Author Topic: Episode #502  (Read 10642 times)

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Offline Plastiq

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #75 on: February 25, 2015, 01:21:28 PM »
... most restaurants follow them in their menus and meal planning and food manufactures design their processed foods to be compatible with the guidelines ...

Even McDonalds and Burger King adhere to them.

I see you've lost the desire to even pretend to be credible.


Offline lonely moa

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #76 on: February 25, 2015, 01:34:25 PM »
... most restaurants follow them in their menus and meal planning and food manufactures design their processed foods to be compatible with the guidelines ...

Even McDonalds and Burger King adhere to them.

I see you've lost the desire to even pretend to be credible.

Really?  Even NZ parrots the deadly food pyramid.  The food tech teachers are forced to comply with pushing those recommendations, even though (at least one of them) understand they are wrong.  The PE teachers, though, have been talking bacon and eggs (and dissing toast and cereal) for breakfast for years.
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #77 on: February 25, 2015, 01:36:48 PM »
Here's a link to a good summary of the recommended changes to the dietary guidelines:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/19/nutrition-panel-calls-for-less-sugar-and-eases-cholesterol-and-fat-restrictions/?_r=0



Grat little article.  I see Ron Krauss stands by his data on the lack of evidence for any deleterious effect of saturated fat.

Good find.
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline mattokatamari

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #78 on: February 25, 2015, 04:16:33 PM »
I'm a circuit neurobiologist that works with mainly the opposing groups of "first order" feeding cells named for their released neuropeptides (NPY/AgRP and POMC). To be honest, the science in the feeding field itself actually has been a large part of the problem. How many silver bullet obesity cures have we been excited about once we learned about all the receptor targets present and how much mice would starve themselves in response to a blast of pharmacology? A ton. How many have panned out? 0. Leptin, melanocortin receptor agonists, opioid receptor antagonists, CB1 receptor inverse agonists. The one that actually worked to cause weight loss so far caused people to get depressed and kill themselves. Even though there's big bucks in a problem that affects over half of all Americans, drug companies are becoming wary of funding R&D because of all the failures.

Where does all this failure stem from? I have a good guess: we still don't understand the basic physiology of the feeding circuits. Labs are much more competitive in the feeding field than collaborative, and this leads to different camps creating their own set of dogma. Of course, every paper in a lab's sequence of publications will show evidence for their specific hypothesis (i.e. iffy, if not outright bad science). Big labs push questionable data through big journals like Nature Neuroscience or Science, blazing a trail of sexy findings, leaving all the details (like, critical flaw-type details) to be ironed out by medium-sized labs over years to come. Naturally, a lot of the details never get set straight, as many labs will start riding the coattails of this new revolutionary finding, managing to fit their data perfectly into a somewhat flawed theory and drowning out the minority of dissenters.

There are just too many disagreements for the amount of work everyone has done. It would be so incredibly helpful if the big players would start working toward a parsimonious explanation for the massive amount of data we've all collected. This field should be held to a higher standard. I wanted to post here to say that we in the energy homeostasis community ought to shoulder a lot more of the blame than what Steve seems willing to give. No, we aren't causing the obesity epidemic, but when the public looks to us for answers about the brain science of it all, we're just kind of sitting around with buckets of data not entirely sure of how it really fits into the story and how it can be applied to the human condition.

Offline Tamar Wilner

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Who's that noisy
« Reply #79 on: February 27, 2015, 01:38:03 AM »
Did anyone else's cat go crazy at the sound of this week's WTN?

-Tamar

Offline JenJDixon

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Re: Who's that noisy
« Reply #80 on: February 27, 2015, 09:45:05 AM »
Did anyone else's cat go crazy at the sound of this week's WTN?

-Tamar

Both of my puppies were perplexed by the WTN. Whenever I play it they immediately stop what they're doing and stare at the speakers. It's kind of adorable.

Offline Tamar Wilner

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #81 on: February 27, 2015, 10:47:52 PM »
Aw. What kind of puppies?

My cat started looking madly in every direction to locate the source of the sound (which I guess didn't sound like it was coming from my iPad). It was adorable but a little sad.

Offline JenJDixon

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #82 on: February 28, 2015, 12:55:02 AM »
Aw. What kind of puppies?

My cat started looking madly in every direction to locate the source of the sound (which I guess didn't sound like it was coming from my iPad). It was adorable but a little sad.

Two little bichon rescues.

« Last Edit: February 28, 2015, 12:58:56 AM by JenJDixon »

Offline AJ_Barbarito

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #83 on: February 28, 2015, 12:52:15 PM »

Offline RickK

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Re: Episode #502
« Reply #84 on: March 17, 2015, 06:37:09 PM »
Others have pointed this out, but the show notes for #502 SoF are broken - one choice is duplicated.
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away"  -- Phillp K. Dick