Author Topic: any manly man mancave skeptics?  (Read 9649 times)

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Offline GodSlayer

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any manly man mancave skeptics?
« on: April 04, 2015, 01:36:18 AM »
now that I'm off work injured I've finally gotten into a couple middle-school level building projects (shelves, and push-up bars of various styles)

lost my power tool virginity (never really done anything outside of high school). got a good sense of the circular saw, now. and just bought a little belt sander, today. it's nifty. bought some varnish, too. think I might need to invest in a better range of sandpapers.

trying to learn to be patient, instead of just banging things together ASAP. waiting for varnish to dry... making sure I get the right shape, get it sanded enough, etc.

starting to think about building a dip bar stand or something, too, though I'm thoughly oblivious to things like wood strengths (I don't even know the name of the kind of strength I'm thinking about (if a piece of board is easy to karate chop through, what kind of strength does it lack? (e.g., compressive, tensile)

anyone here with the knowledge of these sorts of things?
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Offline Harry Black

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2015, 03:32:09 AM »
I believe the answer is "karate strength"
Im right. Dont bother checking.
But yeah, Im no help, I just dont have the patience or attention to detail for stuff like that unfortunately. Ive been surrounded by handymen my whole life and have been roped into their projects constantly and I have never learned anything from any of it. It seems like my brain actively hates that type of information.

Offline Caffiene

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2015, 04:00:13 AM »
I don't even know the name of the kind of strength I'm thinking about (if a piece of board is easy to karate chop through, what kind of strength does it lack? (e.g., compressive, tensile)

Depends exactly why it breaks, but it would either but lacking tensile strength (ie, it is weak when being stretched, and the bend from being hit causes stretching on the side of the wood thats away from the strike) or lacking shear strength (two halves shear past each other). Most likely tensile weakness.

Most timber that you find in a hardware store thats intended for "serious" building should have a grading. Easiest bet is to just ask at the hardware store and mention what youre building and theyll point you towards something appropriate. The most common housing graded timber should be strong enough for most amateur uses plus be probably the cheapest. Apart from that they may have a letter or number that designates a certain type of treatment thatll mean theyre for indoor or outdoor use (ie, outdoor timber needs to be treated so that it doesnt rot, or be a tough (probably expensive) hardwood)
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Offline GodSlayer

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2015, 02:34:16 AM »
'Flexural strength'. does that sound right?

The most common housing graded timber should be strong enough for most amateur uses plus be probably the cheapest.

yea, but in what configuration (obviously if I cut it 2mm thin it's no longer strong for most uses)

does this look at all right?
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/wood-beams-strength-d_1480.html
(it doesn't say how think a 'beam' is, though)

trying to figure out how much wood it's safe to cut away while still having enough strength left.
Quote from: Thomas Carlyle
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Offline Pusher Robot

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2015, 09:47:15 PM »
'Flexural strength'. does that sound right?

The most common housing graded timber should be strong enough for most amateur uses plus be probably the cheapest.

yea, but in what configuration (obviously if I cut it 2mm thin it's no longer strong for most uses)

does this look at all right?
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/wood-beams-strength-d_1480.html
(it doesn't say how think a 'beam' is, though)

trying to figure out how much wood it's safe to cut away while still having enough strength left.

If by "dip bar stand" you mean the exercise equipment it is going to depend a lot on your design.  Fastener strength will often end up as much or more.  Generally speaking, a couple of construction 2x4 pieces of pine should easily be able to tolerate thousands of pounds of transient stresses.  A couple of 1x2 braces at the bottom should prevent undue angular stress at the joint.  The handholds are a little trickier; they will also probably have to be braced to the upright, but so long as they aren't too long you could probably use a couple of short hardwood dowels through holes in the uprights.
A novice was trying to fix a broken Lisp machine by turning the power off and on.
Knight, seeing what the student was doing, spoke sternly: “You cannot fix a machine by just power-cycling it with no understanding of what is going wrong.”
Knight turned the machine off and on.
The machine worked.

Offline GodSlayer

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2015, 05:44:57 AM »
If by "dip bar stand" you mean the exercise equipment it is going to depend a lot on your design.  Fastener strength will often end up as much or more.  Generally speaking, a couple of construction 2x4 pieces of pine should easily be able to tolerate thousands of pounds of transient stresses.  A couple of 1x2 braces at the bottom should prevent undue angular stress at the joint.  The handholds are a little trickier; they will also probably have to be braced to the upright, but so long as they aren't too long you could probably use a couple of short hardwood dowels through holes in the uprights.
braces like those used when people toenail a frame? or some other kind? ('cause obviously I wouldn't need to toenail, but maybe I should?)

yea, or, I figure it's even conceivable to whack a 2x4 onto the uprights and sand it into a dowelish grip (in the Olympics the P-bars they use have an oval shape of 1.6x2)
would that be stronger than just a dowel itself for the whole length (whatever that length ends up being)?
otherwise metal might be the way to go. dunno what that costs, though.
Quote from: Thomas Carlyle
In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.

