Author Topic: Snow Throwers  (Read 597 times)

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Offline MTBox

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2017, 02:58:41 PM »
I've got headlight envy; I opted not to have electric start, which removed the additional weight for the battery and the starter. That means mine doesn't have a light, and the neighborhood does not have street lighting, thankfully. Most times, I can clear during the day, but sometimes the driveway to the garage needs a quick run after dark.

Have fun.

Offline Friendly Angel

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2017, 04:00:24 PM »
That thing looks awesome.  I have tire envy.

Indeed.  Those are 16" tires with awesome directional tread;

Have you considered hanging some truck nuts on it?
Amend and resubmit.

Offline seamas

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2017, 04:02:44 PM »
I've never used a snow thrower but have grown more curious about them.

I don't have a terribly long driveway-- just long enough for 3 cars, and only about 8 feet wide.
Lower NY State, so we do get snow.

I am curious about how well snowthrowers work when dealing with all the different snow conditions?  (heavy wet snow, ice, etc)?

Offline DevoutCatalyst

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2017, 04:29:51 PM »
I've never used a snow thrower but have grown more curious about them.

I don't have a terribly long driveway-- just long enough for 3 cars, and only about 8 feet wide.
Lower NY State, so we do get snow.

I am curious about how well snowthrowers work when dealing with all the different snow conditions?  (heavy wet snow, ice, etc)?

Heavy wet snow is why 5 horsepower seems insufficient to me. My machine can't cope. Light snow on a windy day is also a challenge -- a snowblower makes you work that discharge snout moving it to and fro to keep from blowing the snow back where you've been previously and you will get facefuls of blowing powder under wind gusting conditions. Shovels and plows are in some ways better suited tools for the task.

Offline MTBox

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2017, 04:49:35 PM »
A snowthrower is basically a single-stage Paddle-style auger, which also provides the forward motion, or "power shovel." They even have these as Electric. They are great for walkways around the house, but if you have hours and hours of snow, you have to clear more frequently to stay ahead of the accumulation, since you cannot handle as much depth.

Offline seamas

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2017, 05:08:31 PM »
I think with my relatively small amount that I need to shovel (I mean half of it is digging out the cars), that I usually only get 6-10 snowfalls a year and I have two strong/healthy children, my money might be better invested in a generator.

Though circumstances occasionally make it impossible, when I have the ability, I try to do all the shoveling in the evening. That way I don't feel rushed. I take my time, listen to some music and have a nice congac or something while I clear the driveway and walkways.  I realized that the thing I hate most about shoveling snow is the feeling that I have to get it done fast--which will make me overheat (in the cold--not good) or throw out my back.


Offline The Latinist

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2017, 06:07:31 PM »
A snowthrower is basically a single-stage Paddle-style auger, which also provides the forward motion, or "power shovel." They even have these as Electric. They are great for walkways around the house, but if you have hours and hours of snow, you have to clear more frequently to stay ahead of the accumulation, since you cannot handle as much depth.

 Don’t think that’s an accurate distinction.  There are single-, 2-, and 3-stage snow throwers/blowers, and different manufacturers use different terminology to describe all of them.  Ariens, MDT, and Cub Cadet call their machines snow throwers while Toro, Husqvarna and Poulan call theirs blowers.  Honda uses the terms interchangeably, but favors snow blower for all models whether single- or 2-stage.  None of them seems to call single-stage machines “throwers” while calling dual-stage machines “blowers.”
« Last Edit: November 08, 2017, 06:10:16 PM by The Latinist »
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2017, 06:29:06 PM »
I've got headlight envy; I opted not to have electric start, which removed the additional weight for the battery and the starter. That means mine doesn't have a light, and the neighborhood does not have street lighting, thankfully. Most times, I can clear during the day, but sometimes the driveway to the garage needs a quick run after dark.

Very few snow throwers have batteries; mine doesn’t, nor do the Toros with headlights that I looked at..  The electric start is usually accomplished by plugging it into an extension cord.  Headlights on such machines are usually powered by an alternator (sometimes called a stator) which outputs ~12V AC while the engine is running.  Mine can do about 60W or 5A@12V.  Some people wire theirs with LED’s, saying that the built-in halogen lamp is inadequate.  To do that you need to use a bridge rectifier to convert to DC or you’ll get a godawful flicker because the LED will work only in one half of each cycle.


I've never used a snow thrower but have grown more curious about them.

I don't have a terribly long driveway-- just long enough for 3 cars, and only about 8 feet wide.
Lower NY State, so we do get snow.

I am curious about how well snowthrowers work when dealing with all the different snow conditions?  (heavy wet snow, ice, etc)?

