Author Topic: Rate the last book you just read  (Read 119950 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline lonely moa

  • A rather tough old bird.
  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5038
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1065 on: November 04, 2019, 05:13:13 AM »
"Deep Nutrition", Dr Cate Shanahan 10/10.  The team doctor for the Lakers.  A great primer for anyone wanting to bring a healthy child into the world.

Steve Novella should read this. 
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline Harry Black

  • International Man of Mystery
  • Global Moderator
  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • *****
  • Posts: 16964
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1066 on: November 06, 2019, 08:20:57 AM »
On the Clock by Emily Guendelsberger 8/10

Really great book about low wage jobs and what they do to people physically, emotionally, psychologically and socially.
The author goes to work at an Amazon warehouse, a call centre and a McDonalds. She presents her own experiences which are great and funny and she also presents interviews with co-workers. The interviews balance out the picture as we meet some workers in each industry that really like their jobs and have good things to say about their employers.
She also looks into the history of modern managment theory for low skilled workers and how that has evolved with technology to bring us to where we are now.
I learned a lot from the book though the parts that mirrored my own experiences were hard to get through and quite depressing. Usually Im struck by the things someone misses about my own experience but this writer nailed them a bit too well. She compares working teenage service jobs in the late 90s to what is expected of McDonalds workers today and how the staffing algorithm keeps them constantly under pressure and busy and in a state of uncertainty about their schedule.
If you have never worked one of these jobs or havent worked one in 10 years then I think this book is absolutely essential reading to understand the people you deal with every day without thinking about it.
The points I knocked off were just for a couple of narrative illustrations that didnt really work for me and a bit too much emphasis on the evolutionary side of adrenal response and stress at times.

Online Sawyer

  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1579
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1067 on: November 12, 2019, 08:48:43 AM »
Witches are real, people. 

I picked up another Discworld from the library, but on the way out spotted Randall Munroe's new book, How To.  I started on Maskerade, and after about 50 pages into Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg arguing with one another, I thought I needed a break and picked up the Munroe book.  And guess who shows up in a non-fiction book that's mostly about engineering?  Granny goddamn Weatherwax, that's who.  And in a section of the book that felt oddly out of place, almost like she's willfully forced her way in.   :-\

Checkmate, skeptics.



How To is okay but not as enjoyable as Munroe's previous books.  I'm glad I checked it out instead of putting it on my Christmas list.  The best section of the book was probably how to build a lava moat around your house.

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5128
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1068 on: November 15, 2019, 10:17:07 AM »
The Martian, by Andy Weir. I read my first scifi book* the year JFK was (informally) promoted to sainthood. Lots of "hard scifi" since then and I have to say that this book is the best of that niche since The Mote in God's Eye. Luckily for Andy, he had an untold number of nerds checking his math during the writing process. And that writing process has become the subject matter of certain Uni Lit. classes. I doubt the process can be reproduced because there was a large Topsy factor involved. In any case it's a fun read if you don't want dragons in your fiction.  ;) 

Oh, and if you think the movie covered much of the material in the book I STRONGLY suggest you read the book. I don't know if it's still free online.

*Bullard of the Space Patrol
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Online arthwollipot

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9440
  • Observer of Phenomena
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1069 on: November 18, 2019, 08:35:42 PM »
Let me give you my theory on Harry Potter, since I've just re-read the series again. You might be able to tell that I'm a fan.

I think a lot of people don't like the Potter series for the following reason. The titular protagonist of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (nonsensically changed to Sorcerer's Stone in the USA) is eleven years old. And that's the target demographic - the book is written at an eleven year old reading level. I think some people expect it to be a little less simplistic and childish and are disappointed and don't go on to the subsequent books.

The titular protagonist of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is twelve years old, and the book is written at that level. There's not a great deal of difference between that and the eleven year level, and I think some people try to give it another go and fail again.

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is written at the thirteen-year-old level, though it does start to introduce some darker themes. Each book follows Harry over the course of a school year, and the reader can be expected to grow and age alongside. Although I think JK managed to mess up the timing of the release of the books when they started getting longer. Goblet of Fire, at age fourteen, starts to bring in some seriously dark themes, and the story just gets darker and more complex and intense from there.

