Author Topic: Religion.jpg  (Read 42755 times)

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Online Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #390 on: April 27, 2019, 05:39:00 PM »
Confirmation usually happens in the third grade, about age 8.

That's the age at which a person becomes an adult in the "eyes of the Church."
So, everything's "consensual" from then on?  >:(
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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #391 on: April 27, 2019, 06:35:25 PM »
Confirmation usually happens in the third grade, about age 8.

That's the age at which a person becomes an adult in the "eyes of the Church."

Is that specific to Catholicism?

Over here, the age for confirmation (Church of Sweden, not Catholic) is typically around 14 or 15.

I am happy to report that over the past decade or so, confirmations have been in strong decline, meaning youths choose not to be confirmed.
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Offline John Albert

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #392 on: April 28, 2019, 06:12:37 PM »
Is that specific to Catholicism?

That's how I intended it, yes.

I don't know how other churches handle confirmation.

Online The Latinist

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #393 on: April 28, 2019, 09:23:13 PM »
A little research suggests to me that the average age at confirmation in the Catholic Church is 14, which agrees with my memory of when my Catholic friends were confirmed. I am certain, for instance, that my best friend in high school was in 9th grade when he was confirmed.
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Offline John Albert

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #394 on: April 29, 2019, 01:49:19 AM »
A little research suggests to me that the average age at confirmation in the Catholic Church is 14, which agrees with my memory of when my Catholic friends were confirmed. I am certain, for instance, that my best friend in high school was in 9th grade when he was confirmed.

I was confirmed in the 6th grade. The article I posted says there's no universal standard and suggests that nowadays many diocese are confirming kids at a much younger age.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #395 on: April 29, 2019, 04:52:28 AM »

Online 2397

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #396 on: April 29, 2019, 05:06:38 AM »
In Norway, confirmation was originally something that everyone had to go through to finish their education, or be punished, when Norway was a Danish theocracy. And only became voluntary in 1912.

At some point it became standardized to the year you turn 15, in the spring. Currently 15 is the minimum age that you can choose your own religious membership, a.k.a. the age of majority for religion. The confirmation process starts in the year before the year you turn 15. Meaning that you're not really considered able to make your own choice until it's too late to make it.

I'd change that to 18 and also make 18 the minimum age for membership. As of now, the vast majority of members in the former state church became members at age 0, and remain members because they haven't taken any decisions about their membership after they gained the right to.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #397 on: April 29, 2019, 05:37:54 AM »

Online 2397

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #398 on: April 29, 2019, 07:15:10 AM »
While others pressure poor and sick congregants into giving everything they possibly can to the church, just so that God can carry out the plan he was going to carry out anyway.

Online Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #399 on: April 29, 2019, 07:33:20 AM »
IIRC the Vatican has SEVEN art galleries.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Online The Latinist

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #400 on: April 29, 2019, 10:22:26 AM »
A little research suggests to me that the average age at confirmation in the Catholic Church is 14, which agrees with my memory of when my Catholic friends were confirmed. I am certain, for instance, that my best friend in high school was in 9th grade when he was confirmed.

I was confirmed in the 6th grade. The article I posted says there's no universal standard and suggests that nowadays many diocese are confirming kids at a much younger age.

The article you posted suggests that a few diocese have moved the age earlier, while the majority still confirm in middle or high school.  I don’t think the facts justify your claim that confirmation “usually happens in the third grade, about age 8.”
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline gebobs

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #401 on: April 29, 2019, 11:16:11 AM »
I was confirmed in 9th grade. I lost my faith within a few years.

Offline Awatsjr

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #402 on: April 30, 2019, 02:28:32 AM »
I dodged and parried until I was clear of them.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #403 on: May 01, 2019, 05:28:35 AM »
The article you posted suggests that a few diocese have moved the age earlier, while the majority still confirm in middle or high school.  I don’t think the facts justify your claim that confirmation “usually happens in the third grade, about age 8.”

OK, that's fair. Maybe I've been biased because I have some young relatives who were confirmed in early grade school.

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Religion.jpg
« Reply #404 on: May 01, 2019, 09:09:00 AM »
In Norway, confirmation was originally something that everyone had to go through to finish their education, or be punished, when Norway was a Danish theocracy. And only became voluntary in 1912.

At some point it became standardized to the year you turn 15, in the spring. Currently 15 is the minimum age that you can choose your own religious membership, a.k.a. the age of majority for religion. The confirmation process starts in the year before the year you turn 15. Meaning that you're not really considered able to make your own choice until it's too late to make it.

I'd change that to 18 and also make 18 the minimum age for membership. As of now, the vast majority of members in the former state church became members at age 0, and remain members because they haven't taken any decisions about their membership after they gained the right to.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't confirmation a major event in Norway, an important part of the culture? The Norwegian humanist group even offers secular confirmation for the non-religious, or at least anyone who doesn't want to have a confirmation in church.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 09:14:20 AM by Quetzalcoatl »
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