Author Topic: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread  (Read 19845 times)

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Offline The Latinist

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #315 on: August 12, 2019, 03:54:33 PM »
So I drove down to a garage first think this morning. I knew that the owner knew my father, which gave me an in. He said he thought it would be okay to drive with four, but I mentioned that we’d had one on the other side break just last week, so he decided to check the torque on the remaining lugs on that wheel.  One of the remaining four twisted right off with hardly any force at all.  Guess we’d have to fix it after all.

He quickly ordered two studs, then said he’d check to see if he had anything else that would work.  Seems that when they replace wheel bearings the kits come with aftermarket hubs that they don’t use. Sure enough, they had them. He popped a couple of those out and replaced the ones in my hub.  I was out of there in 45 minutes, and the guy charged me just $50 (I paid cash and gave him a generous tip).  By contrast, at the dealer on Friday we paid $160 to replace one.

Guy said he works on a lot of Subaru’s and he’s never seen any with this issue. He’s as much at a loss to explain it as anyone else I’ve talked to. I think when I get back to CT I’ll order new ones for all four wheels and replace them all.
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Offline Desert Fox

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #316 on: August 14, 2019, 03:45:47 PM »

Edit: Can I just run a new line from the main vacuum line to the transmission?

Sure, As long as it is getting direct manifold vacuum it will work fine. There can't be any check valves between the engine and the transmission. When the throttle is opened the vacuum signal needs to drop in order for the transmission to react properly to the increased load.

A few things
1. No leakage from the modulator.
2. The vacuum line seems intact and goes all the way to the vacuum tree.
3. I cannot find what appears to be a plastic framed dacron filter
4. Talked to my mechanic and he said that I need to be concerned when I remove the filter that a valve could come out? Do you know if there is a valve held up by the filter?
5. I found a wide range of costs for rebuilding transmissions - On the high side, a women said 2500 to 5000. A local one said 1500 if I pull it and 2000 if they pull it. Finally, I found someone who said he would tear down the transmission for $50 and would rebuild for $450 + cost of parts if he can. Used I can get one from a Junkyard for $500.

Let you know more once I get the filter replaced. 
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
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Offline BilLumberg

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #317 on: August 14, 2019, 08:15:07 PM »
This is what the later filters look like. Try a 1996 two wheel drive ranger as an application (engine won't matter), that is the only option on the later units. Nothing will come out with the filter, it just unbolts. Just make sure the O-rings are on the new filter. C4s did have a check valve under the filter on older cars. We get about $2200-$2500 to do these installed.


Offline Desert Fox

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« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 09:04:29 PM by Desert Fox »
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

Offline BilLumberg

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #319 on: August 15, 2019, 10:41:23 AM »
The first one is for a 4X4. If you look closely there is a tube around the suction hole for the deeper pan. The second one (part #58840) will fit. Here is the wix detail page where it shows '89-'11 2WD, with a better picture. Pre-'89 had a different pan so they wont fit those, but it should fit your car. The only way it won't work is if someone changed the pan to the older style for some reason. These are a much better filter than the older screen design.

http://www.wixfilters.com/Lookup/PartDetails.aspx?Part=105684


Offline Desert Fox

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #320 on: August 15, 2019, 02:48:35 PM »
The 58840 is the one you linked to on the Wix website and the same one I ordered from O'Reilly. 
It is a little more expensive but from what I have read Wix filters are suppose to be good filters.
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Offline Desert Fox

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #321 on: August 16, 2019, 11:30:38 PM »
Alright, finally got a chance to remove the transmission pan. Damn, I hate being covered in transmission fluid. Even got some in my hair. Wish they just put drain plugs in transmissions.

It is good news. When all done and I drove the car, shifted fine. Even brought it up to 70 mph and did good up to that speed. Wanted to make sure that the overdrive did not have any issues.

When I removed the pan, I did not find any metal flakes in the pan but it was very dark, indicating it was pretty old.  Swirled it around to try to make sure I did not see any metal flakes. With the amount of fluid that I had in the drain pan when all done, I also wonder if it was not low. Still, I had checked it on the transmission dipstick hot as per the instructions on the stick and seems to be at the right level.

Used the new Wix filter and very cautiously tightened the pan bolts so that they would not pinch the seal. Did not want to have to replace the seal and lose all the fluid. I went with Slick 50 for transmissions.
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

Offline stands2reason

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #322 on: August 17, 2019, 10:16:38 AM »
When I removed the pan, I did not find any metal flakes in the pan but it was very dark, indicating it was pretty old.  Swirled it around to try to make sure I did not see any metal flakes. With the amount of fluid that I had in the drain pan when all done, I also wonder if it was not low. Still, I had checked it on the transmission dipstick hot as per the instructions on the stick and seems to be at the right level.

There are probably lab tests for the fluid, similar to engine oil. I guess the metal grit, if it were there, would be microscopic. More like it would just make the fluid oddly shiny.

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #323 on: August 17, 2019, 06:06:15 PM »
I've decided it's time to upgrade the car. There's still a chance we'll keep the old one, not sure just yet.

Old one (2007 Mark V Golf TDI) probably could use a shock absorber replacement but otherwise it's in fine condition considering it's got over 200,000km on the dial. It eats highways for breakfast.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #324 on: August 17, 2019, 06:11:56 PM »
Old one (2007 Mark V Golf TDI) probably could use a shock absorber replacement but otherwise it's in fine condition considering it's got over 200,000km on the dial. It eats highways for breakfast.

I don’t think people who’ve never driven a Mk.V have any idea just what a fabulous car it is. If I could buy a new Mk V today, I totally would.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #325 on: August 17, 2019, 11:07:29 PM »
Old one (2007 Mark V Golf TDI) probably could use a shock absorber replacement but otherwise it's in fine condition considering it's got over 200,000km on the dial. It eats highways for breakfast.

I don’t think people who’ve never driven a Mk.V have any idea just what a fabulous car it is. If I could buy a new Mk V today, I totally would.

Since I had the ECU chip retuned, it's performance has been amazing. Keeping it is an option although I may need to take what I can get for it as a trade in to help bring the price down a bit (and not have the extra registration, insurance and upkeep costs). I doubt I'd get much as a trade.

I'm in the test driving options mode. Due to various reasons it'll be an 4WD SUV style of car. Not my first preferred style of car if it was me only but I'm balancing requirements of my new life (wife + rural living + need to be able to tow trailer up steepish gravel drive). So I figure if I'm not getting say a sports wagon, then I'll make it an more premium model.

Yesterday I drove a VW Tiguan.  I have to say, the performance was rather underwhelming (it was the 132kW model, not the 162kW model). My old Golf has far better pick up.

I've been considering the Touareg as well, that would need to be a late model low km second hand as the new version is well out of price range. Not got to drive one of those yet.

I drove the Skoda Kodiaq a month or so back. I really liked it but they only have the 7 seater model (pop up 3rd row of seats) and not the 5 seat version here, and for me that rules it out. I have absolutely no need to have that space robbed by those seats.

On Friday I drive a Mercedes GLC250, and that was a nice car. A late model low km version of that with some bells and whistles is currently the front runner.

Offline stands2reason

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #326 on: August 29, 2019, 12:38:51 PM »
I have a question regarding evaporative emission control or "gas tank" in general. I'm used to vehicles where there is no pressurized vapor that comes out when you open the filler port. AFAIK, that doesn't mean the gas isn't under pressure in the tank, but that there is a one-way valve or something. The reason I ask is because my vehicle (late 90's Honda) is the kind that does release pressurized vapor when you open it, it even says to expect it on the filler cap, but it also says in the manual that it has evaporation emissions control (charcoal canister).

So, I can understand it takes some amount of pressure to force the gasoline vapor into the charcoal, so there is still a residue when you open it. The actual pressure of the vapor seems limited, even in cases where I refilled a half-tank on a hot day, which means its going into the vapor can where its supposed to. So, I guess it's fine? I am just confused because I thought the two went together. Also, I have heard that such systems sometimes do not last for the life of the vehicle.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #327 on: August 29, 2019, 06:21:44 PM »
I’m not really sure what you’re asking.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline HighPockets

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #328 on: August 30, 2019, 10:13:02 AM »
On my '94 Honda Civic there is an audible 'hiss" when you unscrew the gas cap.  That's the way it's always been since I bought it new. While the whole EEC system is pretty passive it can cause a check engine light if something is not working as expected. but if it's the "hiss" that you hear, that you have concerns about? That's normal on my car, I just open the cap slow, stop when it hisses and then open it the rest of the way when it stops one sec later. 
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: The Car Maintenance and Repair Thread
« Reply #329 on: August 30, 2019, 10:31:17 AM »
No MIL (malfunction indicator lamp) or error codes. It just seems like a contradiction, that it has EEC, except gas vapor comes out when you open it. Basically, I am wondering I don't think more than a certain amount of vapor should come out, if the EEC system is working.

 

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