It really is a good piece of storytelling, adjusting the age of the intended reader to align with the age of the protagonist, and people who read only the first couple of books and set the series aside because it's disappointing are missing out on the deeper, darker story that underpins the whole thing. I give it four and a half stars.
Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him.

Online amysrevenge

  • Baseball-Cap-Beard-Baby Guy
  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 6083
  • The Warhammeriest
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1070 on: November 20, 2019, 11:58:30 AM »
The Emperor's Blades, Brian Staveley

Was the free e-book from the Tor email list a couple months ago, and well worth the price (haha).

A coming of age story for three siblings in wildly different circumstances.  I quite liked it, and will be picking up the two sequels in the near future.  So well done Tor, you will have gotten the price of two books out of me.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2019, 12:15:14 PM by amysrevenge »
Big Mike
Grande Prairie AB Canada

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5128
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1071 on: November 20, 2019, 12:13:32 PM »
Let me give you my theory on Harry Potter, since I've just re-read the series again. You might be able to tell that I'm a fan.

I think a lot of people don't like the Potter series for the following reason. The titular protagonist of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (nonsensically changed to Sorcerer's Stone in the USA) is eleven years old. And that's the target demographic - the book is written at an eleven year old reading level. I think some people expect it to be a little less simplistic and childish and are disappointed and don't go on to the subsequent books.

The titular protagonist of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is twelve years old, and the book is written at that level. There's not a great deal of difference between that and the eleven year level, and I think some people try to give it another go and fail again.

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is written at the thirteen-year-old level, though it does start to introduce some darker themes. Each book follows Harry over the course of a school year, and the reader can be expected to grow and age alongside. Although I think JK managed to mess up the timing of the release of the books when they started getting longer. Goblet of Fire, at age fourteen, starts to bring in some seriously dark themes, and the story just gets darker and more complex and intense from there.

It really is a good piece of storytelling, adjusting the age of the intended reader to align with the age of the protagonist, and people who read only the first couple of books and set the series aside because it's disappointing are missing out on the deeper, darker story that underpins the whole thing. I give it four and a half stars.
Lots of adult criticize children's books. Funny to watch them.

I read the HP books because my 3rd wife was going to be a children's librarian. She wanted someone with whom she could argue about the books and speculate about the next one. Only movies I've ever seen on opening day, other than the LOTR trilogy.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Online arthwollipot

  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9440
  • Observer of Phenomena
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1072 on: November 20, 2019, 08:27:20 PM »
Lots of adult criticize children's books. Funny to watch them.

I read the HP books because my 3rd wife was going to be a children's librarian. She wanted someone with whom she could argue about the books and speculate about the next one. Only movies I've ever seen on opening day, other than the LOTR trilogy.

I saw the first movie first, then decided to actually read the book, and found out (though I should have expected it) just how much detail there is about the world. It sucked me in.
Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him.

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5128
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1073 on: November 21, 2019, 05:42:13 AM »
Lots of adult criticize children's books. Funny to watch them.

I read the HP books because my 3rd wife was going to be a children's librarian. She wanted someone with whom she could argue about the books and speculate about the next one. Only movies I've ever seen on opening day, other than the LOTR trilogy.

I saw the first movie first, then decided to actually read the book, and found out (though I should have expected it) just how much detail there is about the world. It sucked me in.
It sprang from the forehead of J.K. whole.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Online Sawyer

  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1579
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1074 on: December 05, 2019, 11:04:57 AM »
Feet of Clay (Discword #19)






I felt like this one was written personally for me, right now, from Terry Pratchett's ghost.  Not so much that it was better than other Discworld novels, but because of a huge coincidence that put me in the shoes of Commander Vimes.  Massive spoilers, some personal backstory, and a tiny bit of environmental science ahead.

