Author Topic: Beyond Burger 2.0  (Read 6118 times)

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Offline Calinthalus

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #435 on: December 07, 2019, 08:36:09 AM »
The thing is, I didn't say it would make no difference.  I said it would matter a whole lot.  A measly enough return for me not to bother.  I also didn't say nobody should make any changes. I've already made some changes, I'm just not willing to make that specific change at this time.  Others can make whatever changes suit them.

Of course you can do whatever you want to do.  You’re sufficiently anonymous that being ‘shamed’ here for continuing to eat meat has no consequences for you.  Although, if your profile is right and you live in Keavy, Kentucky you don’t have the cop out of claiming that the cattle in your area aren’t being grazed on land unsuitable for any other use.  Looking at Google Earth, Keavy looks to be in a very beautiful area with a lot of green (?pastures), forests, lakes and rivers.
The amount of corn we produce for the bourbon trade is pretty large.  Most of the cattle graze on pasture land that would be difficult to farm on.  The soil is fine, but the land is rolling at a fair pitch that would make planting and harvesting pretty hard.  I don't know if that's the same the further north or west you go where the land flattens out. I'm on the cusp of the cumberlands here.  Anyway, the land that they graze on now was fine for growing tobacco but not corn or beans.  Something about the way they are havested.  The tobacco trade is dying a slow death.  We are trying to bring hemp on.  They say it grows well here.


I hate the way we raise chickens here. It's the same as everywhere else and horrible.
"I think computer viruses should count as life. Maybe it says something about human nature, that the only form of life we have created so far is purely destructive. Talk about creating life in our own image."
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Offline Calinthalus

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #436 on: December 07, 2019, 08:46:45 AM »
Also, I haven't been on google earth in a long time and I just went and found my house.  It looks like a hillbilly compound with vehicles and barns and shit everywhere.


I don't know when these pictures were taken.  My uncle is here so it's not winter....but all of the corn/bean fields look plowed but not planted.  You can see the ones left fallow for hay/grass vs. the ones they are going to grow crops in that year.  It's pretty fascinating to look at.
"I think computer viruses should count as life. Maybe it says something about human nature, that the only form of life we have created so far is purely destructive. Talk about creating life in our own image."
--Stephen Hawking

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #437 on: December 07, 2019, 03:38:36 PM »
The thing is, I didn't say it would make no difference.  I said it would matter a whole lot.  A measly enough return for me not to bother.  I also didn't say nobody should make any changes. I've already made some changes, I'm just not willing to make that specific change at this time.  Others can make whatever changes suit them.

Of course you can do whatever you want to do.  You’re sufficiently anonymous that being ‘shamed’ here for continuing to eat meat has no consequences for you.  Although, if your profile is right and you live in Keavy, Kentucky you don’t have the cop out of claiming that the cattle in your area aren’t being grazed on land unsuitable for any other use.  Looking at Google Earth, Keavy looks to be in a very beautiful area with a lot of green (?pastures), forests, lakes and rivers.
The amount of corn we produce for the bourbon trade is pretty large.  Most of the cattle graze on pasture land that would be difficult to farm on.  The soil is fine, but the land is rolling at a fair pitch that would make planting and harvesting pretty hard.  I don't know if that's the same the further north or west you go where the land flattens out. I'm on the cusp of the cumberlands here.  Anyway, the land that they graze on now was fine for growing tobacco but not corn or beans.  Something about the way they are havested.  The tobacco trade is dying a slow death.  We are trying to bring hemp on.  They say it grows well here.


I hate the way we raise chickens here. It's the same as everywhere else and horrible.

Hemp seems to grow well everywhere:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

It seems to be a wonder crop, all of which can be used for many purposes.  It’s got a bad reputation because of the varieties that contain psychoactive drugs.  The growing of industrial hemp should be encouraged.

I regularly look at my house on Google Earth, but mainly to work out the best routes to get to places.  It also includes a public transport function telling me when the next bus is supposed to be arriving at the closest bus stop (and it’s usually out by 1 or 2 minutes which isn’t bad).
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #438 on: December 07, 2019, 04:30:47 PM »
The thing is, I didn't say it would make no difference.  I said it would matter a whole lot.  A measly enough return for me not to bother.  I also didn't say nobody should make any changes. I've already made some changes, I'm just not willing to make that specific change at this time.  Others can make whatever changes suit them.

Of course you can do whatever you want to do.  You’re sufficiently anonymous that being ‘shamed’ here for continuing to eat meat has no consequences for you.  Although, if your profile is right and you live in Keavy, Kentucky you don’t have the cop out of claiming that the cattle in your area aren’t being grazed on land unsuitable for any other use.  Looking at Google Earth, Keavy looks to be in a very beautiful area with a lot of green (?pastures), forests, lakes and rivers.
The amount of corn we produce for the bourbon trade is pretty large.  Most of the cattle graze on pasture land that would be difficult to farm on.  The soil is fine, but the land is rolling at a fair pitch that would make planting and harvesting pretty hard.  I don't know if that's the same the further north or west you go where the land flattens out. I'm on the cusp of the cumberlands here.  Anyway, the land that they graze on now was fine for growing tobacco but not corn or beans.  Something about the way they are havested.  The tobacco trade is dying a slow death.  We are trying to bring hemp on.  They say it grows well here.


