 pages and I didn't skim through any of them. I finished it last week and I'm already about 100 pages into the sequel.

Unfortunately the author seems to have hit a wall with the third and final novel as fans have been waiting 8 years for it and the author still hasn't committed to a release year. So I expect to be frustrated by that assuming I enjoy the second novel as much as the first.

LOL, buckle up! ETA:  There is "The Slow Regard of Silent Things," which is listed as book 2.5.  I have not read it, but my son has, and he enjoyed it.  It concerns the character, Auri.

I'm having a weird reaction to the story. I want the protagonist to grow up and become the bad ass they keep saying he will become but I also enjoy the story of him as a kid in the university. The books are extremely heavy on foreshadowing and I think that hooks me even more.

I think Kvothe as a character is my main draw to these books so I wonder if I would enjoy a book about another character as much. But it's worth consideration if I need to consume more of the world while waiting for book 3.
Yeah, that's kind of why I haven't read it yet.

I've heard that Rothfuss and GRR Martin have a bet that neither one can finish their next book until the other author dies.


*I haven't actually heard that, but come on guys, give us what we want!!
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Online Sawyer

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1038 on: June 10, 2019, 10:44:40 PM »
Somehow I managed to read four books in a row starting with "M" (kind of, if you go by the series name).

Mosquito by Andrew Spielman
6/10
Would be fun as a starting point to learn about mosquito biology and disease vectors, but not enough detail for someone obsessive about entomology.  Nice coverage of how the malaria eradication leaders were way too optimistic that pesticides were a magic bullet.



(Red) Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson
6/10
Went from being boring to being amazing to boring to amazing again, then maybe ended on boring?  With the exception of the space elevator, most of the hard sci-fi technological discussions could not hold my attention very long.  The real meat and potatoes of the story is seeing how the, shall we say, "apolitical" scientists on Mars are not able to grasp what's going on around them and how to respond to it.  I'll probably try book 2 in the series at some point.



Medical Detectives by Berton Roueche
9/10
Fantastic.  The blurb on the dust jacket of my edition alludes to the TV show House, and reading many of the essays feels like your own little personal journey as a contrarian diagnostician.  After hours of listening to my favorite parasitism podcast, I was happy to get the one "worm" case correct.  And apparently there's a bunch of buildings in New York (?) that still have anthrax spores in them, and only city planners and major hospitals know about them, and we're relying that they don't forget to mention this every time there's a demolition project?   :-\



Moby Dick by Herman Mellvile
I was prepared for the worst.  I knew it would be a cure for insomnia.  I knew about the infamous whale anatomy chapters.   But .... it was pretty damn good. 
9/10
The one thing that took me by complete surprise how funny Ishmael is, both in his general temperament and occasionally with some real zingers.  At one point in the cetology chapter, he proclaims that smaller whale-like fish aren't whales because, well, they just don't inspire enough awe.  "I deny their credentials as whales; and have presented them with their passports to quit the Kingdom of Cetology".  Several people keep calling Queequeg 'Quohog', which for some reason made me chuckle.  There's also the classic "dishonest translator" bit in later chapters that I've seen frequently in television and movies, and I'm now curious about its true origins.

I would absolutely hate having to read this for a high-school literature class though.  When I could follow Melville's descriptions and metaphors properly they could be beautiful, but when I got lost I just plowed ahead without stressing too much about what I might be missing.  In some ways the writing reminded me of the Blood Meridian in the laboriously long, meandering sentences and the constant confusion of who was talking, but somehow I never got as frustrated will Melville as I did with McCarthey.  The one other thing that allowed me to appreciate the intricate whale talk was knowing when Moby Dick was published relative to the scientific work of Linnaeus, Cuvier, Darwin, etc.  There's an acknowledgement that earlier 18th and 19th century naturalists who studied the seas could vary quite a bit in their devotion to objectivity and thorough work, and even some hints that they have yet to unearth the deeper connections between man and whale.  Sure, it can all be written off as metaphor, but there's one particular passage about seeing the bones in a whale fin and a human hand, and wondering how they could be so similar.

Offline fuzzyMarmot

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Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1039 on: June 11, 2019, 02:03:27 AM »
If you haven't read it yet, Nathaniel Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea is a great (non-fiction) account of the shipwreck of the Essex, which inspired Melville.

 

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