Author Topic: The DIY Repair Thread  (Read 9075 times)

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Offline xenu

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #135 on: December 07, 2018, 09:46:33 AM »
I have a question
One of my bathrooms is fairly small so having only one pair of outlet is not an issue
I also have a larger bathroom as well and it only have a pair of outlets as well.
Is that normal for larger bathrooms?

I think that in the past this was very normal; bathrooms were not really a hub for technology or small appliances.  But that’s been changing, and If I we’re building a new house I’d want to make sure there were several outlets in each bathroom.

That is a problem with all older homes. My house was built in the 70's and I'm always in need of a wall socket. I have when I have remodeled rooms added outlets. My house also has wall outlets tied in with a wall switch. This was very popular back then. So my rooms have no overhead lights(except were added later) and its set up for floor lamps. This cuts in half the wall outlets that I do have. You mentioned your bathroom and now I'm kicking myself for not adding outlets in my main bathroom when I remodeled.
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Offline brilligtove

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #136 on: December 07, 2018, 08:38:39 PM »
We remodelled our foyer a while back. The result was an outlet positioned behind a new shoe-rack.Over the last few days I moved it from inside the foyer to outside, about 2m away, under the staris that lead up to the front door. The new GFCI outlet is installed and working, powering our Christmas lights.
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Online Desert Fox

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #137 on: January 18, 2019, 06:43:00 AM »
I have a Black and Decker 18 v NiCad powered Drill / screw driver and a lawn trimmer.

Black and Decker appears to have dropped all support for them even though they were touted as universal. Black and decker instead went a 20 v Lithium Ion battery that is not compatible.

You can get aftermarket batteries but we seem to be in a situation where the company expects you to replace all your equipment. I have seen corded drills that are probably 40 or 50 years old and people still use them. I don't see why these NiCad tools cannot be around for decades but I am concerned with aftermarket support drying up.
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Offline Ah.hell

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #138 on: January 18, 2019, 09:41:16 AM »
I have a Black and Decker 18 v NiCad powered Drill / screw driver and a lawn trimmer.

Black and Decker appears to have dropped all support for them even though they were touted as universal. Black and decker instead went a 20 v Lithium Ion battery that is not compatible.

You can get aftermarket batteries but we seem to be in a situation where the company expects you to replace all your equipment. I have seen corded drills that are probably 40 or 50 years old and people still use them. I don't see why these NiCad tools cannot be around for decades but I am concerned with aftermarket support drying up.
On the upside, I got my perfectly servicable 18v drill for free.

Offline CarbShark

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #139 on: January 18, 2019, 11:29:03 AM »
You can take apart the batteries if they go bad and replace the component batteries with much cheaper off the shelf versions. There are YouTube’s showing you how.


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Online The Latinist

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #140 on: January 18, 2019, 11:31:24 AM »
One of the problems is that lithium ion batteries are so clearly superior to NiCd batteries for this purpose that all manufacturers have rapidly switched to the technology and eliminated their NiCd offerings. And there simply isn't any money in maintaining an infrastructure to support obsolete tech.  It's kind of like VHS and DVD that way.

I'm in the same position, with older 18V NiCd tools for which OEM batteries are no longer available.  My plan is to replace them with new Milwaukee 12V Li-ion ones.
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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #141 on: January 19, 2019, 06:15:00 AM »
I have a Black and Decker 18 v NiCad powered Drill / screw driver and a lawn trimmer.

Black and Decker appears to have dropped all support for them even though they were touted as universal. Black and decker instead went a 20 v Lithium Ion battery that is not compatible.

You can get aftermarket batteries but we seem to be in a situation where the company expects you to replace all your equipment. I have seen corded drills that are probably 40 or 50 years old and people still use them. I don't see why these NiCad tools cannot be around for decades but I am concerned with aftermarket support drying up.
On the upside, I got my perfectly servicable 18v drill for free.

I was given a free 14 V drill myself in addition to the 18 v ones I already have but none of the batteries I was given will hold a charge.  Ordered an aftermarket off of eBay. I ordered a new charger as well and it came with a 14 v that does hold a charge but best to have at least 2. 
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #142 on: May 18, 2019, 04:46:31 PM »
As my wife was taking her shower yesterday water started pouring out of the wall around the shower arm. I reached up and pulled it out of the wall. The threads had completely broken off. So today I bought a new shower arm, and replace the old one. It took a bit to get the threads out of the nipple, but there saw a small burr that I was able to grab with a pair of needle-nose pliers.  New one first snugly.  Now I have to make sure everything gets dried out.
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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #143 on: May 19, 2019, 02:27:07 PM »
Pulled the lawn mower out of winter storage, fueled it up, pulled the cord and...nothing.  For perspective, this mower has never failed to start by the second pull before.  Checked the spark plug, and it was relatively clean.  Checked the air filter: a bit dirty, but serviceable.  Choke moves, throttle moves, auto-choke mechanism moving freely. Sprayed some starting fluid in the throat of the carb: starts.  Inside of carb dry as a bone; come to think of it, so was the spark plug even after tons of pulling.  Fuel problem it is.

