Author Topic: Episode #601  (Read 4024 times)

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Online st3class

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2017, 02:01:53 PM »
I enjoyed it. We get Blue Apron once a month or so. It's a couple steps above my normal cooking skills, and recipes make it easy enough to execute those methods. What I like about it is that you come out with a complete meal, usually with at least one side dish to go with the main dish.

Here's an example of a recipe if that's helpful.

https://www.blueapron.com/recipes/creamy-tuscan-kale-egg-strata-with-apple-endive-salad

My main complaint is the packaging. So many things need to come bagged, which creates a lot of waste. That's the main reason we only use it once a month.
It's always more complicated than that.

Offline trschwartz

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #31 on: January 22, 2017, 07:58:50 AM »
I'm still getting error 404 for both ad-free episodes #601 and now  #602.

 I've sent a notice via the contact form last week but didn't get any answer back.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #32 on: January 22, 2017, 09:19:53 AM »
I enjoyed it. We get Blue Apron once a month or so. It's a couple steps above my normal cooking skills, and recipes make it easy enough to execute those methods. What I like about it is that you come out with a complete meal, usually with at least one side dish to go with the main dish.

Here's an example of a recipe if that's helpful.

https://www.blueapron.com/recipes/creamy-tuscan-kale-egg-strata-with-apple-endive-salad

My main complaint is the packaging. So many things need to come bagged, which creates a lot of waste. That's the main reason we only use it once a month.

Yes, thanks for that. Very helpful. It really looks to me as though the only difference between Blue Apron and a good cookbook is that with B.A. you don't need to go to the grocery store. And if a recipe calls for a spice that you don't normally use, you don't have to buy a whole jar. But I need to go to the grocery store anyway, for other things, and for other meals.

And while it may be cheaper than eating at a restaurant (where a real chef cooks the food, and does it better than you could possibly do from a recipe if you're not a trained or very experienced cook) it's certainly not going to be cheaper than if you use a cookbook and do your own shopping. And as you point out, there's all that packaging waste going to the landfill.

Joy of Cooking has a little poem about cooking: (Quoted from memory, maybe not exact.)

"Of course I'll gladly give the rule I make beat biscuits by,
though I ain't sure that you will make those biscuits same as I.
'Cuz cookin's like religion is, some's gifted and some ain't;
and rules don't no more make a cook than sermons make a saint."
Daniel
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-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline lonely moa

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2017, 12:01:32 PM »
I don't imagine "My Food Bag" (the NZ equivalent) would be keen to deliver to our farm, but I think I'l stick to eating mostly what comes from our soil and paddocks.  The lamb roast and fresh veggies for tea last night(plus the fresh strawberries and raspberries for pud) cooked simply and easily, kicked ass over any commercial food delivery product in every category.
"The home of the brave and the land of the free; the less you know, the better off you'll be"

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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #34 on: January 22, 2017, 12:13:04 PM »
I don't imagine "My Food Bag" (the NZ equivalent) would be keen to deliver to our farm, but I think I'l stick to eating mostly what comes from our soil and paddocks.  The lamb roast and fresh veggies for tea last night(plus the fresh strawberries and raspberries for pud) cooked simply and easily, kicked ass over any commercial food delivery product in every category.

I do miss my garden. I don't miss the work, but fresh veggies beat out anything you can get from a store, and anything you can get from a restaurant. We're agreed on that. But with my bad back I can't work a garden any more. I still go out to a veggie farm for fresh veggies in summer if I'm home, which I usually am not in summer. The other problem with a garden: I'd rather be hiking in Canada than staying home toiling in the soil.
Daniel
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Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2017, 03:20:32 PM »
But I'm still curious: Did you enjoy the meals from them?

They were tasty. The thing I liked about it (the one week we tried it) is it got me out of my comfort zone and I made a couple meals I wouldn't normally consider. Still, the amount of packaging was a deal breaker. Yes, they have instructions on recycling, most of what you get is not recyclable, mostly the "non-toxic" ice goo, whatever it is.

What you can do though is, sign up for the free week, get your freebies, then going forward opt out for each week. That way you can still read all the recipes and make the meals yourself. If you cancel, as I have, all access is cut off. But then, I have a shit ton of cookbooks, too many really.

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2017, 03:37:07 PM »
And while it may be cheaper than eating at a restaurant (where a real chef cooks the food, and does it better than you could possibly do from a recipe if you're not a trained or very experienced cook) it's certainly not going to be cheaper than if you use a cookbook and do your own shopping. And as you point out, there's all that packaging waste going to the landfill.

You know what makes the food of a trained cook so good, the extra salt and sugar you'd never be willing to put in your food at home.  My wife signed us up for the introductory offer from about a half dozen of those pre-prepped meal suppliers.  They have a number of advantages, as you say, saving money is only an advantage if you otherwise would just get food from  a restaurant.  That being said, the prices aren't that much more than a supermarket, just not as great a savings as they'd have you believe. IMHO, the biggest advantage is that you don't have to think about because they plan the whole meal and come with the appropriate portions.  The second biggest advantage, we don't have to shop, handy on account of the new baby.

It's probably good for a lot of folks who are intimidated by cooking because of it takes the thought and planning out of it.  If you've never cooked much, its a decent gateway.   

Not everyone can be a great cook but just about everyone can be a passable cook, the rules do make a cook just not a great cook.  That's where the boxes really help, they teach people that it isn't that hard to put together a decent meal. 

Most of the meals were pretty good, though I prefer spicier fair than is usually on offer and one provider in particular was exceptionally bland. 

Offline brilligtove

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2017, 03:43:33 PM »
And while it may be cheaper than eating at a restaurant (where a real chef cooks the food, and does it better than you could possibly do from a recipe if you're not a trained or very experienced cook) it's certainly not going to be cheaper than if you use a cookbook and do your own shopping. And as you point out, there's all that packaging waste going to the landfill.

You know what makes the food of a trained cook so good, the extra salt and sugar you'd never be willing to put in your food at home.  My wife signed us up for the introductory offer from about a half dozen of those pre-prepped meal suppliers.  They have a number of advantages, as you say, saving money is only an advantage if you otherwise would just get food from  a restaurant.  That being said, the prices aren't that much more than a supermarket, just not as great a savings as they'd have you believe. IMHO, the biggest advantage is that you don't have to think about because they plan the whole meal and come with the appropriate portions.  The second biggest advantage, we don't have to shop, handy on account of the new baby.

It's probably good for a lot of folks who are intimidated by cooking because of it takes the thought and planning out of it.  If you've never cooked much, its a decent gateway.   

Not everyone can be a great cook but just about everyone can be a passable cook, the rules do make a cook just not a great cook.  That's where the boxes really help, they teach people that it isn't that hard to put together a decent meal. 

Most of the meals were pretty good, though I prefer spicier fair than is usually on offer and one provider in particular was exceptionally bland.

And the butter. Salt, sugar, and butter.


Mmmmmmm. Butter.
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Offline amysrevenge

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2017, 03:55:10 PM »
Not everyone can be a great cook but just about everyone can be a passable cook,

There are so many things where this is true, and people don't believe it.  You can get like 80% quality with about 10% of the skill and effort (taking the absolute top end best-of-the-best as 100% for both).  In cooking, and in many other fields.
Big Mike
Calgary AB Canada

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2017, 05:10:59 PM »
I was probably 19 or 20 (so 48 or 49 years ago) when I bought a DIY pizza kit. It consisted of a bag of flour, a tiny can of tomato sauce, and a little bag of grated cheese. Mix the flour with some water, kneed it, roll it out, put the sauce and cheese on top, and bake it. It was good. But it was obvious that I didn't need the kit because I could buy the ingredients separately and make the exact same pizza.

So I can see the appeal of something like Blue Apron. But if I'd had a cookbook back then I probably could have made the pizza without the kit. It looks to me as though B.A. is just feeding you the cookbook one recipe at a time, so you don't have to page through the book. As for the shopping, doesn't everyone (or at least one person in every normal household) go shopping for groceries? Is it harder to buy the ingredients for that special cookbook meal for next week than to select a meal from the B.A. web site and order it for delivery next week?

Years later, when I lived in rural North Dakota I bought untreated seed wheat from the grain elevator (North Dakota hard red spring wheat: the best wheat in the world for bread-making, which is how N.D. got the nickname of the bread basket of the world) and milled it in my own flour mill and made my own tomato sauce from scratch, and had the best pizzas ever. And years after that I quit making pizza because a quarter of a pound of sharp, aged cheddar cheese, while delicious, is too many calories, and when I made a pizza I ate the whole thing.

But my point is that, based on the descriptions, there's very little value to be had from B.A. that you don't get from a cookbook.

And I disagree that the only reason food tastes better when made by a quality chef is all the unhealthy salt, butter, sugar, etc., they put into it, because a good chef can make a fabulous meal without that stuff, on request.
Daniel
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-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2017, 05:24:13 PM »
I don't really disagree with you but I do think there is value in what B.A. does for a lot of folks.  I suspect, the hurdle in cooking for the B.A. consumers is more is ignorance.  They don't know what they don't know about cooking.  B.A. gets them past that hurdle and on balance is likely a good think for it.  From your story, that little DIY pizza kit taught you a valuable lesson. 

Where the B.A. and their ilk have an advantage over most, but not all, cook books is that they have a recipe for a whole meal in one place instead of meat dishes one page, vegies on another.  It really makes it easy.  Again, mostly an advantage for neophytes.

It reminds me of stamps.com it took me years of listening to stamps.com adds on pretty much all my podcasts before I realized they weren't advertising to me or anyone like me.  They were advertising to small businesses that ship a lot.  Blue Apron is probably getting closer to their target audience than stamps.com, even if they also advertise to Daniel by mistake. 

ETA:  It also reminds me of a girlfriend I had years ago, my cooking skills blew her away.  I had a single cook book and a willingness to try.  B.A. is for those people. It also saves some time, maybe not enough for a retiree to care but enough for a new parent to care. 
« Last Edit: January 23, 2017, 05:27:18 PM by Ah.hell »

Offline Friendly Angel

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #41 on: January 23, 2017, 07:00:45 PM »
Seems to me the Blue Apron target audience is busy folks who live in small apartments and can't store 25lb bags of grains and 50 different kinds of spices, have small refrigerators, and not enough time to shop... but they want to cook something fancy every once in a while.
Amend and resubmit.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2017, 07:03:58 PM »
I don't really disagree with you but I do think there is value in what B.A. does for a lot of folks.  I suspect, the hurdle in cooking for the B.A. consumers is more is ignorance.  They don't know what they don't know about cooking.  B.A. gets them past that hurdle and on balance is likely a good think for it.  From your story, that little DIY pizza kit taught you a valuable lesson. 

Where the B.A. and their ilk have an advantage over most, but not all, cook books is that they have a recipe for a whole meal in one place instead of meat dishes one page, vegies on another.  It really makes it easy.  Again, mostly an advantage for neophytes.

It reminds me of stamps.com it took me years of listening to stamps.com adds on pretty much all my podcasts before I realized they weren't advertising to me or anyone like me.  They were advertising to small businesses that ship a lot.  Blue Apron is probably getting closer to their target audience than stamps.com, even if they also advertise to Daniel by mistake. 

ETA:  It also reminds me of a girlfriend I had years ago, my cooking skills blew her away.  I had a single cook book and a willingness to try.  B.A. is for those people. It also saves some time, maybe not enough for a retiree to care but enough for a new parent to care. 

Yeah, you make valid points.

As far as stamps.com, I disagree. Small businesses that ship a lot use a postage meter. My mother had a postage meter for her small business. Stamps.com advertises that you can save trips to the P.O. But the P.O. will sell you stamps by mail. So Stamps.com is kind of useless. With one caveat: It's kind of cool to be able to put your own picture on stamps. I did that for a while. Now that I mail so few letters, I buy commemorative stamps from the P.O. by mail, without ever going to the P.O.
Daniel
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-- Otto von Bismarck

Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #43 on: January 24, 2017, 09:28:25 AM »
The thing about stamps.com that confused me is that they compete with postage meters but advertise to everyone that listens to podcasts, the vast majority of whom have no need for either. 

Offline Lothian

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #44 on: January 25, 2017, 08:16:50 AM »
Still cannot access the premium content via iTunes. It is listed but will not play. Same for Episode 601.

 

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