Author Topic: Episode #602  (Read 3627 times)

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Offline Jeremy's Sea

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2017, 02:09:56 PM »
Interview with James Randi; Forgotten Superheroes of Science: Dorothy Andersen; News Items: E-Waste, IBM Predicts Future Tech, Returning to the Moon, Two Trillion Galaxies; Who’s That Noisy; Science or Fiction

Two Trillion Galaxies

Does this alter the ratio of matter to dark matter to dark energy?
I can barely comprehend the distances in our own solar system... seeing a galaxy through the Mt Wilson 60inch telescope just about blew my mind. I can't even fathom what this means. The universe must be filthy with life, but at such great distances we are for all purposes practically alone.
Knowledge is power. France is bacon.

Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2017, 02:11:10 PM »
I sort of couldn't believe that the Rogues didn't know that Svante Arrhenius published his thesis in 1896.  I thought every thinking person knows this.  Guess not.

Or that Cara seemingly did not know who Steve was talking about. I knew right off the bat that #1 was fiction and was pretty sure Steve was going to bring up Arrhenius. People think AGW is a new science. A lot of people are amazed that it is 100+ years in the making.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2017, 02:44:45 PM »
... why not buy some needy person the latest instead of pushing onto them what you yourself can no longer stand.

Because the topic was keeping electronics in use instead of sending them to the landfill or to a questionable recycler. The topic was not about helping people in the third world. I suspect there are much better ways of helping poor people than buying them a phone.

Aren't you then forcing the dilemma you're not dealing with onto the poor? Can the poor send your discard back to you if they quickly tire of it, too? They likely don't have better access to appropriate disposal than you do. Did you catch the sarcasm about buying someone a new phone? I question the magnanimity of this pass your trash forward gesture.

No. Because that poor person can choose to accept a free phone that confers no status and may be essentially useless except for making phone calls, or can choose to reject the offer and either buy a better phone or do without a phone.

I am never harming a person by offering a gift that the person can accept or decline.

BTW, I donate to causes I support. Donating my phone does not decrease the amount of money I donate. Donating the phone is simply saying, "This phone no longer serves my needs. If someone else wants it, here it is." I don't even think of it as a "donation" as much as a way that perhaps someone can get a bit more use out of it. Much the same way some people will leave old furniture on the curb. If someone wants it before the garbage truck comes, they can take it away.
Daniel
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Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #33 on: January 23, 2017, 02:47:36 PM »
Regarding WTN from last week about Bohemian Rhapsody being played on a "100+ year old fairground organ...so very cool and if you watch the video you will see it is also a beautiful piece of artwork.

Anyhoo, my grandfather bought a player piano back in 1916 and I recently inherited it. It's not as ornate as the organ but still in excellent working order. They still make the rolls too. Still mad by QRS in my hometown, Buffalo NY. We have probably 100 or so , from obscure oldies like "Who Threw The Overalls In Mrs. Murphy's Chowder" to classic standards like "Danny Boy" to more recent songs like good ol' "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitgerald". And it's push pedal so one even gets a bit of a workout playing the songs.

The organ...




Offline Jeremy's Sea

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #34 on: January 23, 2017, 02:50:14 PM »
I sort of couldn't believe that the Rogues didn't know that Svante Arrhenius published his thesis in 1896.  I thought every thinking person knows this.  Guess not.

Or that Cara seemingly did not know who Steve was talking about. I knew right off the bat that #1 was fiction and was pretty sure Steve was going to bring up Arrhenius. People think AGW is a new science. A lot of people are amazed that it is 100+ years in the making.
No one really teaches the history of science though. You pretty much have to be a scientist in a field, or deeply interested in a field to know facts like that from over 100 years ago. I find it incredibly unsurprising.
Knowledge is power. France is bacon.

Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2017, 02:54:51 PM »
I can barely comprehend the distances in our own solar system... seeing a galaxy through the Mt Wilson 60inch telescope just about blew my mind. I can't even fathom what this means. The universe must be filthy with life, but at such great distances we are for all purposes practically alone.

