Author Topic: Going Solar  (Read 3950 times)

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Offline Billzbub

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Re: Going Solar
« Reply #75 on: November 29, 2018, 03:56:39 PM »
Thanks guys for the discussion.  I agree with you and told the saleswoman that I'd have to wait a few years.

After crunching the numbers, I pay an average of $97 per month in electricity alone.  The 29 solar panels she quoted me were based on my electricity usage over the last 2 years and are meant to give me just enough KWh credits to cover that usage 100%.  If the panels generate more, then I start building a bank of KWh credits that I can't change into money or into credit for the gas portion of my bill (which is actually significant after all).

At this point, I'm definitely not taking out a 12 year loan with $137 monthly payments just to take $97 off my power bill just so I don't have to pay for electricity starting in 12 years.  The sales lady was telling me to look at it over 20 years and it would make sense, but I need that money now for my kids in college.  I will look at it again in 3 years or so.  Maybe the prices of solar panels will come down and the price of electricity will go up so that it makes better sense.
Quote from: Steven Novella
gleefully altering one’s beliefs to accommodate new information should be a badge of honor

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Going Solar
« Reply #76 on: November 29, 2018, 10:43:25 PM »
I think that is a wise choice.

I'm still amazed at how much more expensive a solar PV system is over there though.

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Going Solar
« Reply #77 on: December 04, 2018, 10:23:49 PM »
So while the system I installed has been going for nearly 6 weeks, the "official" start date is somewhat later as that begins when the energy retailer upgraded the meter box with smart meters (for main circuits and also one for the off-peak hot water circuit).

So in the first 15 days since then my electricity costs have dropped from $13.58/day to $2.97/day.

Keep in mind $1.73 of that is a flat daily fee for being connected to the grid.

Offline Billzbub

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Re: Going Solar
« Reply #78 on: December 05, 2018, 03:37:03 PM »
If you had one more solar panel, would you be selling back enough electricity to have a zero bill, or would that fee still be charged to you and you'd just be building credits for a rainy day?
Quote from: Steven Novella
gleefully altering one’s beliefs to accommodate new information should be a badge of honor

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Going Solar
« Reply #79 on: December 05, 2018, 11:38:13 PM »
If you had one more solar panel, would you be selling back enough electricity to have a zero bill, or would that fee still be charged to you and you'd just be building credits for a rainy day?

Well I can go bigger but my export power output is limited to 9kW, so once my system starts putting out 9kW more than I am using, it automatically caps the export. I have 11kW of panels with a 10kW inverter. At present it's rare to have export capped as during peak production times I'll have pool pump going + other house stuff.

Occasionally I do hit the limit of my inverter 10kW.

It's typical to oversize panels by 133% of the inverter size but spending another $1.5 - $2k to have another 8 panels seemed overkill.

It's also a function of roof space and azimuth alignment of panels - you need to be careful how the panels strings are set up. I already have 40 panels on the roof.

 

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