Author Topic: Is "cut me for a lion's share" an American cultural reference?  (Read 796 times)

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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Is "cut me for a lion's share" an American cultural reference?
« on: January 24, 2017, 06:18:14 PM »
I have been listening to some old favorites I have not been listening to for years. And so I was listening to a song by The Offspring called Nothing From Something. Part of the lyrics goes like:

Quote
Cut me for the lion's share
It's mindless but I don't care
'Cause no matter what I say
I'm in a another fight
Take more shit, I've had enough
Tonight I'm gonna rip it up
Broken windows cure my ills and make me feel alright

Does "cut me for a lion's share" mean something in English? Some cultural connection to somewhere (if so, probably the USA or more specifically California)? Googling it only turned out references to this song without much further information. I know "lion's share" means "the biggest piece".

I know that The Offspring makes heavy use of various American and Californian slangs and phrases not always easily picked up by outsiders. For example, they have a song called Pay the Man with part of the lyrics like the following:

Quote
Look at you and your struggle for freedom
But you ain't nothing
We all pay the man for living

Wouldn't it be nice for a change now
To be unchained
My life is for me now

But this is life
This is life
This is life
This is life

Pay the man
No
Pay the man
No
Pay the man
No
It's our life
No no no

Apparently "the man" is American slang for "government".

Another of their songs is called Come Out And Play which is about youth gang violence in California and the behavior and tactics of the gangs. Not easily picked up unless you are already familiar with the references (or read up about it, like I did).
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Online Friendly Angel

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Re: Is "cut me for a lion's share" an American cultural reference?
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2017, 07:00:46 PM »
Does "cut me for a lion's share" mean something in English? Some cultural connection to somewhere (if so, probably the USA or more specifically California)?

Not to my California knowledge, sounds like some poetic license for "give me the lion's share".  "Cut me in" means to include me in the deal though.



Apparently "the man" is American slang for "government".


"The Man" is authority, in general... might be government, cops, school principal, employment boss, etc.
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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Is "cut me for a lion's share" an American cultural reference?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2017, 08:02:32 PM »
"The lion's share is an idiomatic expression which refers to the major share of something. The phrase derives from the plot of a number of fables ascribed to Aesop and is used here as their generic title.
Lion's share - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion's_share"
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Offline brilligtove

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Re: Is "cut me for a lion's share" an American cultural reference?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2017, 10:49:30 PM »
"The lion's share is an idiomatic expression which refers to the major share of something. The phrase derives from the plot of a number of fables ascribed to Aesop and is used here as their generic title.
Lion's share - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion's_share"

Can we cross link this to the useless (but fascinating) fact of the day? :) I had no idea Aesop was involved.
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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Is "cut me for a lion's share" an American cultural reference?
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2017, 03:58:38 PM »
Does "cut me for a lion's share" mean something in English? Some cultural connection to somewhere (if so, probably the USA or more specifically California)?

Not to my California knowledge, sounds like some poetic license for "give me the lion's share".  "Cut me in" means to include me in the deal though.

Ah that's what it might mean then I guess. So not literally or even metaphorically cutting someone then?


Apparently "the man" is American slang for "government".


"The Man" is authority, in general... might be government, cops, school principal, employment boss, etc.

And then I guess "pay" in that context might not literally refer to paying someone either?
"Large skepticism leads to large understanding. Small skepticism leads to small understanding. No skepticism leads to no understanding." - Xi Zhi

 

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