Author Topic: Tech.jpg  (Read 38524 times)

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Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #165 on: October 29, 2018, 07:11:42 AM »
I remember being a freshman in college and learning HTML and XML like really, really well and thinking I was the shit. Then I hit second semester of CS and learned what true horror was with C.
Took a class on C. First thing the prof says is "NEVER fly in a plane programmed in C." I took that to heart. Had no clue how to find out how the plane was "programmed" and Homeland Security started taking notice, but it sounded like good advice at the time.
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline stands2reason

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #166 on: October 29, 2018, 09:49:17 AM »
I remember being a freshman in college and learning HTML and XML like really, really well and thinking I was the shit. Then I hit second semester of CS and learned what true horror was with C.

Because XHTML isn't a programming language?

I remember being a freshman in college and learning HTML and XML like really, really well and thinking I was the shit. Then I hit second semester of CS and learned what true horror was with C.
Took a class on C. First thing the prof says is "NEVER fly in a plane programmed in C." I took that to heart. Had no clue how to find out how the plane was "programmed" and Homeland Security started taking notice, but it sounded like good advice at the time.

Although if they use C++ with exception-handling disabled, which I have seen in embedded systems before, you still get the same undefined behavior, i.e. memory corruption and crash.

Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #167 on: October 29, 2018, 11:05:17 AM »
Although if they use C++ with exception-handling disabled, which I have seen in embedded systems before, you still get the same undefined behavior, i.e. memory corruption and crash.
It was the "crash" part...
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline stands2reason

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #168 on: October 29, 2018, 12:53:13 PM »
Although if they use C++ with exception-handling disabled, which I have seen in embedded systems before, you still get the same undefined behavior, i.e. memory corruption and crash.
It was the "crash" part...

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/car-balk/

Quote
At a computer expo (COMDEX), Bill Gates reportedly compared the computer industry with the auto industry and stated: “If GM had kept up with the technology like the computer industry has, we would all be driving $25.00 cars that got 1,000 miles to the gallon.”

In response to Bill’s comments, General Motors issued a press release (by Mr. Welch himself) stating:
 

If GM had developed technology like Microsoft, we would all be driving cars with the following characteristics:

1. For no reason at all, your car would crash twice a day.

2. Every time they repainted the lines on the road, you would have to buy a new car.

3. Occasionally, executing a manoeuver such as a left-turn would cause your car to shut down and refuse to restart, and you would have to reinstall the engine.

4. When your car died on the freeway for no reason, you would just accept this, restart and drive on.

5. Only one person at a time could use the car, unless you bought ‘Car95’ or ‘CarNT’, and then added more seats.

6. Apple would make a car powered by the sun, reliable, five times as fast, and twice as easy to drive, but would run on only five per cent of the roads.

7. Oil, water temperature and alternator warning lights would be replaced by a single ‘general car default’ warning light.

8. New seats would force every-one to have the same size butt.

9. The airbag would say ‘Are you sure?’ before going off.

10. Occasionally, for no reason, your car would lock you out and refuse to let you in until you simultaneously lifted the door handle, turned the key, and grabbed the radio antenna.

11. GM would require all car buyers to also purchase a deluxe set of road maps from Rand-McNally (a subsidiary of GM), even though they neither need them nor want them. Trying to delete this option would immediately cause the car’s performance to diminish by 50 per cent or more. Moreover, GM would become a target for investigation by the Justice Department.

12. Every time GM introduced a new model, car buyers would have to learn how to drive all over again because none of the controls would operate in the same manner as the old car.

13. You would press the ‘start’ button to shut off the engine.

Offline st3class

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #169 on: October 29, 2018, 03:42:59 PM »
I remember being a freshman in college and learning HTML and XML like really, really well and thinking I was the shit. Then I hit second semester of CS and learned what true horror was with C.
Took a class on C. First thing the prof says is "NEVER fly in a plane programmed in C." I took that to heart. Had no clue how to find out how the plane was "programmed" and Homeland Security started taking notice, but it sounded like good advice at the time.


This is going to be more information than anybody has asked for, but I've worked in aviation software, and the language I used was...C!

There's actually good reason for using C for aviation software. If you use it for that purpose, C is completely deterministic. No garbage collection means you always know when your memory will be allocated (assuming you don't use malloc, which aviation software largely doesn't, static memory only). The level of testing and audits done on aviation software is quite robust. Every line of code MUST be tested, and full traceability must be established between requirements, code, and tests. That and every line must be reviewed by 2 different people. The FAA has a delightful document called DO-178B, which outlines all these procedures.
It's always more complicated than that.

Offline Noisy Rhysling

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #170 on: October 29, 2018, 03:55:14 PM »
The FAA people are on the site of an airliner crash, nose first into a hill. A perky lady reporter corners the head investigator and shoves a mic in his face.

"Do we know who was the first person on the scene of the accident?"

"Yeah, the pilot."
"Sunday's horoscope is note worthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly unpredictable and inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." Your Horoscope" L.A. Evening Herald Express, Sat, 12/06/41

Offline John Albert

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #171 on: November 03, 2018, 04:31:11 PM »

Offline Soldier of FORTRAN

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #172 on: November 03, 2018, 08:41:11 PM »
If global warming is real then how come I just felt this chill down my spine?

Offline Soldier of FORTRAN

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #173 on: November 04, 2018, 01:57:41 AM »
If global warming is real then how come I just felt this chill down my spine?

Offline Desert Fox

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #174 on: November 04, 2018, 02:48:24 PM »
I thought this was extreely interesting, the history of Cyrix
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #175 on: November 04, 2018, 04:33:53 PM »
I remember being a freshman in college and learning HTML and XML like really, really well and thinking I was the shit. Then I hit second semester of CS and learned what true horror was with C.
Took a class on C. First thing the prof says is "NEVER fly in a plane programmed in C." I took that to heart. Had no clue how to find out how the plane was "programmed" and Homeland Security started taking notice, but it sounded like good advice at the time.

Ha ha, but in all seriousness, basically all operating systems are written in C. That includes kernel, system software, and also most embedded programs. (In case you wondered, that timer power supply I made a while back was programmed in C, AVR-GCC.)

Quote
There's actually good reason for using C for aviation software. If you use it for that purpose, C is completely deterministic.

Deterministic means something else considering multi-core systems. In which case you definitely want/need C++11 (or higher) std::thread and std::atomic. C has no defined standard of how it multi-threads, or even how it atomically updates memory shared between threads/processes, other than being able to use volatile variables. You use the threading system defined by your OS via its API.

C++ also adds memory safety to all of its data structures (unless you do C-style stuff in it with void pointers or unions). An exception might still happen, but the system can catch an exception in a sub-module and restart it, or not, go into failsafe mode, whatever. The exception system doesn't have any more overhead than assert statements—exception checks like array bounds effective have zero cost on any modern CPU because of branch prediction. But when an exception does happen, you get something more useful than your program halting.

When we say embedded system, are we saying a computer-on-a-chip with a RTOS (Real-Time Operating System), or are we talking about microcontrollers where the embedded program itself is the only thing running. In the first case, exception handling can basically be implemented by breaking a system into processes, adding a hypervisor/watchdog process, etc.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #176 on: November 04, 2018, 04:34:29 PM »
Samsung's first tablet - made in 1992!


Offline John Albert

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #177 on: November 04, 2018, 11:14:20 PM »

Offline Mr. Beagle

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #178 on: November 05, 2018, 10:08:14 AM »
Samsung's first tablet - made in 1992!



Tablet technology seems to have stalled. Apple continues to play with the high end, and I like my Surface Pro in many ways, but Microsoft still doesn't have the tablet part down yet. My heaviest-used technology is an aging 8-inch Samsung tablet. I was hoping by now there would be a cheap Chromebook tablet available that would combine the best of the Android tablet experience with a functional computer, but I have not been impressed with the first offerings.

I bought one of the first Samsung cheap Chromebooks for the grandkids several years ago now and was impressed, but no one seems to be pushing the low end of the price-value scale.
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Offline Desert Fox

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Re: Tech.jpg
« Reply #179 on: November 05, 2018, 08:07:07 PM »
Trouble with a chromebook is that you have to be connected to the internet to use effectively.
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

 

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