(click to show/hide)

Offline daniel1948

  • Happy Man in a Boat
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9572
  • I'd rather be paddling
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1075 on: December 05, 2019, 01:27:00 PM »
Let me give you my theory on Harry Potter... <snip>

When these books came out I was interested and wanted to read them. But they were not available on Kindle, and by that time my eyes had such a hard time reading print books that I was not willing to read the print versions. I was very angry at Rowling for not allowing the books to be released on Kindle. I don't know her reason, but at the time I supposed it was because she was an anti-e-reader bigot who believed the "feel" of a book was essential.

So I didn't read them until much later when they finally did come out on Kindle.

My feeling was that she is an excellent writer but only a mediocre storyteller. I enjoyed the books, but they would not reach even the bottom of my list of the 100 best books. Assuming I could remember the names of 100 books in my senility. However, they rate well above most of what passes for sci-fi nowadays. She writes about magic and calls it magic without trying to claim it's somehow scientific. That counts for something. I enjoy fantasy. I hate it when science is misrepresented as making magic possible.
Daniel
----------------
"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline daniel1948

  • Happy Man in a Boat
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9572
  • I'd rather be paddling
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1076 on: December 05, 2019, 01:34:16 PM »
The Martian, by Andy Weir. I read my first scifi book* the year JFK was (informally) promoted to sainthood. Lots of "hard scifi" since then and I have to say that this book is the best of that niche since The Mote in God's Eye. Luckily for Andy, he had an untold number of nerds checking his math during the writing process. And that writing process has become the subject matter of certain Uni Lit. classes. I doubt the process can be reproduced because there was a large Topsy factor involved. In any case it's a fun read if you don't want dragons in your fiction.  ;) 

Oh, and if you think the movie covered much of the material in the book I STRONGLY suggest you read the book. I don't know if it's still free online.

*Bullard of the Space Patrol

I tried to read the book but found the format intolerably dull. I was also annoyed that a book promoted as "getting the science right" had so much anti-science in it.

(click to show/hide)

This was not a "scientifically accurate" story.
Daniel
----------------
"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5128
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1077 on: December 05, 2019, 01:36:26 PM »
Let me give you my theory on Harry Potter... <snip>

When these books came out I was interested and wanted to read them. But they were not available on Kindle, and by that time my eyes had such a hard time reading print books that I was not willing to read the print versions. I was very angry at Rowling for not allowing the books to be released on Kindle. I don't know her reason, but at the time I supposed it was because she was an anti-e-reader bigot who believed the "feel" of a book was essential.

So I didn't read them until much later when they finally did come out on Kindle.

My feeling was that she is an excellent writer but only a mediocre storyteller. I enjoyed the books, but they would not reach even the bottom of my list of the 100 best books. Assuming I could remember the names of 100 books in my senility. However, they rate well above most of what passes for sci-fi nowadays. She writes about magic and calls it magic without trying to claim it's somehow scientific. That counts for something. I enjoy fantasy. I hate it when science is misrepresented as making magic possible.
They are aimed at children. They should be considered on that basis. The Tales of Beetle the Bard also.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Online Noisy Rhysling

  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 5128
    • Hyperwar, WWII in Hypertext.
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1078 on: December 05, 2019, 01:38:28 PM »
The science was crowd sourced for the most part, but some things were necessary to the story. In the end he was far more accurate than 99% of "hard scifi" stories I've read.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline daniel1948

  • Happy Man in a Boat
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *********
  • Posts: 9572
  • I'd rather be paddling
Re: Rate the last book you just read
« Reply #1079 on: December 05, 2019, 03:18:36 PM »
The science was crowd sourced for the most part, but some things were necessary to the story. In the end he was far more accurate than 99% of "hard scifi" stories I've read.

Nothing is "necessary to the story" because the author makes up the story. If an author cannot think of a suitable story element, then s/he is not a good storyteller. And if The Martian is more accurate than 99% of hard sci-fi, that speaks to the dismal state of hard sci-fi. I've been roundly criticized for this before, but I'll say it again anyway: If you're going to write fantasy, call it fantasy.
Daniel
----------------
"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck