Author Topic: Episode #601  (Read 4355 times)

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Offline sowellfan

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #60 on: January 31, 2017, 02:25:42 PM »
Yeah, it gets crazy confusing. One area's 'Garam masala' isn't the same as the 'garam masala' from another area. Sometimes it's whole spices, sometimes they want you to powder various things. As with so much cooking, there's very little standardization, but you'll see some things that are common across lots of recipes.

Anyways, here's the recipe I was cooking that called for 'curry leaves' (which were labeled as curry leaves in my local indian grocery store).

Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #61 on: January 31, 2017, 02:58:59 PM »
Yeah, it gets crazy confusing. One area's 'Garam masala' isn't the same as the 'garam masala' from another area. Sometimes it's whole spices, sometimes they want you to powder various things.

No true Indian would ever powder their spices. ;-)

Quote
Anyways, here's the recipe I was cooking that called for 'curry leaves' (which were labeled as curry leaves in my local indian grocery store).

Curry leaves? Coriander leaves? Oy! I've never played with those. Maybe I can get them here in ATL in the area we call "Chambodia". The rest I have...except for the ginger garlic paste which I assume is just ginger and garlic mashed together.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2017, 03:04:20 PM by gebobs »

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #62 on: February 01, 2017, 03:09:01 AM »
Coriander leaves are called cilantro in America.

Offline seamas

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #63 on: February 01, 2017, 11:47:06 AM »
I have found it funny that with all the cooking shows on television--especially back a couple years ago when the Food Network really took off, they all but ignored Indian food.
You'd see whole series devoted to Italian, Mexican, American Southern, BBQ, Grillingf, and various East Asian cooking---but I think I only ONCE saw anything remotely Indian (iirc it was Alton Brown making a Tandoori oven out of terra cotta pots).


Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #64 on: February 01, 2017, 01:42:33 PM »
I have found it funny that with all the cooking shows on television--especially back a couple years ago when the Food Network really took off, they all but ignored Indian food.
You'd see whole series devoted to Italian, Mexican, American Southern, BBQ, Grillingf, and various East Asian cooking---but I think I only ONCE saw anything remotely Indian (iirc it was Alton Brown making a Tandoori oven out of terra cotta pots).



Maybe because it's really difficult to make good Indian food? I don't know. I once had supper at the house of a friend of a friend. It was billed as Indian food. I never said this to any of the people involved, but it was terrible. It was a pleasant evening with pleasant people. But the food, yuck! My understanding is that Indian food involves the subtle combination of many spices, probably not something that is easy to do from a recipe or even a cooking show.

Just a thought.
Daniel
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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #65 on: February 02, 2017, 02:34:51 AM »
I think it's a regional thing. We have a heap of them here.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #66 on: February 02, 2017, 11:57:18 AM »
I think it's a regional thing. We have a heap of them here.

Indian restaurants, or Indian cooking shows?
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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #67 on: February 02, 2017, 03:06:07 PM »
DW is good with the Indian spices... not that tough.  But the papadum and naan and idli things... those never turn out right at home.
Amend and resubmit.

Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #68 on: February 03, 2017, 03:00:01 AM »
I think it's a regional thing. We have a heap of them here.

Indian restaurants, or Indian cooking shows?

Both.

Think of what Mexican food is like in the American Southwest. That's what Asian food is like in Australia.

Offline sowellfan

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #69 on: February 07, 2017, 01:38:13 PM »
I have found it funny that with all the cooking shows on television--especially back a couple years ago when the Food Network really took off, they all but ignored Indian food.
You'd see whole series devoted to Italian, Mexican, American Southern, BBQ, Grillingf, and various East Asian cooking---but I think I only ONCE saw anything remotely Indian (iirc it was Alton Brown making a Tandoori oven out of terra cotta pots).
Maybe because it's really difficult to make good Indian food? I don't know. I once had supper at the house of a friend of a friend. It was billed as Indian food. I never said this to any of the people involved, but it was terrible. It was a pleasant evening with pleasant people. But the food, yuck! My understanding is that Indian food involves the subtle combination of many spices, probably not something that is easy to do from a recipe or even a cooking show.

