Author Topic: The DIY Repair Thread  (Read 10113 times)

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Offline Billzbub

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2017, 04:29:33 PM »
The CD/DVD drive of my Xbox One stopped working recently.  The internet had a hack where you just tip the Xbox up so gravity would pull the disk in farther, but it didn't work.  The internet also had a video of how to take an Xbox One apart.  I took the case apart with the intent of investigating what was wrong with the CD/DVD drive, but I accidentally tore the ribbon cable in half that connects the front face of the Xbox to the rest of it.  I can still turn it on and off using a controller, but now the button on the front doesn't work anymore.   :'(
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2017, 08:33:07 PM »
One thing I’ve sadly never learned to do is solder well enough to replace components on PCBs.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #17 on: November 09, 2017, 01:22:31 PM »
One thing I’ve sadly never learned to do is solder well enough to replace components on PCBs.

Hey, if I can do it, anyone can. Flux is important, otherwise the solder won't stick, and getting the surface hot enough and being clean enough is important.
Daniel
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2017, 01:38:40 PM »
I imagine I could; but I've never had sufficient need to justify the investment of time.

There are other skills I wish I had, too: I'd like to be able to weld, for instance.

BTW: The new shift actuator for my washer has been delivered.  Based on this transaction, I can highly recommend Parts Dr at http://www.partsdr.com/.  I ordered this part Tuesday evening, paid for two day shipping and received it this morning. They also had an online chat function which allowed me to confer with a customer service agent about shipping options even after hours. Oh, and the part cost about 30% less than many other sites, making the cost of expedited shipping easier to swallow.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Online Desert Fox

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #19 on: November 09, 2017, 02:43:06 PM »
Why I repaired my dryer, all my parts came from eBay. Probably except for auto parts with a lifetime warranty, almost all my repair parts come from eBay. I am usually willing to wait a day or two extra as well.

One item that sucked was that when my eldest brother died, I inherited a .22 target pistol from him. Would not function right and I found a few parts were damaged and/or worn. Cannot really get firearm parts on eBay, maybe some but not much. I took a guess and replaced a couple of parts. Found out that I needed to replace a couple of more parts. They were small parts, one about the size of the insides of a spring loaded ink pen (almost looks like it too) and another the size of the tab on a soda can. The parts were also pretty cheap but the shipping and handling on two orders makes me really wish I had just ordered everything the first time.

"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2017, 03:07:45 PM »
With two adults and two children all needing clothes on a regular basis, a few extra bucks to get it before Monday was well worth it.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline junki

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #21 on: November 10, 2017, 10:26:05 AM »
Way too hot soldering tip is in my experience very common problem too. I've found a combination that works well enough for me: simple Velleman 50W iron with a pencil tip, el-cheapo lighting dimmer plug to adjust the heat and old-style tin/lead/resin solder. With the dimmer it's fine from AWG 4 wire to last-century SMD.

Some local DIY stores only stack less toxic tin/copper solder now. IMO, it's less pleasant to work with.
Remember ventilation. For 30 years, I didn't. Now the smallest of soldering jobs without an open window gives headache.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #22 on: November 10, 2017, 10:46:32 PM »
Success!  Washing machine just successfully completed a full cycle after replacing the shift actuator. Total cost of repair: $50.89, of which $14.99 was 2-day shipping.  I hate to think how much it would have cost to have a Whirlpool repair technician come out.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Online Desert Fox

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #23 on: November 11, 2017, 12:04:44 AM »
I am amazed at how often basic random replacing of parts is cheaper, even when you have to replace multiple parts, than to call a technician.
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
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Offline MTBox

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #24 on: November 11, 2017, 02:49:22 PM »
It's nearly always cheaper to do the work yourself, as long as it does not involve specialty tools you don't want to buy, and you have the work space. You don't have the overhead that the technician is trying to cover, either. Then again, there are some things I will never do myself, again. This includes Remove/Rebuild/Replace a truck transmission and sewing an Upright bass bag (foam padded and flannel lined, full zipper and cordura outer cover).

Online Desert Fox

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #25 on: November 11, 2017, 05:23:55 PM »
It's nearly always cheaper to do the work yourself, as long as it does not involve specialty tools you don't want to buy, and you have the work space. You don't have the overhead that the technician is trying to cover, either. Then again, there are some things I will never do myself, again. This includes Remove/Rebuild/Replace a truck transmission and sewing an Upright bass bag (foam padded and flannel lined, full zipper and cordura outer cover).

It is more that you can end up replacing far more parts than required and still come out way ahead than when you get a technician to work on something. I think I have been lied to by them too many times or just them being less knowledgeable than I am. Ran into that with a number of computer repairs.
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

Online John Albert

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #26 on: November 12, 2017, 01:04:14 AM »
Sometimes the manufacturers price certain parts so prohibitively on the open market that it's not even worth it to repair the unit yourself. 

A few years ago I had a dishwasher break down. The previous owner had neglected a bent door hinge which caused a serious misalignment problem with the front door of the unit, which in turn caused the door latch/power safety mechanism to break. Repairing the problem meant replacing two parts, a door hinge assembly and a latch/switch assembly. After several hours of searching online, I discovered that those were some of the most expensive parts for that particular model, and altogether would add up to several hundred dollars. Seriously, the hinge assembly was over $150 and the door handle/latch/switch was over $200.

I ended up just buying a whole new dishwasher.

Offline daniel1948

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #27 on: November 12, 2017, 09:17:57 AM »
It's nearly always cheaper to do the work yourself, as long as it does not involve specialty tools you don't want to buy, and you have the work space. You don't have the overhead that the technician is trying to cover, either. Then again, there are some things I will never do myself, again. This includes Remove/Rebuild/Replace a truck transmission and sewing an Upright bass bag (foam padded and flannel lined, full zipper and cordura outer cover).

It is more that you can end up replacing far more parts than required and still come out way ahead than when you get a technician to work on something. I think I have been lied to by them too many times or just them being less knowledgeable than I am. Ran into that with a number of computer repairs.

I don't have the skills to repair appliances, cars, etc. I bought my first iMac long before there was an Apple store here. I bought it at an independent (i.e. non-Apple) Mac store. When it was just out of warranty, the Ethernet failed. I took it in to the Mac store for repair and was informed that on the iMac, the Ethernet is on the logic board (Apple-speak for the motherboard) and that the repair would entail replacing the entire board, at a cost about $200 less than buying a new iMac.) Faced with the unpleasant thought of buying a whole new computer, I did some research and found a small dongle for (I don't remember exactly) $30 or $40 that plugs into a USB port and makes an Ethernet connection. It worked flawlessly and just as fast as the original Ethernet and never gave me another problem until I decided to upgrade the computer about 6 years later.

The folks at the Mac store either didn't know about the USB to Ethernet dongle, or declined to tell me because they hoped to con me into buying a new computer. A year or two after that the store went out of business. And a couple of years after that the Apple store opened in Spokane.
Daniel
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #28 on: November 12, 2017, 09:34:40 AM »
Daniel: I bet you underestimate yourself.  The skills required to repair my washing machine were the ability to use Google, to read and follow directions, and to use a 1/4” socket (a wrench also would have worked) and a Phillips screwdriver.
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Offline MTBox

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Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #29 on: November 12, 2017, 01:38:04 PM »
Hasn't Apple been notoriously stingy about providing "consumer access" to their internal parts? I thought that was part of their intent. Wasn't there some thing about not even being able to change a battery in an iPhone without causing damage?

We had a little HP Notebook, one of the first with the screen swivel-lay flat formats; the WiFi antenna was in the screen surround. There was a class action lawsuit for these, and you were supposed to get replacement coupons. I had already put a USB-WiFi Dongle on it, and have used that an old XP system, too. I still have it. That's part of DIY; find what works, then make it fit.

We had a Gaggia espresso maker with switches that often failed. They would send the switch for free; I got to where I could pop off the front, strip the electronics, change the switch, and reassemble in about 10 minutes. It also got tiresome, after the 4th or 5th time.

Our water is so hard that it dissolves faucets and valves over time. I buy Moen: "buy it for looks, buy it for life." They send free parts, and eventually, the entire faucet is new (like that Johnny Cash song about building a Cadillac in pieces over the years). After the third kitchen replacement, I bought a different model, to update the look; they only ship you what you already own. I can "field strip" a faucet in 2 minutes.

But, at some point, new makes sense.

 

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