Author Topic: Sci-Fi story help  (Read 3488 times)

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Online arthwollipot

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #60 on: May 09, 2017, 09:57:40 PM »
Which is why a simple fusion battery in every device is much more reliable than having multiple interacting power distribution systems. :D

And it means that consoles are less likely to explode in showers of sparks when you get hit by a torpedo.

Online Desert Fox

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #61 on: May 09, 2017, 11:45:00 PM »
Which is why a simple fusion battery in every device is much more reliable than having multiple interacting power distribution systems. :D

And it means that consoles are less likely to explode in showers of sparks when you get hit by a torpedo.

Only Star Trek has exploding consoles
Assuming that power systems need maintenance, every separate system will add to complexity.
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Online arthwollipot

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #62 on: May 10, 2017, 02:20:34 AM »
Which is why a simple fusion battery in every device is much more reliable than having multiple interacting power distribution systems. :D

And it means that consoles are less likely to explode in showers of sparks when you get hit by a torpedo.

Only Star Trek has exploding consoles
Assuming that power systems need maintenance, every separate system will add to complexity.
Yeah, it's a bit of a characteristic conceit of my future vision that power systems are as easy and simple to maintain as batteries, but virtually perpetual.

Online Desert Fox

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #63 on: May 13, 2017, 07:04:45 PM »
Faster than light travel in my science fiction is by jumping through wormholes which are form through some kind of gravity interaction with the stars and the rest of the universe.
They tend to form on a G2 class star somewhere around Pluto orbit or around 6 light hours out.
Smaller stars they form closer in while larger stars form further out.

Now what I am curious about is assume that a star is around 8 solar masses.
It has wormholes really far out as one might expect. Probably be something like 45 light hours out from the star.

An 8 solar mass star can go super nova and leaves a core of several solar masses behind.
This then becomes a neutron star.

What should I have happen with wormholes around the neutron star? I am not too worried about black holes because I believe that neutron stars are far more common.
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Online Desert Fox

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #64 on: May 28, 2017, 08:24:42 PM »
I have a general writing question. When there is a conversation and a lot of one liners, (for example: Jack says, "the Earth is flat." Jane responds, "No it is not!") are you suppose to start a new paragraph whenever you switch speakers. That is what I remember being taught but in some novels, I don't see the authors doing that.
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Online 2397

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #65 on: May 28, 2017, 08:32:58 PM »
I'd say go for whichever feels like it flows better.

Then get a second opinion.

Online arthwollipot

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #66 on: May 28, 2017, 08:43:54 PM »
I have a general writing question. When there is a conversation and a lot of one liners, (for example: Jack says, "the Earth is flat." Jane responds, "No it is not!") are you suppose to start a new paragraph whenever you switch speakers. That is what I remember being taught but in some novels, I don't see the authors doing that.
Yes, when you switch speakers, you generally start a new paragraph. That's the rule.

Of course it's totally okay to break this rule when you have a dramatic and/or stylistic reason for doing so.

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #67 on: May 28, 2017, 08:55:36 PM »
I have a general writing question. When there is a conversation and a lot of one liners, (for example: Jack says, "the Earth is flat." Jane responds, "No it is not!") are you suppose to start a new paragraph whenever you switch speakers. That is what I remember being taught but in some novels, I don't see the authors doing that.
Yes, when you switch speakers, you generally start a new paragraph. That's the rule.

Of course it's totally okay to break this rule when you have a dramatic and/or stylistic reason for doing so.

OK, at least I remember right  :-[
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Online arthwollipot

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #68 on: May 28, 2017, 09:14:20 PM »
I have a general writing question. When there is a conversation and a lot of one liners, (for example: Jack says, "the Earth is flat." Jane responds, "No it is not!") are you suppose to start a new paragraph whenever you switch speakers. That is what I remember being taught but in some novels, I don't see the authors doing that.
Yes, when you switch speakers, you generally start a new paragraph. That's the rule.

Of course it's totally okay to break this rule when you have a dramatic and/or stylistic reason for doing so.

OK, at least I remember right  :-[
I firmly believe that English grammar and style exist for a very good reason - ease of reading. However, I originally came up with Rule 0 to refer to the rules of grammar.

Rule 0 states: all rules have exceptions, including this one.

It describes grammar, but it's also applicable to all other systems that have rules. :)

Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #69 on: June 25, 2017, 10:16:49 PM »
Each speaker gets his own line. And once in a while throw in something to help us keep them straight, like:

Frank looked at Joe like he was an idea. Joe had to defend his idea.

For me, six lines tops without a helper like that.
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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #70 on: January 03, 2018, 01:57:30 AM »
I kind of got distracted but getting back into working on the story again

Say you want a group of special forces people who you can us on an "off the books" mission that is also extremely dangerous. You recruit from prison for ex-special forces. Deal is that if you do the mission, we will absolve you of your crimes. Get a pardon although you keep quiet on why.

You don't want crazies though. What are crimes that one could have been convicted of where they would be reasonably safe to use but still lengthy enough prison sentences for this to be an attractive option.  One I am thinking is that a combat medic was in a hovercraft accident with another vehicle where the pilot put the vehicle on manual while under the influence of drugs. Combat medic survived the accident but killed the passenger (maybe sister) and murdered the the other pilot.
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Online 2397

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #71 on: January 03, 2018, 09:56:35 AM »
So they all used to be special forces? I guess it depends on how over the top the sentences are. Desertion, misuse of equipment, committing an offense against a superior officer. Smuggling.

Offline DaveD

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Re: Sci-Fi story help
« Reply #72 on: January 03, 2018, 10:26:51 AM »
Regardless of the crime they committed, they would additionally need to go through a psychological assessment as to suitability,

 

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