Author Topic: Re: Orthorexia  (Read 1407 times)

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Offline lonely moa

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2016, 11:29:57 AM »


My waist size is the same as it was 18 years ago so I guess Im ok?


Guess is a good word.  I could have said the same when I was having radiotherapy for cancer.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2016, 12:56:36 PM »
Nothing more annoying than someone righteously telling you how to eat.  Is telling someone how to eat without the righteousness still orthorexia?   I see all the usual suspects of orthorexia have already chimed in.  I'm not excluding myself.  I'll tell you how to eat.... Don't eat too much so that you are overweight and ride a bike a lot.
I get this alot. People often look at what I eat and haughtily tell me it will make me fat or whatever.
Welp. My waist size is the same as it was 18 years ago so I guess Im ok?
The people who give me shit are normally in somewhat of an ironic position to be giving out unsolicited advice.

I get the opposite: When I decline the dessert, people tell me "But you're so thin, you could eat this." I have to tell them that the reason I'm thin is because I don't eat the dessert every time it's offered. (I do eat it sometimes. And I've put on weight this half year because I've been more lax in my eating habits.)

As for being healthy because your waist size has not changed in 18 years, that does depend on what it was 18 years ago. ;D
Daniel
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2016, 03:39:06 PM »
The suffix -exia suggests a pathology, and yes, obsession with anything, even something good for you, can be pathological

I'm not sure what you're thinking of here, but this etymology is just wrong.  The Greek word "orexis" means "appetite," and the prefix "an" means "without."  The suffix "-ia" just makes it an abstract noun.  The word "anorexia" literally just means "lack of appetite."
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Offline estockly

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2017, 02:07:55 AM »
Anorexia is not a word using the suffix exia. Orthorexia is.


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Offline Harry Black

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2017, 06:58:27 AM »


My waist size is the same as it was 18 years ago so I guess Im ok?


Guess is a good word.  I could have said the same when I was having radiotherapy for cancer.
Im very confident that if I get cancer, my current diet is not going to be the cause.
Based on current information anyway.
I did probably do lots of damage before I found out I was celiac though.

Edit- My point was about obesity. I used waistline as a quick illustration but my fitness metrics are about the same as they were then too because I train bloody hard.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2017, 07:02:42 AM by Harry Black »

Offline estockly

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2017, 07:05:41 AM »
The science seems to indicate that cancer, along with heart disease, type2 diabetes and Alzheimers are all part of what's considered modern diseases or western diseases. And any population that switches from their indigenous diet to the western begins developing these diseases within one generation. This is pretty much universal, and the western diet is the one common factor and most likely suspect. It's possible that it simply may be the sugar in the western diet.


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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #21 on: January 01, 2017, 07:44:45 AM »
Anorexia is not a word using the suffix exia. Orthorexia is.

No, it's not. It's from the same root—"orexia," meaning "appetite" as anorexia—but with the prefix "orth(o)-" meaning "right" in front of it.  Where else do you think the letter "r" in the word comes from?  But if you don't believe someone trained in Greek and practiced in etymology (and capable of doing a web search to confirm his information before making his initial post), perhaps you will believe the man who coined the term and published the first article describing it in 1996, Steven Bratman, MD:

Quote
Orthorexia nervosa, as I defined it in 1996, indicates an unhealthy obsession with eating healthy food. The term is derived utilizing the Greek “orthos,” which means “right,” or “correct,” and is intended as a parallel with anorexia nervosa. I originally invented the word as a kind of “tease therapy” for my overly diet-obsessed patients. Over time, however, I came to understand that the term identifies a genuine eating disorder.

Source: http://www.orthorexia.com/what-is-orthorexia/
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #22 on: January 01, 2017, 08:44:45 AM »


My waist size is the same as it was 18 years ago so I guess Im ok?


Guess is a good word.  I could have said the same when I was having radiotherapy for cancer.
Im very confident that if I get cancer, my current diet is not going to be the cause.
Based on current information anyway.
I did probably do lots of damage before I found out I was celiac though.

Edit- My point was about obesity. I used waistline as a quick illustration but my fitness metrics are about the same as they were then too because I train bloody hard.

Indeed, waist size is, I believe, a good way to distinguish between a person who is fat, and a person who is muscular. We don't seem to have muscle right on the waist. Body-builders typically have slim waists even when they are otherwise bulky. I weigh myself daily because it's a constant struggle for me, as a compulsive overeater, to keep myself at a healthy weight. But when I gain weight, I know it's fat and not muscle because my waist size increases.
Daniel
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-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #23 on: January 01, 2017, 05:38:16 PM »
We don't seem to have muscle right on the waist. Body-builders typically have slim waists even when they are otherwise bulky.

You may be unusual.  The rest of us have what are called obliques, as well as abdominals.  Body builders train these obsessively. 

Waist to hip ratio is an indicator of insulin resistance, though.

I weigh myself daily to be sure I am eating enough.  Too active for my age, I reckon.
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Offline estockly

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #24 on: January 01, 2017, 05:40:38 PM »
Anorexia is not a word using the suffix exia. Orthorexia is.

No, it's not. It's from the same root—"orexia," meaning "appetite" as anorexia—but with the prefix "orth(o)-" meaning "right" in front of it.  Where else do you think the letter "r" in the word comes from?  But if you don't believe someone trained in Greek and practiced in etymology (and capable of doing a web search to confirm his information before making his initial post), perhaps you will believe the man who coined the term and published the first article describing it in 1996, Steven Bratman, MD:

Quote
Orthorexia nervosa, as I defined it in 1996, indicates an unhealthy obsession with eating healthy food. The term is derived utilizing the Greek “orthos,” which means “right,” or “correct,” and is intended as a parallel with anorexia nervosa. I originally invented the word as a kind of “tease therapy” for my overly diet-obsessed patients. Over time, however, I came to understand that the term identifies a genuine eating disorder.

Source: http://www.orthorexia.com/what-is-orthorexia/

http://www.dictionaryfocus.com/?action=definition&word=-exia

So he made up a word to tease patients and then realized that it's an condition and kept the tease name. Huh. Ok.


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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #25 on: January 01, 2017, 05:43:16 PM »
Which is your way of admitting that you're wrong?
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline estockly

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #26 on: January 01, 2017, 05:56:08 PM »
Yeah. Exia as a suffix does indicate pathology, but not for this word either.


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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #27 on: January 01, 2017, 06:46:03 PM »
We don't seem to have muscle right on the waist. Body-builders typically have slim waists even when they are otherwise bulky.

You may be unusual.  The rest of us have what are called obliques, as well as abdominals.  Body builders train these obsessively. 

Waist to hip ratio is an indicator of insulin resistance, though.

I weigh myself daily to be sure I am eating enough.  Too active for my age, I reckon.

I've never seen a body-builder with a large waist. Weightlifters, yes, but they typically have a lot of fat. A large waist indicates a higher fat-to-lean ratio, and a thin waist (proportional to body size) indicates a low fat-to lean ratio.
Daniel
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Offline lonely moa

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #28 on: January 01, 2017, 08:17:05 PM »
Not large, obviously cut.  Lovely, visible obliques.  Also, not a bodybuilder.

Yours may have atrophied from disuse, giving you a "small" waist.

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Offline estockly

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Re: Orthorexia
« Reply #29 on: January 02, 2017, 02:39:03 AM »
Why is he holding the LA TIMES? Is he a hostage?


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