Separated as much by time as distance. We are only a few hundred years at exploring the universe through telescopes and only a few decades exploring even our own solar system with manned/unmanned missions. Could be civilizations are winking in and out all the time but unlikely that two would be proximate in both time and space.

Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2017, 03:01:12 PM »
No one really teaches the history of science though. You pretty much have to be a scientist in a field, or deeply interested in a field to know facts like that from over 100 years ago. I find it incredibly unsurprising.

That's why it seemed surprising to me. It seems to me that all the rogues are "deeply interested" in AGW.

Offline stlc8tr

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2017, 03:38:50 PM »
Has SGU ever done a segment on addiction?

From the on-air comments, it seems that the Rogues believe that quitting smoking is just a matter of will power. So if you nag someone enough, they will be able to quit.

Is that true?

Online Friendly Angel

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2017, 04:28:03 PM »
I can barely comprehend the distances in our own solar system... seeing a galaxy through the Mt Wilson 60inch telescope just about blew my mind. I can't even fathom what this means. The universe must be filthy with life, but at such great distances we are for all purposes practically alone.

If we were to scale the solar system (diameter of Neptune's orbit) to the size of a nickel (2cm), the Milky Way Galaxy would be the size of the continental USA (4,200 km diameter).

I like to say the nickel would be in San Francisco, but that's an alternate fact.

The idea that the universe must be filthy with life is not supported.  And also, life is not necessarily the most awesome thing in the universe... that idea is kind of conceited and unimaginative.
Amend and resubmit.

Offline colinc

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2017, 04:39:02 PM »
Add me to the list of subscribers unable to access premium content...

So it isn't just for me, that's a relief.

I'm getting error 404 for both ad-free episodes #601 and #602.

Is there anyway to get their attention about this issue, I've sent and notice via the contact form last week but didn't get any answer back.


 Me too!  Please fix Steve.


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Offline Jeremy's Sea

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2017, 05:21:53 PM »
I can barely comprehend the distances in our own solar system... seeing a galaxy through the Mt Wilson 60inch telescope just about blew my mind. I can't even fathom what this means. The universe must be filthy with life, but at such great distances we are for all purposes practically alone.

If we were to scale the solar system (diameter of Neptune's orbit) to the size of a nickel (2cm), the Milky Way Galaxy would be the size of the continental USA (4,200 km diameter).

I like to say the nickel would be in San Francisco, but that's an alternate fact.

The idea that the universe must be filthy with life is not supported.  And also, life is not necessarily the most awesome thing in the universe... that idea is kind of conceited and unimaginative.
I didn't say intelligent life. Just knowing how many earth like planets there are out there, it's only a numbers game and two trillion galaxies really opens up the possibilities. I fail to see how that's unimaginative or conceited. Bacteria like life in many bizarre forms is probably every where.  I don't know if you thought I was imagining the Star Trek version of aliens which look like us with odd nose ridges and weird foreheads.
Knowledge is power. France is bacon.

Offline Jeremy's Sea

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #41 on: January 23, 2017, 05:23:36 PM »
No one really teaches the history of science though. You pretty much have to be a scientist in a field, or deeply interested in a field to know facts like that from over 100 years ago. I find it incredibly unsurprising.

That's why it seemed surprising to me. It seems to me that all the rogues are "deeply interested" in AGW.
I fail to see your point. I have many interests that I am deeply invested in and almost everyday I learn something new about the history of them. Granted you aren't necessarily using your surprise as a pejorative the way Lonely Moa is.
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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2017, 06:58:01 PM »
I can barely comprehend the distances in our own solar system... seeing a galaxy through the Mt Wilson 60inch telescope just about blew my mind. I can't even fathom what this means. The universe must be filthy with life, but at such great distances we are for all purposes practically alone.

If we were to scale the solar system (diameter of Neptune's orbit) to the size of a nickel (2cm), the Milky Way Galaxy would be the size of the continental USA (4,200 km diameter).

I like to say the nickel would be in San Francisco, but that's an alternate fact.

The idea that the universe must be filthy with life is not supported.  And also, life is not necessarily the most awesome thing in the universe... that idea is kind of conceited and unimaginative.
I didn't say intelligent life. Just knowing how many earth like planets there are out there, it's only a numbers game and two trillion galaxies really opens up the possibilities. I fail to see how that's unimaginative or conceited. Bacteria like life in many bizarre forms is probably every where.  I don't know if you thought I was imagining the Star Trek version of aliens which look like us with odd nose ridges and weird foreheads.

I didn't mean you specifically, sorry.  I meant modern humans in general.  I like to imagine that there's something even more amazing than life, even intelligent life, and we can't even imagine what that might be... because we're just lowly intelligent beings.

Amend and resubmit.

Offline Jeremy's Sea

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #43 on: January 23, 2017, 07:11:24 PM »
I can barely comprehend the distances in our own solar system... seeing a galaxy through the Mt Wilson 60inch telescope just about blew my mind. I can't even fathom what this means. The universe must be filthy with life, but at such great distances we are for all purposes practically alone.

If we were to scale the solar system (diameter of Neptune's orbit) to the size of a nickel (2cm), the Milky Way Galaxy would be the size of the continental USA (4,200 km diameter).

I like to say the nickel would be in San Francisco, but that's an alternate fact.

The idea that the universe must be filthy with life is not supported.  And also, life is not necessarily the most awesome thing in the universe... that idea is kind of conceited and unimaginative.
I didn't say intelligent life. Just knowing how many earth like planets there are out there, it's only a numbers game and two trillion galaxies really opens up the possibilities. I fail to see how that's unimaginative or conceited. Bacteria like life in many bizarre forms is probably every where.  I don't know if you thought I was imagining the Star Trek version of aliens which look like us with odd nose ridges and weird foreheads.

I didn't mean you specifically, sorry.  I meant modern humans in general.  I like to imagine that there's something even more amazing than life, even intelligent life, and we can't even imagine what that might be... because we're just lowly intelligent beings.
I'm waiting to find intelligent machine life in a dyson sphere! That stuff is going to blow our minds when we find an intelligence spread across a nebula. Like the Dr Novella often says, whatever we find we're never going to be able to predict it, it will be so crazy alien we may not even recognize it. You're right, the fixation on life like ours is prohibitive to finding what is really out there.
Knowledge is power. France is bacon.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #602
« Reply #44 on: January 23, 2017, 07:11:30 PM »
I can barely comprehend the distances in our own solar system... seeing a galaxy through the Mt Wilson 60inch telescope just about blew my mind. I can't even fathom what this means. The universe must be filthy with life, but at such great distances we are for all purposes practically alone.

If we were to scale the solar system (diameter of Neptune's orbit) to the size of a nickel (2cm), the Milky Way Galaxy would be the size of the continental USA (4,200 km diameter).

I like to say the nickel would be in San Francisco, but that's an alternate fact.

The idea that the universe must be filthy with life is not supported.  And also, life is not necessarily the most awesome thing in the universe... that idea is kind of conceited and unimaginative.
I didn't say intelligent life. Just knowing how many earth like planets there are out there, it's only a numbers game and two trillion galaxies really opens up the possibilities. I fail to see how that's unimaginative or conceited. Bacteria like life in many bizarre forms is probably every where.  I don't know if you thought I was imagining the Star Trek version of aliens which look like us with odd nose ridges and weird foreheads.

I didn't mean you specifically, sorry.  I meant modern humans in general.  I like to imagine that there's something even more amazing than life, even intelligent life, and we can't even imagine what that might be... because we're just lowly intelligent beings.

"Amazing" is a subjective term. To us, as living, conscious animals, life is probably the most "amazing" thing out there. But of course, I am constantly amazed by the news that comes out of astronomy and cosmology. Dark energy, e.g., is pretty darn amazing.

Count me as one who believes (even though I cannot prove) that the universe is "filthy" with life. Though I might have said "teeming" rather than "filthy." I further believe that most of that is not what we would consider intelligent, and some of it is, and most of the intelligent life is probably in forms we would not recognize as intelligent, for being too different from ourselves. After all, it has not been all that long since humans finally started to recognize the intelligence of our fellow creatures right here on Earth.
Daniel
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