Author Topic: Favorite Stephen King book?  (Read 4120 times)

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Offline Anders

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Favorite Stephen King book?
« on: June 08, 2015, 08:43:01 AM »
Assuming you like Stephen King, what is your favorite book? (If you don't like Stephen King, feel free to start a thread about that)

I must say my favorite is Pet Semetary. No other book freaks me out as much as that one. Death and the dead have always held a special place in my pantheon of nightmares, and it's an excellent study of a man descending into madness.
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Offline starnado

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2015, 09:17:27 AM »
I really enjoyed The Stand.

However, my favourite works of his are those in The Dark Tower sequence. Nothing he has written has held my attention and kept me wanting more like that did. Admittedly, that may have been in part due to the long wait between the books being released.

I have started and not finished a few of his, including Cujo and Lisey's Story (which he rates as the best novel he has ever written, but it failed to hold my attention at all).  Cujo - well, I was twelve when I started it so I may just have been too young.

I read Dreamcatcher on holiday. It was OK, I suppose. The film was atrocious. Wikipedia has this to say:

Quote
In 2014, King told Rolling Stone that "I don't like Dreamcatcher very much," and stated that the book was written under the influence of Oxycontin.[2]
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Offline gcason

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2015, 10:01:59 AM »
'Salem's Lot

You never forget your first.  :)
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Offline PANTS!

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2015, 10:37:05 AM »
Assuming you like Stephen King, what is your favorite book? (If you don't like Stephen King, feel free to start a thread about that)

I must say my favorite is Pet Semetary. No other book freaks me out as much as that one. Death and the dead have always held a special place in my pantheon of nightmares, and it's an excellent study of a man descending into madness.

Pet Semetary scared the teetotal fuck out of me, and now that I have kids, I still get freaked out by that book because of how Gage died.

But my fave book by him is hands down - The Stand.  This is where my love of epic fantasy came from.  Not from Tolkien.

Beyond that, any of his pre '90s books I will often read again.  Past that, I just can't get into his stuff as much anymore.
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Offline superdave

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2015, 11:09:25 AM »
Wizard and Glass.

If I was making a Dark Tower movie,  I'd do it in chronological order.  First movie would be the story of Roland and his Gunslinger test, next movie is Wizard and Glass.
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Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2015, 11:58:04 AM »
The Stand.  I'm not a huge fan of horror so I generally like his more fantasy stuff better.

Offline random poet

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2015, 02:47:37 PM »
Count me as another vote for The Stand. The Christian allegory is a little ham-fisted, but it's his most ambitious work in terms of scope, and sometimes the simple metaphors are the best, because the reader will be on board from the start. And I guess I just prefer post-apocalyptic fiction to horror.

I also read most of his horror stuff in my teens, and I was into it at the time, but I find it facile and maladroit now. I think Misery is the one I liked the best at the time, probably because I identified with the Mary-Sue protagonist, but I don't think it would stand up now if I were to re-read it. I guess I liked Firestarter as well, and there was some pretty grim dystopic anti-government stuff in there. I remember liking some of his old Richard Bachman novellas; The Long Walk in particular was rather striking (it's another dystopia, so I guess it's not surprising that I liked it better than the rest).
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Offline amysrevenge

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2015, 12:23:36 PM »
I really enjoyed Dark Tower.  I haven't read much of his other stuff, but am culturally aware enough (and willing enough to google/wiki spoilers) that I was able to enjoy the implicit and explicit links to his wider bibliography in Dark Tower.  Knowing that the Salem's Lot dude was in there without having read Salem's Lot was still really cool, for instance.
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Online RumbleFishTwist

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2015, 07:32:12 PM »
I think I might have to agree about "Wizard and Glass".
I read the Bachman stuff when I was young and have re-read (listened actually) recently.
I think "Roadwork" and "Running Man" are pretty hilarious.
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Offline Kosh62

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2015, 04:38:09 PM »
'Salem's Lot

You never forget your first.  :)

What he said. Back in the summer of 1979 when I was a teenager, I decided to give King a try based on positive reviews of his work from Harlan Ellison, a writer who I greatly admire. My policy when starting with  a new author is to always try a collection of his short fiction first, so I went out and bought a paperback of Night Shift. Halfway through the stories in that collection, I went out again and bought out King's entire catalog at that time...a  whopping six books.  Salem's Lot was the first one I read. I  re-read it every Halloween for years.  And outside of King, I'm not really a huge horror fan. 

Offline EgeneBlankenship

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2015, 06:44:58 PM »
I love his novellas and short stories (Apt Pupil, The Body (which was made into the movie Stand By Me), The Green Mile, Shawshank Redemption).  And his short stories are just great. I love them.

Offline gcason

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2015, 10:25:15 PM »
'Salem's Lot

You never forget your first.  :)

What he said. Back in the summer of 1979 when I was a teenager, I decided to give King a try based on positive reviews of his work from Harlan Ellison, a writer who I greatly admire. My policy when starting with  a new author is to always try a collection of his short fiction first, so I went out and bought a paperback of Night Shift. Halfway through the stories in that collection, I went out again and bought out King's entire catalog at that time...a  whopping six books.  Salem's Lot was the first one I read. I  re-read it every Halloween for years.  And outside of King, I'm not really a huge horror fan.

My father worked a 4 pm to Midnight shift in the 70s, so I was usually asleep when he got home. To wind down after work, he'd read for a while before bed. One night, I came out from my bedroom to get a drink of water or something at about 1 am. He was quietly reading 'Salem's Lot and hadn't heard me. He almost flipped out of his chair when I greeted him. I decided that I had to read the book as soon as he was done.  ;D
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Offline Grimner

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2015, 05:27:58 PM »
The Long Walk
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I do not thing King is all that scary, but he is very good at creeping unease and creating people you start caring about.
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Offline EvilNick

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #13 on: August 27, 2015, 09:21:28 AM »
Since this was favorite Stephen King book, I'm going to say Night Shift, the collection of short stories.  I loved those when I was a teenager.  It has the original Lawnmower Man and Battleground in it.  Fun stuff.

Full-length novel, I've only read a few, but probably Christine.
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Offline Johnny Slick

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Re: Favorite Stephen King book?
« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2015, 01:14:16 PM »
Bag of Bones, I guess? TBH King is a guy who I find myself being very frustrated with. He's clearly a talented writer, and that talent consistently shows through on a scene-to-scene basis, but the man desperately needs either an editor or else to listen to his editor because on a chapter-by-chapter basis the writing gets very, very lazy. He'll clearly fall in love with some scene that really has nothing to do with the overall plot of the book and just carry on with it for a hundred or more pages. Or else he'll get to a point to where he doesn't quite know how things are supposed to end and so he kind of tacks something on. His older books are better with this in part, I think, because he did listen to his editors back then.
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