Author Topic: 25 second Delays to Influence Snack Choice  (Read 398 times)

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Offline HighPockets

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25 second Delays to Influence Snack Choice
« on: March 31, 2017, 02:38:33 PM »
Interesting proposition, but I don't think 25 seconds is long enough to keep me from my peanut M&Ms.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/03/31/522189753/forcing-people-at-vending-machines-to-wait-nudges-them-to-buy-healthier-snacks

It would take up to a minute or more before I would turn to the bag of plain peanuts below the bar.
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Online Mr. Beagle

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Re: 25 second Delays to Influence Snack Choice
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2017, 03:46:41 PM »
Interesting proposition, but I don't think 25 seconds is long enough to keep me from my peanut M&Ms.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/03/31/522189753/forcing-people-at-vending-machines-to-wait-nudges-them-to-buy-healthier-snacks

It would take up to a minute or more before I would turn to the bag of plain peanuts below the bar.

In one of my favorite studies, students who had to memorize a seven-digit number were much more likely to choose chocolate cake when offered a choice between that and fruit, than were students who had to memorize a two-digit number.

https://whywereason.com/2011/11/22/why-shouldnt-you-shop-while-hungry-ego-depletion-and-the-brain-as-a-muscle/

If this study is accurate, our stress-eating line in very fragile. I will attest that mine is very fragile, moving me to chocolate at the slightest stress.
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Offline 2397

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Re: 25 second Delays to Influence Snack Choice
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2017, 04:39:02 PM »
That sounds very annoying. I want my technology to have as fast a response time as possible.

I would've expected the main effect to be reduced sales. Although I wasn't one to buy snacks at the cafeteria or vending machines, because it was far more expensive than buying it at the grocery store. As were the sandwiches. It was never worth it to me, outside of very rare circumstances.

Quote
And there might be ways to take it beyond vending machines, Appelhans says. You could make it so that filling up a smart shopping cart with healthy foods would kick you to a fast checkout lane at a supermarket, for instance.

That's definitely something that would make me avoid the stores that did this. Also, stores already play on people's impulses. If they were interested in influencing people towards healthier choices, there are other things that need to be done differently.

Online SkeptiQueer

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Re: 25 second Delays to Influence Snack Choice
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2017, 05:45:54 PM »
Yeah, this is trying to mount the camel backwards. The problem is less with people and more with the industry that spends vuttloads of money to manipulate people.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: 25 second Delays to Influence Snack Choice
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2017, 06:04:00 PM »
Occasionally I'll be at a hotel and I want a snack. I go to the vending machine. I never find a snack I want. I end up returning to my room and going without, which is far more healthy than if they had "healthy" snacks.
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Offline estockly

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Re: 25 second Delays to Influence Snack Choice
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2017, 06:42:50 PM »
Occasionally I'll be at a hotel and I want a snack. I go to the vending machine. I never find a snack I want. I end up returning to my room and going without, which is far more healthy than if they had "healthy" snacks.

Why do you think that's healthier?

If you're hungry or want a snack, it may be that your body is telling you it needs energy or some nutrient. When you go without your body doesn't get what it needs.

Unless the snack craving is a sign of addiction. But haven't you ridiculed the concept of sugar is addictive?

I personally think it's healthier to avoid vending machine snacks, because in my experience very little, if any, of the snacks in vending machines are not extraordinarily high in sugar, and other fast/simple carbs that will spike blood sugar/insulin.

So I agree with that sentiment, and it's totally consistent with the LCHF alternate theory of nutrition.

But you have vehemently disagreed with that theory in the past.

So by what logic is not healthy to opt for so called "healthy" snacks from a vending machine?
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