Author Topic: Scientists Just Teleported an Object Into Space for the First Time  (Read 295 times)

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Offline John Albert

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Re: Scientists Just Teleported an Object Into Space for the First Time
« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2019, 06:25:42 PM »
This experiment really just provides more evidence for the nonlocality of quantum entanglement, by showing that entanglement can occur over astronomical distances.


This article is the best explanation I've seen. It is not "teleportation", it is quantum entanglement. Short answer: quantum entanglement can be established (quantum state can be sent) over radio (photos). This experiment, if valid, would be a record for longest distance of doing this.

I thought a rule of quantum entanglement is that no information can be transferred.

It is. You cannot use quantum entanglement to transmit information.

Here's a good explanation of why it won't work.

« Last Edit: September 16, 2019, 06:34:39 PM by John Albert »

Online gmalivuk

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Re: Scientists Just Teleported an Object Into Space for the First Time
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2019, 06:32:23 PM »
No information can be transferred instantaneously, and the entanglement itself doesn't transfer information, but neither of those is what's going on here.
The world is so exquisite with so much love and moral depth, that there is no reason to deceive ourselves with pretty stories for which there's little good evidence. Far better...is to look death in the eye and to be grateful every day for the brief but magnificent opportunity that life provides.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Scientists Just Teleported an Object Into Space for the First Time
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2019, 06:43:10 PM »
No information can be transmitted faster than light, but that’s not what they’re doing here.  In order to extract the information in the qubit without destroying entanglement, they have to measure both quints using the same method, then compare the two.  Only by comparing them can they know what the state was.  That requires a classical communication channel, meaning the info can’t move faster than light.

The action of measurement itself is problematic, even if both parties use the same method. Checking the quantum state of a particle would require an interaction with it, and the effects of individual quantum interactions are necessarily random.

So the only way to validate a change in the state would be to compare the two, which—as you pointed out—would necessitate a secondary channel of information.