Removed float bowl, cleaned. Tested float: functional. That leaves the carburetor, likely the intakes. Examined float bowl screw: clogged. Cleaned.  Reassembled.  Still nothing. Damn, I hate cleaning carbs. On a whim, check the float bowl screw again: clogged again.  Wtf?  Must’ve been some grit left in the bowl. Cleaned bowl and screw again, reassembled. Started on second pull.  Hurray!

What’s that smell of gas? It’s streaming from the float bowl. Left off the float screw washer.  Replaced.  Now, I can finally mow my lawn.

After lunch.
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Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #144 on: May 19, 2019, 05:10:55 PM »
I have a ride on mower. Zero turn style. I have a few acres to mow.

The limits of my maintenance skills are replacing and/or cleaning the air filter and the mower blades. I did also replace the battery and managed to get the cutting drive pulley belt back on after it was dislodged by a branch I ran over and must have just flicked up at just the right angle to get in and dislodge the pulley belt.

Offline brilligtove

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #145 on: May 19, 2019, 10:41:59 PM »
Pulled the lawn mower out of winter storage, fueled it up, pulled the cord and...nothing.  For perspective, this mower has never failed to start by the second pull before.  Checked the spark plug, and it was relatively clean.  Checked the air filter: a bit dirty, but serviceable.  Choke moves, throttle moves, auto-choke mechanism moving freely. Sprayed some starting fluid in the throat of the carb: starts.  Inside of carb dry as a bone; come to think of it, so was the spark plug even after tons of pulling.  Fuel problem it is.

Removed float bowl, cleaned. Tested float: functional. That leaves the carburetor, likely the intakes. Examined float bowl screw: clogged. Cleaned.  Reassembled.  Still nothing. Damn, I hate cleaning carbs. On a whim, check the float bowl screw again: clogged again.  Wtf?  Must’ve been some grit left in the bowl. Cleaned bowl and screw again, reassembled. Started on second pull.  Hurray!

What’s that smell of gas? It’s streaming from the float bowl. Left off the float screw washer.  Replaced.  Now, I can finally mow my lawn.

After lunch.

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #146 on: May 19, 2019, 11:57:59 PM »
Mowed about 80% of the lawn, including all of the parts visible to others.  Then I ran over a stick I just such a way that it bent the front baffle into the path of the blade. Now I have to decide whether to try to straighten it or replace it.  I’m leaning toward replace.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good mulching lawnmower blade?  I’ve not been satisfied with the factory blade on this machine, and after the trauma it received today I’m thinking of replacing it.
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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #147 on: May 24, 2019, 09:37:23 PM »
So I took a closer look at the lawnmower to assess the damage.  Turns out that it’s not just the baffle; when the baffle bent, it hit the axle—which bent.  And the axle is sold as fart of the transmission assembly.  So I’m looking at a parts order of nearly $100.  If I couldn’t replace this myself, I think the mower would be totaled.

I wish I had bought a Snapper commercial mower.  It would have cost about twice as much, but I think I’d have been much happier with it. I’ve been regretting this purchase ever since I made it.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline BAWRFRS

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #148 on: May 29, 2019, 08:12:46 AM »
OK, here are a few mower stories.

A year or two ago my old self-propelled, walk-behind mower finally became so worn out that it wasn't economic to fix it. Needing my lawn cut soon and wanting some time to decide what to get next, I decided to "go green" and buy a reel mower for temporary use. I figured it would be paid for (vs. hiring) in 2-3 cuts, and if I liked it, I'd just keep it. I sort of always wanted one and, after reading how much air pollution is due to gas mowers, had romanticized its use as a means to do my part to reduce my carbon footprint.

Well, it was an interesting experience. It's not as silent as it appears on videos, but it is much quieter, of course. One must adjust the blades such that they neatly cut paper like Fiskar scissors. It did work OK, but it always left a some blades or stalks uncut. Basically anything that falls outside a certain height range, or that is angled in a certain way, gets missed, so you end up with this lawn that is approximately 99% cut with 1% randomly spaced taller stray bits. In short, it doesn't look good. You either have to go back with a string trimmer to get the missed pieces or you quickly decide on your next mower. Which I did (first the former, then the latter).

Having borrowed a neighbor's un-propelled gas mower, I was amazed at how much lighter it was, so after having many self-propelled mowers, I went with a simpler, lighter push mower. Yes, I had to push it myself, but I found that effort-wise,  the lighter weight really does make up for the lack of drive wheel, on average. It uses less gas too, so that's a win.

Last story: the discharge chute. The particular mower I have (which appears to share parts with a number of brands) has a discharge chute that is, IMO, too easy to dislodge when bumping up against something like a tree or rock. I usu. just put it back on and move along. Last time this happened, I tilted the front end of the mower upwards to make it easier to pull it back and away from the obstacle. However as I did so the dislodged discharge chute went under the deck, and, naturally, chagrin ensued. Fortunately it was only a $9 part, but I'll definitely have to be more careful.

That said, the mower has a Honda engine, and it has been much easier to get started than my previous mowers. I now understand why those engines command a premium. [the mower is not a Honda, though]

The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.  - Bertrand Russell

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #149 on: May 29, 2019, 02:19:34 PM »
If you are trying to go green - How about an electric mower ?
My parents had one years ago that plugged in but I think most are battery today.
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