Author Topic: Episode #590  (Read 3740 times)

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Offline PANTS!

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2016, 01:52:06 PM »
I didn't know Halloween in the UK was big enough for 50% of households to opt-out of it.

I've heard this a lot, I guess its not popular in England but it was always big in Glasgow and it's huge these days, especially with adults like was mentioned on the podcast.

Also we had to say a joke, sing a song, perform a trick or similar before getting sweets, which fits with the celtic roots. I'm 31 so it was a while back and it's a bit more 'trick or treat' American style now I guess. We would say, 'the sky is blue, the grass is green, have you anything for my Halloween? ' then do whatever trick, you normally get invited in the house too.

I know my mum still loves getting kids round and she makes them do a performance of some kind still :)

It was huge in our neighborhood a suburb of Edinburgh.  But this was back in the 70s, and may have been influenced by small but significant population of expat Americans there.
Now where I come from
We don't let society tell us how it's supposed to be
-Uptown, Prince 👉

We cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered.

Offline MikeHz

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #16 on: October 30, 2016, 01:56:41 PM »
Good show, as always. SGU is the first podcast I listen to when it hits the internet.

Incidentally, the thing about parents having their kid's candy haul x-rayed is entirely true. Back in the Eighties, we did it for a couple Halloweens. All the area hospitals offered to x-ray candy for the holiday. Remember that this was before the internet and when the media loved spreading scary stories about pins and razors in candy and apples. Just a moment's though shows how foolish the idea was. WE knew what homes our kids had visited. Anyone tampering with candy would have met with a mop of angry parents!
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them they have been fooled." Mark Twain

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2016, 06:11:05 PM »
The newest entry in my top ten favorite ways to die is death by candy corn. About 4 pounds should do it according to what they said. Actually, I forgot the exact number they said so I looked on Wikipedia, where it says 29.7 g/kg. I weigh about 63 1/2 kg. so a tad over 4 pounds should do it if I'm at the mid-point. It wouldn't be easy, though. I start getting sick after half a pound of chocolate, and I can't get much past a pound.

I love candy corn. Pure sugar with a bit of food coloring and wax. It's one of only very few non-chocolate sweets I'll eat, not counting fruit, which is my main sweet. Apple pie, pecan pie, licorice, candy corn. I'm not even slightly tempted by most non-chocolate sweets.
Daniel
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2016, 06:26:16 PM »
I gotta admit that the idea of dark energy is so weird that I would not mind all that much if it turned out to not exist. I mean, it's supposed to make the universe expand at an accelerating rate, and if I understand correctly, it's supposed to remain constant per unit volume of space, so that it increases as the universe expands. Doesn't that violate the conservation of energy? And the idea that the universe could expand at an ever-accelerating rate forever just seems like bad form. I will look forward to further information, though my chances of being around in 15 years are not great.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline Sawyer

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2016, 10:29:23 PM »
Its nice that you can get a decent quote out of Terry Goodking, but be careful.  The truth he speaks of is "The Truth" with a capital "T".  Specifically Goodkind's TRUTH is that of Randian Objectivism.  But rereading that quote with the idea that the speaker is not speaking of empirical scientific truth, but of philosophical nigh religious Truths makes that quote much more creepy, IMO. 

The quote goes on:

Quote
That leaves peaceful people no choice but to fight for their lives or fall to the blades of madmen. In such a situation, there is no middle ground. There is no such thing as compromise between civilization and savagery. Civilization must always defend itself against savagery or else fall to it.

Finished the podcast and thought "I bet Pants will have something to say about this quote"   :D

Offline PANTS!

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #20 on: October 30, 2016, 11:22:18 PM »
Heh.  Yuppers.  I didn't even mention the giant chicken what was evil.
Now where I come from
We don't let society tell us how it's supposed to be
-Uptown, Prince 👉

We cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered.

Offline AtheistApotheosis

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #21 on: October 31, 2016, 04:46:55 AM »
Good show, as always. SGU is the first podcast I listen to when it hits the internet.

Incidentally, the thing about parents having their kid's candy haul x-rayed is entirely true. Back in the Eighties, we did it for a couple Halloweens. All the area hospitals offered to x-ray candy for the holiday. Remember that this was before the internet and when the media loved spreading scary stories about pins and razors in candy and apples. Just a moment's though shows how foolish the idea was. WE knew what homes our kids had visited. Anyone tampering with candy would have met with a mop of angry parents!
A mop of angry parents. I'm sure that's a collective noun for parents who were raised in the sixties.  :D I love spell check errors.

Offline stlc8tr

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2016, 06:52:09 PM »
"coup de grĂ¢ce"

I don't think Steven pronounced it correctly either since he stretched it out.

From what I understand, you don't really pronounce the "de" so it's more like "cood grahs".

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/coup_de_gr%C3%A2ce

(There's an audio clip at the bottom of the entry.)

Online Harry Black

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #23 on: October 31, 2016, 07:03:03 PM »
Cara's impression of trick or treat made me smile.
The kids arent asking for one or the other, they are saying "Give us a treat or we will play a trick on you!" Pretty much extortion.
I was always told its because the fairie folk would cross the veil on that night and if you didnt leave out treats for them they would trick you. So if children were playing the part of beings from the other side, they had to do the same.

It was also beneficial to have kids dressed as ghosts around the town and around your house, because the idea was that ghosts would see them and assume this place was haunted enough and move on.
Maybe like a ghost union kind of thing?
Anyway, it meant that the kids trick or treating were actually saving the whole town and had earned their sweets.

Or so my grandad told me. I wasnt quite savvy enough to demand sources at the time.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #24 on: October 31, 2016, 07:58:07 PM »
In Mexico the kids say "Queremos Halloween." Literally, "We want Halloween." No mention of tricks. I had been unaware that Halloween was a thing in Mexico so I didn't have any candy on hand. I gave the kids each 5 pesos instead (worth about 50 cents US at the time) and people actually got mad at me: I was supposed to give candy, not money. I reasoned that the kids could buy candy with the 5 pesos instead, and could actually buy more candy with 5 pesos than they got at a typical house. But the adults didn't like it. Since I didn't eat candy at all at the time, and didn't know there would be trick-or-treaters, it was either give them a few pesos or send them away empty-handed, which seemed bad form.

The next night there were a few more, but I sent them away telling then Halloween was last night. Maybe they just didn't get the significance of the date and figured they'd try their luck the following night. They do have the day of the dead on our Halloween, but apparently trick-or-treating was imported from the U.S.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline Astronomianova

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #25 on: November 01, 2016, 08:33:11 AM »
Dark Energy:  Its likelihood and an error.

It is very unlikely that dark energy is going away.  There are many more measurements that suggest necessity for dark energy than supernova data.  SN data was just the first.  The most notable and accurate measurements of dark energy come from CMB studies (WMAP, Boomerang, ACBAR, Planck...) which give the often cited number that roughly 70% of our universe is dark energy.  There are also surveys of the distribution of galaxies which can be used to measure dark energy.  All of these studies and data have to be taken together and they give robust support to the idea of an accelerating universe which requires dark energy.

Error:  It was said in the show that if we take seriously the possibility--included in the spread of data given in this new paper--that the universe is expanding at a constant rate that we do not need dark energy.  This is not true.  We know there is matter in the universe.  This should slow expansion.  For the universe the expand at a constant rate would still require dark energy of some form to counter the attraction of the matter present.

I doubt dark energy is going anywhere.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #26 on: November 01, 2016, 08:47:00 AM »
I think we're all eagerly awaiting more information.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline Astronomianova

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #27 on: November 01, 2016, 09:40:56 AM »
I gotta admit that the idea of dark energy is so weird that I would not mind all that much if it turned out to not exist. I mean, it's supposed to make the universe expand at an accelerating rate, and if I understand correctly, it's supposed to remain constant per unit volume of space, so that it increases as the universe expands. Doesn't that violate the conservation of energy? And the idea that the universe could expand at an ever-accelerating rate forever just seems like bad form. I will look forward to further information, though my chances of being around in 15 years are not great.

Conservation of energy only applies locally in General Relativity and it does not hold in an expanding universe.  This sometimes upsetting fact is true if you have dark energy or not.

Now one can rewrite the form of the equations in GR to include a term for gravitational energy (it is not there otherwise).  The gravitational energy turns out to be negative in this formulation.  This saves conservation of energy because as you add dark energy as space expands you also produce equal amounts of negative gravitational energy so the total is zero.

Finally, dark energy would still be required in a constant acceleration universe but it would be even more complicated.  It would have to decay at just the right rate to fight the attraction of matter as the universe expands and this would not be explained as readily as a cosmological constant which is allowed by GR.

Offline postwaste

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2016, 10:35:56 AM »
Regarding exceptions to lying. Dr. Novella used the example of lying to protect Jews from the Nazis. He said no one would object to that. Unfortunately, there are. I was taught in the church I grew up in that lying is ALWAYS wrong, even to save a life. The example of the Nazis was used. Pretty messed up, I know.

Offline MikeHz

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Re: Episode #590
« Reply #29 on: November 01, 2016, 10:41:24 AM »
Regarding exceptions to lying. Dr. Novella used the example of lying to protect Jews from the Nazis. He said no one would object to that. Unfortunately, there are. I was taught in the church I grew up in that lying is ALWAYS wrong, even to save a life. The example of the Nazis was used. Pretty messed up, I know.

Well, no moral person would do so.
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them they have been fooled." Mark Twain

 

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