My previous snow thrower bogged down when heavy wet snow reached excessive depths, and it’s throw distance was significantly decreased. But it was much smaller and did not have a good self-propulsion system. I expect that my new machine will handle 8-10” of heavy wet snow without problems, throwing it 20+ feet; it should throw lighter dry stuff 40+ feet. But I’ll tell you when I have a chance to try it.  I’ve not dealt with ice, but I think a crusty layer of ice on top of snow it would just devour.  It would be pretty useless on any icy surface; but there sand or salt would be your best bet.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline MTBox

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2017, 10:00:51 PM »
Snow Machine = Snow Mobile = Snow Goer.

Snow Blower = Snow thrower = Snow Machine.

It's often regional.

Googled it for you:
The Basic Differences. The short answer is they are not the same. A "snow thrower" refers to a single stage snow removal machine that picks up the snow in one motion and throws it out the chute with the continuation of that movement. ... A "snow blower" refers to a two stage snow removal machine.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2017, 10:40:33 PM »
As far as I can tell, the quote you pasted here but did not cite comes from an unsigned article on the site of a small, family-owned Michigan power equipment company.  It is nothing more than a single person’s opinion. As I said, I looked at the sites of six major manufacturers of snow throwers, and none of them makes the distinction you do.  None of them.  They all refer to their single and double-stage snow throwers using the same term.  Several use the terms interchangeably.  Perhaps in your tiny corner of the world some sort of distinction is drawn, but it is simply not something that you can use as the basis for telling people what a snow thrower or snow blower “is.”

And your condescension is unnecessary and very much unappreciated.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline Billzbub

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2017, 09:42:50 AM »
Quote from: Steven Novella
gleefully altering one’s beliefs to accommodate new information should be a badge of honor

Offline MTBox

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2017, 05:30:49 PM »
"And your condescension is unnecessary and very much unappreciated."

Whoa. Since that comment is noted along with my input, I assume that is your Inference from some part of something I provided? Even if I were to want to use it, why the heck would this sort of topic involve any condescension? It's about small motorized tools, for goodness sake! I even listed some Synonyms to help point out that things are Regional.

"comes from an unsigned article on the site of a small, family-owned Michigan power equipment company."

Yes, I see you got that point I made = Regional. Then you made some sort of leap. I have no idea what set you off. Sorry. I am better at using words than understanding them, apparently.

You might notice that in my earlier comments I also use the phrase "power shovel" more than once, because that is what we use to describe a single-stage, "propels itself by pulling along its auger" as a "Powered snow Shovel" = snow moving piece of equipment.

Yes, it is a tiny corner of the world, in case you meant that thoughtfully and factually. Well, it's a big corner that is hardly populated. Which happens to get a Sh*t load of snow, often referred to as "the American Alps" or Northern Rocky Mountains. That would be why I felt qualified to participate in this topic and why I first offered some "decoding" clarification for how to Read the model info and translate that into Functional aspects.

Because this discussion is about Tools. Just Tools.
 
« Last Edit: November 09, 2017, 05:36:00 PM by MTBox »

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2017, 07:05:24 PM »
"Googled it for you" is a phrase that cannot be used without condescension.

My problem is not with you talking about your regional dialectical differences.  I love to learn about regional language differences.  I'm a linguist by inclination and by training. My problem is with your stating them as if they are a fact about what a snow-thrower is and is not.  You didn't say, "Fun fact: around here we call a single-stage machine a snow thrower and a 2-stage machine a snow blower."  You said:

Quote
A snowthrower is basically a single-stage Paddle-style auger, which also provides the forward motion, or "power shovel." They even have these as Electric. They are great for walkways around the house, but if you have hours and hours of snow, you have to clear more frequently to stay ahead of the accumulation, since you cannot handle as much depth.

That is not a statement about your regional dialect, it's a statement about what a snow thrower "is."  And it's a wrong one.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline MTBox

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2017, 07:52:54 PM »
""Googled it for you" is a phrase that cannot be used without condescension."

Well, I looked it up, to learn, and to find out what are the differences, and if there are differences, and how those differences are stated. I did't realize I should treat this as a Thesis or dissertation with the references, including the specific URL results, copied into this topic directly. "If you were to Google it, you would find..." etc. I google a lot of things, for lots of reasons. I provide that as a resource, when it has info I didn't know or know how to phrase.

We seem to be digressing over just what the 2nd stage accomplishes.

Is everyone here on pins and needles all the time, and is there some protocol listing I can use for reference, prior to posting? I already got into trouble for Not using Quotes and not nesting them beyond the pale.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Snow Throwers
« Reply #29 on: November 09, 2017, 08:08:02 PM »
I'm not sure we have any disagreement on the purpose of the second stage.  Certainly I have not been discussing it. If you are interested, it is my understanding that the second stage uses an axial impeller (note: not a fan) to throw the snow farther distances than could be achieved with an auger, or screw impeller, alone.  Note that the auger nor impeller neither blows the snow: they act upon the snow as if it were a liquid, accelerating it through physical contact.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell