Author Topic: The Breathalyzer  (Read 2654 times)

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Offline Friendly Angel

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #60 on: November 20, 2018, 01:31:45 AM »
What defines a growler is not so much the volume as the refillable jug from the pub characteristic.
Amend and resubmit.

Offline moj

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #61 on: November 20, 2018, 09:47:43 AM »
Connecticut has implied consent laws. Refusal to submit to a breath, blood, urine analysis will result in suspension of  license for 45 days and imposition of an ignition interlock device (1 year for first offense, 2 years for second offense, and 3 years for third offense). Drivers subject to ignition interlock device may not drive any vehicle not equipped with such a device.  The penalties are as great or greater than for failing the test.

That makes a lot more sense to me. I was really surprised so many people in the class said not to blow or didn't and only had to do a night in Jail. I know it varys by location but seems crazy that you can opt out and get less of a punishment than if convicted.

Online Calinthalus

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #62 on: November 20, 2018, 09:49:53 AM »
I don't know.  I don't like the idea that you can refuse a request and go to jail for that refusal.  I mean, if there's a warrant signed by a judge then fine...but otherwise it strikes me as a bad idea.
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Offline moj

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #63 on: November 20, 2018, 11:10:19 AM »
I don't know.  I don't like the idea that you can refuse a request and go to jail for that refusal.  I mean, if there's a warrant signed by a judge then fine...but otherwise it strikes me as a bad idea.

Whats to stop every drunk pulled over from just refusing the test then? There are different charges based on BAC but need to be tested to figure that out.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #64 on: November 20, 2018, 11:16:33 AM »
I don't know.  I don't like the idea that you can refuse a request and go to jail for that refusal.  I mean, if there's a warrant signed by a judge then fine...but otherwise it strikes me as a bad idea.

You agree to submit to the test upon request as a condition of licensing. Failure to submit is an administrative offense, resulting in the loss or restriction of driving privileges. One does not receive a prison sentence for it. As I said, license suspensions and ignition interlock devices.
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Online Calinthalus

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #65 on: November 20, 2018, 12:21:30 PM »
I read that wrong.  I read the 45 days as days in jail, not days with license suspended.


Still not sure I agree with it.  If an officer has enough probable cause (via driving erratically or failing non-invasive field sobriety tests) then there should be a mechanism to get a warrant to force you to do a BAC.  That would be reasonable.
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Offline seamas

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #66 on: November 20, 2018, 12:42:57 PM »
What defines a growler is not so much the volume as the refillable jug from the pub characteristic.

True
The name comes from the sound that escapes from the lid (from whatever old time container was used years ago.

Most of the places I've purchased them from (mostly all along the Northeast USA) refer 64 as a growler and 32 oz as a half growler or a "howler".
Then there are "crowlers" which are cans sealed right at the bar.


Offline seamas

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #67 on: November 20, 2018, 12:47:23 PM »
I don't know.  I don't like the idea that you can refuse a request and go to jail for that refusal.  I mean, if there's a warrant signed by a judge then fine...but otherwise it strikes me as a bad idea.

Whats to stop every drunk pulled over from just refusing the test then? There are different charges based on BAC but need to be tested to figure that out.

The cop can just arrest you.
He does not need the results of the breathalyzer (which are wildly inaccurate) to take you in. That one you breathe into is often not admissible--but refusing to blow can and often is a violation added on.
If you fail the field sobriety test, he or she will just arrest you, and administer a more accurate chemical test at the police station.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #68 on: November 20, 2018, 01:20:45 PM »
I read that wrong.  I read the 45 days as days in jail, not days with license suspended.


Still not sure I agree with it.  If an officer has enough probable cause (via driving erratically or failing non-invasive field sobriety tests) then there should be a mechanism to get a warrant to force you to do a BAC.  That would be reasonable.

Driving is not a right. If you choose to drive, you’ve agreed to the regulations that come along with it, including being subject to breathalyzer at any time. Anyone with a Connecticut license has signed a paper agreeing to submit to one upon request, and failure to do so is a violation of the terms under which the license was issued. Hence, you lose it.

And let me be clear: the police still need a warrant to compel a chemical test. You have a right to refuse, and you won’t be criminally charged for refusal.  You just don’t get to keep your license if you don’t comply with its terms.
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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: The Breathalyzer
« Reply #69 on: November 21, 2018, 04:20:34 PM »
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