Just a thought.
IMHO it's really not that difficult, even less so if you're not worrying about using whole spices, and you use a pre-mixed 'curry powder' instead of individually adding the 4-5 powdered spices that might be in a recipe. Not sure what went wrong with the recipe that your friend made - but to my mouth most indian food isn't all that terribly exotic. I mean, there's a reason that it's gotten so crazy popular in the UK. At the base, you've usually got a bunch of onions that are cooked pretty good, then maybe garlic/ginger, then a bunch of tomato added and cooked down, and then spices, then meat. And the spice mix isn't that fussy, really.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #70 on: February 08, 2017, 09:37:00 AM »
I have found it funny that with all the cooking shows on television--especially back a couple years ago when the Food Network really took off, they all but ignored Indian food.
You'd see whole series devoted to Italian, Mexican, American Southern, BBQ, Grillingf, and various East Asian cooking---but I think I only ONCE saw anything remotely Indian (iirc it was Alton Brown making a Tandoori oven out of terra cotta pots).
Maybe because it's really difficult to make good Indian food? I don't know. I once had supper at the house of a friend of a friend. It was billed as Indian food. I never said this to any of the people involved, but it was terrible. It was a pleasant evening with pleasant people. But the food, yuck! My understanding is that Indian food involves the subtle combination of many spices, probably not something that is easy to do from a recipe or even a cooking show.

Just a thought.
IMHO it's really not that difficult, even less so if you're not worrying about using whole spices, and you use a pre-mixed 'curry powder' instead of individually adding the 4-5 powdered spices that might be in a recipe. Not sure what went wrong with the recipe that your friend made - but to my mouth most indian food isn't all that terribly exotic. I mean, there's a reason that it's gotten so crazy popular in the UK. At the base, you've usually got a bunch of onions that are cooked pretty good, then maybe garlic/ginger, then a bunch of tomato added and cooked down, and then spices, then meat. And the spice mix isn't that fussy, really.

I think the reason it's so popular in the U.K. is that English food is so horrid. ;D

I use "curry powder" in some of my cooking, and I quite like it. But it bears no resemblance to what I get in an Indian restaurant, or even the packaged Indian foods from the grocery store.
Daniel
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Offline brilligtove

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #71 on: February 08, 2017, 12:01:57 PM »
I have found it funny that with all the cooking shows on television--especially back a couple years ago when the Food Network really took off, they all but ignored Indian food.
You'd see whole series devoted to Italian, Mexican, American Southern, BBQ, Grillingf, and various East Asian cooking---but I think I only ONCE saw anything remotely Indian (iirc it was Alton Brown making a Tandoori oven out of terra cotta pots).
Maybe because it's really difficult to make good Indian food? I don't know. I once had supper at the house of a friend of a friend. It was billed as Indian food. I never said this to any of the people involved, but it was terrible. It was a pleasant evening with pleasant people. But the food, yuck! My understanding is that Indian food involves the subtle combination of many spices, probably not something that is easy to do from a recipe or even a cooking show.

Just a thought.
IMHO it's really not that difficult, even less so if you're not worrying about using whole spices, and you use a pre-mixed 'curry powder' instead of individually adding the 4-5 powdered spices that might be in a recipe. Not sure what went wrong with the recipe that your friend made - but to my mouth most indian food isn't all that terribly exotic. I mean, there's a reason that it's gotten so crazy popular in the UK. At the base, you've usually got a bunch of onions that are cooked pretty good, then maybe garlic/ginger, then a bunch of tomato added and cooked down, and then spices, then meat. And the spice mix isn't that fussy, really.

I think the reason it's so popular in the U.K. is that English food is so horrid. ;D

I use "curry powder" in some of my cooking, and I quite like it. But it bears no resemblance to what I get in an Indian restaurant, or even the packaged Indian foods from the grocery store.

A bit of curry powder in chicken noodle soup is quite lovely.
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Offline Ah.hell

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Re: Episode #601
« Reply #72 on: February 08, 2017, 12:15:11 PM »
I'll dump curry powder into almost anything, its great with the packaged ramen. 

 

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