I hate the way we raise chickens here. It's the same as everywhere else and horrible.

Hemp seems to grow well everywhere:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

It seems to be a wonder crop, all of which can be used for many purposes.  It’s got a bad reputation because of the varieties that contain psychoactive drugs.  The growing of industrial hemp should be encouraged.

I regularly look at my house on Google Earth, but mainly to work out the best routes to get to places.  It also includes a public transport function telling me when the next bus is supposed to be arriving at the closest bus stop (and it’s usually out by 1 or 2 minutes which isn’t bad).

I wonder if all these magical and wonderful properties that are attributed to hemp are not pushed and exaggerated by those who enjoy the psychoactive properties of some varieties.
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #439 on: December 07, 2019, 04:36:33 PM »
The thing is, I didn't say it would make no difference.  I said it would matter a whole lot.  A measly enough return for me not to bother.  I also didn't say nobody should make any changes. I've already made some changes, I'm just not willing to make that specific change at this time.  Others can make whatever changes suit them.

Of course you can do whatever you want to do.  You’re sufficiently anonymous that being ‘shamed’ here for continuing to eat meat has no consequences for you.  Although, if your profile is right and you live in Keavy, Kentucky you don’t have the cop out of claiming that the cattle in your area aren’t being grazed on land unsuitable for any other use.  Looking at Google Earth, Keavy looks to be in a very beautiful area with a lot of green (?pastures), forests, lakes and rivers.
The amount of corn we produce for the bourbon trade is pretty large.  Most of the cattle graze on pasture land that would be difficult to farm on.  The soil is fine, but the land is rolling at a fair pitch that would make planting and harvesting pretty hard.  I don't know if that's the same the further north or west you go where the land flattens out. I'm on the cusp of the cumberlands here.  Anyway, the land that they graze on now was fine for growing tobacco but not corn or beans.  Something about the way they are havested.  The tobacco trade is dying a slow death.  We are trying to bring hemp on.  They say it grows well here.


I hate the way we raise chickens here. It's the same as everywhere else and horrible.

Hemp seems to grow well everywhere:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

It seems to be a wonder crop, all of which can be used for many purposes.  It’s got a bad reputation because of the varieties that contain psychoactive drugs.  The growing of industrial hemp should be encouraged.

I regularly look at my house on Google Earth, but mainly to work out the best routes to get to places.  It also includes a public transport function telling me when the next bus is supposed to be arriving at the closest bus stop (and it’s usually out by 1 or 2 minutes which isn’t bad).

I wonder if all these magical and wonderful properties that are attributed to hemp are not pushed and exaggerated by those who enjoy the psychoactive properties of some varieties.

And I wonder if the ignorance of certain forum members is due to their inability to read and understand simple Wikipedia articles.
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #440 on: December 07, 2019, 04:51:07 PM »
Right back at ya


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #441 on: December 07, 2019, 05:24:29 PM »
Right back at ya


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Yes, the CarbShark I’m used to.
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Offline Jeremy's Sea

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #442 on: December 07, 2019, 05:32:58 PM »
The thing is, I didn't say it would make no difference.  I said it would matter a whole lot.  A measly enough return for me not to bother.  I also didn't say nobody should make any changes. I've already made some changes, I'm just not willing to make that specific change at this time.  Others can make whatever changes suit them.

Of course you can do whatever you want to do.  You’re sufficiently anonymous that being ‘shamed’ here for continuing to eat meat has no consequences for you.  Although, if your profile is right and you live in Keavy, Kentucky you don’t have the cop out of claiming that the cattle in your area aren’t being grazed on land unsuitable for any other use.  Looking at Google Earth, Keavy looks to be in a very beautiful area with a lot of green (?pastures), forests, lakes and rivers.
The amount of corn we produce for the bourbon trade is pretty large.  Most of the cattle graze on pasture land that would be difficult to farm on.  The soil is fine, but the land is rolling at a fair pitch that would make planting and harvesting pretty hard.  I don't know if that's the same the further north or west you go where the land flattens out. I'm on the cusp of the cumberlands here.  Anyway, the land that they graze on now was fine for growing tobacco but not corn or beans.  Something about the way they are havested.  The tobacco trade is dying a slow death.  We are trying to bring hemp on.  They say it grows well here.


I hate the way we raise chickens here. It's the same as everywhere else and horrible.

