Author Topic: Terry Pratchett passed away  (Read 8710 times)

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Offline DK

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2015, 03:45:30 PM »
One book that hasn't been mentioned yet is 'Nation', technically a Young Adult book; but damn, if it doesn't really show his sceptical/atheist side. Highly recommend it.

Offline OhMyGecko

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #31 on: March 18, 2015, 07:51:52 AM »

I hadn't heard of this, thank you for posting. I really am sad to hear this but i hope he died on his own terms.

I started reading his novels in grade 6, truckers or diggers, but didn't enjoy them. Until i tried Pyramids (not a great book) which is probably the book which turned me into a reader.

The Rincewind novels are fun but i think the Vimes stories are better written. I suppose there might be only so much you can do with Rincewind.


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He didn't really get his voice until about book 4, then it just got better.

I found that the newer the book, the better it is. Probably not always true but it seemed accurate enough for me to describe the Discworld series.
I think some of it comes from maturing as a reader and better understanding his sense of humour.
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Offline superdave

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #32 on: March 18, 2015, 08:24:38 AM »
Gah, I gotta read me some Pratchett.  I've only ever seen a play based on one of his books.  The play was kinda meh.  But I know enough people with books to lend me.  I gotta get on top of that.
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #33 on: March 19, 2015, 02:50:20 AM »
Gah, I gotta read me some Pratchett.  I've only ever seen a play based on one of his books.  The play was kinda meh.  But I know enough people with books to lend me.  I gotta get on top of that.

You can carry an armful of Pratchetts out of a used bookstore for less than 10 bucks. I personally recommend starting with The Color of Magic, but I do agree that the later books tend to be better reads.... so you really can't go wrong.
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Offline brilligtove

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #34 on: March 19, 2015, 03:27:06 AM »
This started as "I'm sad" but became a comparative lit essay on the whole series.

Knowing the day would come too soon, I'm still saddened that Terry Pratchett is gone. His books brought me great joy over the decades, right to the end. The image below is a little out of date but a very useful guide to anyone interested in discovering the Discworld. Personally, I recommend beginning with Small Gods (it is pretty much standalone, like Pyramids) and then following the Witches, starting with Equal Rites.


(Image from: http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-20.jpg)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discworld#Novels
http://www.amazon.com/gp/bookseries/B00CJB9R84/ref=sr_bookseriesnull_B00CJB9R84

The Discworld Eras - BGO, AGO, PA

BGO: Before Good Omens

In 1983, The Colour Of Magic hit the shelves. It was spectacularly funny and bizarre. It was not so clear at the time that the physics of the Discworld were all based on one idea: What if the world really worked the way we think it works?

The first ten books in the series show a gradual fleshing out of the Discworld, but the stories do not have the rich tapestry that comes with the later books. Most of the big ideas and characters are born in this era, including Rincewind, Death, Granny Weatherwax, and Vimes.

1. The Colour of Magic, 1983
2 .The Light Fantastic, 1986
3. Equal Rites , 1987
4. Mort, 1987
5. Sourcery, 1988
6. Wyrd Sisters, 1988
7. Pyramids, 1989
8. Guards! Guards!, 1989
9. Eric, 1990
10. Moving Pictures, 1990

AGO: After Good Omens
In 1990 Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman collaborated on a book called Good Omens. It is my personal favorite book of all time. I'll be reading it yet again tonight while on a plane, and laughing hysterically, I'm sure. This collaboration was transformative for both authors. Gaiman's dark insights and cutting wit and Pratchett's lightness and wimsy infused into each other's writing. Small Gods is the most striking and obvious example on Pratchett's side, and may be the best Discworld novel. American Gods may be the same for Gaiman.

In the books that followed this, the Discworld was transformed from a faded backdrop to a vibrant character in it's own right. In part, this is why I recommend starting with Small Gods; the earlier books can be immensely better if you know the world better than the author did when he wrote them. (By the way, the inconsistencies and lost threads are dealt with in their own stories, especially Thief of Time - so don't worry about quirky continuity.)

In this era there are a variety of young adult books that are every bit as good as the adult books. The major difference is that the plotlines are less complex and the characters are younger. You'll enjoy reading about Tiffany, and not just because you get to see Granny Weatherwax again.

10. Moving Pictures, 1990
11. Reaper Man, 1991
12. Witches Abroad, 1991
13. Small Gods, 1992
14. Lords and Ladies, 1992
15. Men at Arms, 1993
16. Soul Music, 1994
17. Interesting Times, 1994
18. Maskerade, 1995
19. Feet of Clay, 1996
20. Hogfather, 1996
21. Jingo, 1997
22. The Last Continent, 1998
23. Carpe Jugulum, 1998
24. The Fifth Elephant, 1999
25. The Truth, 2000
26. Thief of Time, 2001
27. The Last Hero, 2001
28. The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, 2001
29. Night Watch, 2002
30.The Wee Free Men, 2003
31. Monstrous Regiment, 2003
32. A Hat Full of Sky, 2004

The only Discworld novel I didn't really enjoy is in this era: Jingo. I think I just never got the point - but it could also have been that it came out at a time when I wasn't able to appreciate it.