Offline GodSlayer

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2015, 01:27:10 PM »
a little doodly art, because I couldn't be bothered trying my hand at carving again without proper chisels. (apparently I can be bothered drawing even if I can't get my hands on a nice fine-tip pen)

big one was just a split bit of wood not good for anything, so I traced my favorite little band logo (a phoenix) on it, curious how it would look.

little one one is just meant to be one of four stands for exercise bars...decoration not terribly important,  but I kinda like it as a little decoration, will probably make another one with a little more eye for detail.



« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 01:33:19 PM by GodSlayer »
Quote from: Thomas Carlyle
In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.

Offline GodSlayer

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2015, 08:21:54 PM »
::shakes fist::

my brand new paint brush is solid as a rock (thanks varnish!) :( need to go buy some turps or something.

doodling continues for my mjolnir bar project. been re-familiarizing myself with old pagan memes for it


« Last Edit: May 16, 2015, 08:24:07 PM by GodSlayer »
Quote from: Thomas Carlyle
In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.

Offline Beleth

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2015, 09:58:04 PM »
GS, I'm sorry you got injured badly enough to be off work, but I have to admit I really like seeing this creative side of you.
I expect to pass through this world but once;
any good thing therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now;
let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.
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Offline GodSlayer

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2015, 12:11:00 AM »
GS, I'm sorry you got injured badly enough to be off work, but I have to admit I really like seeing this creative side of you.

heh, yea. it's nice being able to do things that time pressures usually keep me from.

back at work on Monday. ::sigh::

colored in that one above


and finished/started the design for the other side, nature'y theme centered around Yggdrasil (the world tree) ...frustratingly it's off centre, and was kinda the wrong size. but these are all nice lessons for me, lol


also scored some free wood and put up a shelf in the garage.
still working on another two bigger ones in more of a shelving unit design so that it's moveable instead of fixed ...also fraught with design miscalculations!
« Last Edit: May 23, 2015, 12:16:44 AM by GodSlayer »
Quote from: Thomas Carlyle
In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.

Offline TimberGeek

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2015, 12:38:24 AM »
I know a little about wood...


And structural properties there of...


  The values in the table you linked to in your initial post are what would get plugged into a number of different equations.  Beyond comparing different species they're pretty much useless on their own without a drawing to determine which equation is appropriate.
  For something like your dip stand I'd go with the simpler method of laying the stick on a pair of blocks at the desired distance apart and standing on it.  If it breaks you need a stronger species, shorter span or large cross section.   ;D

Offline GodSlayer

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2015, 01:34:39 AM »


there are about 5 pieces of wood in that picture that have me very confused and curious

...is that temporary? like, until some pyramid capping beam goes along the length of that roof?
Quote from: Thomas Carlyle
In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.

Offline TimberGeek

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2015, 03:42:37 AM »
Yeah, that was just temporary bracing until the roof sheathing and end wall panels went on.  Here's a shot from later on in the process.



Most of the frame is wrapped in stress skin panels (SSPs*) and the attic roof is 1x6 T&G pine which I installed from inside the attic except the very last board.

The two story portion of the frame is cut almost verbatim from "Build a Classic Timber-Framed House" by Jack A. Sobon.
I pitched up the upper roof to solar optimum for my latitude and designed the additions.

*SSPs are an 8 foot wide sandwich of OSB outside, 3.5" of rigid foam insulation then sheet rock (or OSB) inside.  This gives me a continuous envelope of insulation with no studs to conduct heat to the outside and an exposed frame inside.

Offline GodSlayer

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2015, 04:57:03 PM »
Most of the frame is wrapped in stress skin panels (SSPs*) and the attic roof is 1x6 T&G pine which I installed from inside the attic except the very last board.

with attics, d'you guys put in insulation and the floor the attic, or insulate the roof, or what? ('cause in NZ homes we don't have attics, just an unused ceiling space, so the insulation just goes in all the gaps and there's nowhere to walk/store things except on the beams)

how long've you been a builder? how'd you get into it?
Quote from: Thomas Carlyle
In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.

Offline brilligtove

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Re: any manly man mancave skeptics?
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2015, 05:36:00 PM »
My ancient garage has been disintegrating for many decades, with dozens of rickety slapdash shoring-up repairs over that time. This year I decided it was time to make it strong enough to not worry about it any more. The big motivation was that the roof was a disaster and unrepairable, because the whole structure couldn't take the weight of people working on it, let alone the new materials for a new roof.

I got started, and then I got sick. I paid a contractor to do some structural reinforcements - I'm not so skilled with concrete - which gave us enough stability to start reinforcing the rest of the the building. Last weekend, my neighbours - who have been amazing during my treatment - came over and finished the roof. There's still a bunch of fiddly bits to do, but essentially we have a solid structure that will take whatever the weather throws at it, and for a long time to come.

Also, I have some leftover materials that I can use to build other projects that I haven't gotten to, and will be able to make the garage into an actual workshop for the building. I'm looking forward to getting all that done in the spring.
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