Hemp seems to grow well everywhere:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

It seems to be a wonder crop, all of which can be used for many purposes.  It’s got a bad reputation because of the varieties that contain psychoactive drugs.  The growing of industrial hemp should be encouraged.

I regularly look at my house on Google Earth, but mainly to work out the best routes to get to places.  It also includes a public transport function telling me when the next bus is supposed to be arriving at the closest bus stop (and it’s usually out by 1 or 2 minutes which isn’t bad).

I wonder if all these magical and wonderful properties that are attributed to hemp are not pushed and exaggerated by those who enjoy the psychoactive properties of some varieties.
Regardless of whether or not stoners are enthusiastic about hemp, there is zero good reason to outlaw it, and there are many industrial sectors where it could be a huge benefit to the environment and costs to consumers. It is kind of irrelevant if stoners think it's magical or not. I'd be willing to bet the market would explode with hemp based products if prohibition laws were lifted on it.
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Online daniel1948

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #443 on: December 07, 2019, 05:38:49 PM »
Hemp was the fiber of choice for ropes before synthetics came along. It grows well under a wide variety of conditions and requires little or no fertilizer or pesticides, compared to cotton, which is softer and more absorbent but requires a lot of both. Hemp contains no psychoactive chemicals, or at any rate too little to have any effect.

Some folks oppose it because it looks so much like marijuana that untrained, uneducated police officers cannot distinguish it, so there's the possibility that a field of hemp could conceal a patch of marijuana. I have a belt and a set of handkerchiefs made of hemp. I got the belt because it can be hard to find a non-leather belt. I got the handkerchiefs just because they are good.

Cotton clothing is more comfortable than hemp but hemp is far lighter on the environment.

In Maui we don't use an awful lot of clothing.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline bachfiend

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #444 on: December 07, 2019, 06:30:51 PM »
Hemp was the fiber of choice for ropes before synthetics came along. It grows well under a wide variety of conditions and requires little or no fertilizer or pesticides, compared to cotton, which is softer and more absorbent but requires a lot of both. Hemp contains no psychoactive chemicals, or at any rate too little to have any effect.

Some folks oppose it because it looks so much like marijuana that untrained, uneducated police officers cannot distinguish it, so there's the possibility that a field of hemp could conceal a patch of marijuana. I have a belt and a set of handkerchiefs made of hemp. I got the belt because it can be hard to find a non-leather belt. I got the handkerchiefs just because they are good.

Cotton clothing is more comfortable than hemp but hemp is far lighter on the environment.

In Maui we don't use an awful lot of clothing.

Good point why it’s banned.  The obvious solution is to make marijuana legal.  Like Prohibition, the ‘War on Drugs’ has failed, and will continue to fail.  All it does to to enrich criminals.  Recreational drugs should be regulated and taxed just like legal drugs.
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Online daniel1948

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #445 on: Today at 09:24:29 AM »
Hemp was the fiber of choice for ropes before synthetics came along. It grows well under a wide variety of conditions and requires little or no fertilizer or pesticides, compared to cotton, which is softer and more absorbent but requires a lot of both. Hemp contains no psychoactive chemicals, or at any rate too little to have any effect.

Some folks oppose it because it looks so much like marijuana that untrained, uneducated police officers cannot distinguish it, so there's the possibility that a field of hemp could conceal a patch of marijuana. I have a belt and a set of handkerchiefs made of hemp. I got the belt because it can be hard to find a non-leather belt. I got the handkerchiefs just because they are good.

Cotton clothing is more comfortable than hemp but hemp is far lighter on the environment.

In Maui we don't use an awful lot of clothing.

Good point why it’s banned.  The obvious solution is to make marijuana legal.  Like Prohibition, the ‘War on Drugs’ has failed, and will continue to fail.  All it does to to enrich criminals.  Recreational drugs should be regulated and taxed just like legal drugs.

Then they'll say that hemp fields are concealing "bootleg" (untaxed) marijuana. Pot should be legalized, but that's really unconnected to hemp, which is more environmentally friendly than cotton, but would not be that big a market now that we're not rigging sailing ships with natural-fiber ropes. We rig our outrigger canoes with rope, but given a choice between hemp, which must be rubbed with tar to resist sea water, or synthetic rope, which is not treated with tar, I'll take the one without tar, thank you very much.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Online daniel1948

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Re: Beyond Burger 2.0
« Reply #446 on: Today at 10:20:02 AM »
I think I was mistaken above. I think this might be cotton rope. I guess it gets replaced before the sea water compromises its integrity. Hemp would probably be preferable in that case.

Pictures below are courtesy of Bruce Kurosaki. Part of our crew rigging the outrigger canoe for the Paddle for Life this year. We had to de-rig it for transport and then re-rig it at the beach. We might have re-rigged it anyway because a channel crossing is demanding on the canoe and you want to be sure the rigging is secure.




Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

 

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