PA: Post Alzheimer's

Pratchett announced his early onset Alzheimer's in 2007, but I think his work was shifting before that. Still wonderful, of course, but not the same. Beloved characters - especially Commander Vimes - change as they age. Anhk-Morpork, the Discworld's greatest cesspit/city also matures and shifts. Some reviewers have said that the characters are "unrecognizable" compared to their earlier selves. To this I say, "Of course they are!" They're decades older, living in a world with breakneck technological development and radical inter-race and inter-culture integration. If they were same people as in their first appearances, they wouldn't be people.

Magic faded to the background over the AGO era, like electricity has faded to the background in our world. It's there, it can do amazing and terrible things, but it has also been tamed. Magic, in these last books, is almost exclusively based in the power of narrative - where the one in a million chance happens nine times out of ten. They are mature epics in a mature world with mature characters. Also, very very funny.

33. Going Postal, 2004
34. Thud!, 2005
35. Wintersmith, 2006
36. Making Money, 2007
37. Unseen Academicals, 2009
38. I Shall Wear Midnight, 2010
39. Snuff, 2011
40. Raising Steam, 2013

The Last Tale

41. The Shepherd's Crown, 2015

This hasn't been released yet. I suspect I'll have some tears of laughter and some tears of tears while I read it.

You are missed, Sir Pratchett.

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Online Harry Black

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #35 on: March 19, 2015, 07:56:14 AM »
Thief of Time was a weird experience for me.
The plot was right in my wheelhouse and I was learning obscure ways of punching people from a friendly enigma of a man at the time. I was reading it on the 3hr bus journey to one of my lessons one day and I BADLY needed the bathroom. So much so that I was sweating and rocking back and forth, wincing at every bump in the road. When we arrived I had to exit the bus behind two very slow old ladies and the same on the way to the bus station toilets. What followed was a real life enactment of the Austin Powers pee scene. Afterward life seemed so much better and with that experience and the philosophy of the story in my mind (or at least my understanding of it then) I went to the class and absolutely breezed it. Normally the workout made people puke and the pain of the session was pretty bad but with the way my head was after the morning I had just had, I was euphoric and the usual pressure points and holds didnt bother me in the slightest.
Its still something I think of (the story, not the pee) whenever Im putting my body through something it really doesnt want to do. And it does kind of help and at least makes me smile.
I think a reread is in order.

Offline Sordid

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #36 on: March 19, 2015, 09:19:32 AM »
Edit: Nevermind.

Offline Grimner

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #37 on: March 24, 2015, 07:45:19 AM »
Happily I have managed to avoid Terry Pratchett (gaudy looking books, yes, I am shallow), but after just reading 'The Colour of Magic', I can see more Discworld in my future. And you are saying it gets better? Nice. Poor Death.
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #38 on: March 24, 2015, 05:50:12 PM »
And you are saying it gets better?

Oh my, yes.

There was something special about being exposed to that world for the first time, but the writing itself does get even better.
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Offline Johnny Slick

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #39 on: March 25, 2015, 03:01:15 PM »
I would say the first couple of books are enjoyable if you've played some Dungeons and Dragons and want a funny parody of that. The later books don't require that angle to be fun, and IMO they're better overall reads as well.
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Offline Tatyana

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #40 on: March 25, 2015, 06:14:34 PM »
Way, way better.

I really started loving Pratchett at Equal Rites.

Lately my night time fall asleep books are 'The Science of Discworld II: Darwin's watch' and 'Mrs. Bradshaw's Handbook' which is a guide to the new trains on Discworld (see Raising Steam).


Offline Belgarath

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #41 on: March 25, 2015, 09:25:10 PM »
Actually thanks Johnny.  I've been looking for a way to describe his early books compared to his later books and this does it quite nicely. 
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Offline Doctor Whom

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #42 on: March 26, 2015, 08:23:49 PM »
Way, way better.

I really started loving Pratchett at Equal Rites.

Lately my night time fall asleep books are 'The Science of Discworld II: Darwin's watch' and 'Mrs. Bradshaw's Handbook' which is a guide to the new trains on Discworld (see Raising Steam).

I tell Pratchett newbies to start with Equal Rites. TCoM is something of a curate's egg stylistically, and I think Equal Rites introduces the wizarding world and Ankh-Morpork better, as Esk is a newcomer to the city and acts as an audience avatar, with Granny W alongside for when things need deeper explanations.
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Offline Drunken Idaho

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #43 on: March 27, 2015, 02:06:48 AM »
Way, way better.

I really started loving Pratchett at Equal Rites.

Lately my night time fall asleep books are 'The Science of Discworld II: Darwin's watch' and 'Mrs. Bradshaw's Handbook' which is a guide to the new trains on Discworld (see Raising Steam).

I tell Pratchett newbies to start with Equal Rites. TCoM is something of a curate's egg stylistically, and I think Equal Rites introduces the wizarding world and Ankh-Morpork better, as Esk is a newcomer to the city and acts as an audience avatar, with Granny W alongside for when things need deeper explanations.

That's a great thought. I might start doing that.
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Offline Rabbit

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Re: Terry Pratchett passed away
« Reply #44 on: April 03, 2015, 04:18:50 AM »
Well, I'm powering through them again.

Man, he was good! :(