Author Topic: The DIY Repair Thread  (Read 10524 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #165 on: June 24, 2019, 09:11:38 PM »
Public Service Announcement: clean the drip pan under your grill.  Mine caught fire today and was like a torch through the grill.  I shall be sure to keep a better eye on it from now on.

Upside: I got to try out baking soda in a grease fire.  It was like magic. And despite the fact that the lingering CO2 generation made it impossible to restart the grill, the fire had heated everything so hot that even after wiping off the baking soda with a wet paper towel I was able to grill my burgers just with the residual heat.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline CarbShark

  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 12286
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #166 on: June 24, 2019, 10:51:50 PM »
Public Service Announcement: clean the drip pan under your grill.  Mine caught fire today and was like a torch through the grill.  I shall be sure to keep a better eye on it from now on.

Upside: I got to try out baking soda in a grease fire.  It was like magic. And despite the fact that the lingering CO2 generation made it impossible to restart the grill, the fire had heated everything so hot that even after wiping off the baking soda with a wet paper towel I was able to grill my burgers just with the residual heat.

And a related shopping tip, when you buy an outdoor grill make sure the drip pan is removable.
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #167 on: July 07, 2019, 07:23:52 PM »
In regard to my chainsaw (the hand-me-down I got from my father-in-law last year and chronicled troubleshooting), I never did get the carb adjusted quite right, and I had a hell of a time adjusting the carb this spring, so I broke down and brought it to a local shop. Glad to say all my repairs were good; all that was needed was someone who knew what he was doing to adjust the carb. I just paid for the half-hour minimum labor charge.

In regard to my stripped starter cover screw, I repaired it before taking it to the shop as I had previously mentioned planning: with a sheet metal screw and some super glue.  It’s now firmly in place and pulling smoothly again. Not sure how it’ll fare if I ever need to remove it, but that might not happen for years.

Used the saw tonight to cut down some much-hated rhododendra . Worked great.

ETA: by the way, the Echo power trimmer I rebuilt last year started up right away this spring and has been working flawlessly.

Oh, and the Milwaukee M12 Fuel tools are excellent.  I used them to build a ramp for an injured dog, and they worked great. 3” screws through 3/4” plywood and 2x4 pine with no problems  I’d recommend them to anyone.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2019, 07:51:59 PM by The Latinist »
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline Desert Fox

  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 19515
  • Hopeful Non-Theist
    • Kitsune's Web Page
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #168 on: July 08, 2019, 02:30:15 AM »
Glad you had good luck with a repair shop - I have had a lot of bad experience where I have been lied to in order to add additional repairs / costs.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 03:09:25 AM by Desert Fox »
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #169 on: July 08, 2019, 02:44:40 AM »
Grad you had good luck with a repair shop - I have had a lot of bat experience where I have been lied to in order to add additional repairs / costs.

I find a few simple precautions help: I always set a limit beyond which they need to call for authorization (in this case $50), and I ask for removed parts back on the work order. I also do my research before choosing a shop, and I usually start a new shop off with something where I already know the issue (in this case, it was pretty clear that it was a carb adjustment).

I also think it helps to choose a shop that charges a reasonable (i.e., not absurdly low) labor rate, as it lessens the incentive to replace parts unnecessarily.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 02:46:43 AM by The Latinist »
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline Desert Fox

  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 19515
  • Hopeful Non-Theist
    • Kitsune's Web Page
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #170 on: July 08, 2019, 03:12:32 AM »
Grad you had good luck with a repair shop - I have had a lot of bat experience where I have been lied to in order to add additional repairs / costs.

I find a few simple precautions help: I always set a limit beyond which they need to call for authorization (in this case $50), and I ask for removed parts back on the work order. I also do my research before choosing a shop, and I usually start a new shop off with something where I already know the issue (in this case, it was pretty clear that it was a carb adjustment).

I also think it helps to choose a shop that charges a reasonable (i.e., not absurdly low) labor rate, as it lessens the incentive to replace parts unnecessarily.

Next time I have any sort of repair, I will think about your suggestions.
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #171 on: July 29, 2019, 04:50:10 PM »
Lawnmower hasn’t been running well and last time I used it it was backfiring.  When I went to start it last night it just wouldn’t start. It only caught once and then just for a fraction of a second.  Removed the spark plug and there was clearly fuel in the cylinder.  Had my wife pull the starter and saw no sign of spark. Bought a new NGK plug for $2.96 at NAPA today and it started up on the second pull.  Still running a little rough, though, so I’m wondering if I got ahold of some bad fuel. Will check the fuel filter when I gets. Chance, too.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #172 on: July 29, 2019, 09:12:29 PM »
Okay, so it quickly became apparent that the problems weren’t gone. Running rough, and making a horrible rattle.  Did some research and figured it might be a sheared flywheel key from the original debris strike that broke my axle.  Took off the cowling and engine cover and removed the clutch and cup: sure enough:



That rectangular piece of aluminum is half of the flywheel key, and should be attached to the other half in the notch in the crank shaft. That explains my backfiring and rough running (the key ensures proper timing) as well as the rattle. Now I need to hat hold of a new key and figure out whether I can remove the thing without buying a special flywheel puller tool.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline Desert Fox

  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 19515
  • Hopeful Non-Theist
    • Kitsune's Web Page
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #173 on: July 29, 2019, 09:15:28 PM »
If I can ask, is it less money to fix than it would be to replace at this stage?
As well, are there are other costs you need to start considering?
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #174 on: July 30, 2019, 08:07:14 AM »
If I can ask, is it less money to fix than it would be to replace at this stage?
As well, are there are other costs you need to start considering?

Well, the part costs about $1. There’s my time, but I’m on summer vacation now. The machine’s only three years old, and I’ve fixed the major stuff so there are sunk costs...
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline BilLumberg

  • Not Enough Spare Time
  • **
  • Posts: 161
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #175 on: July 30, 2019, 10:21:15 AM »
Harbor freight has a decent bolt type puller set for $15.

https://www.harborfreight.com/bolt-type-wheel-puller-set-62620.html

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #176 on: July 30, 2019, 10:54:38 AM »
Harbor freight has a decent bolt type puller set for $15.

https://www.harborfreight.com/bolt-type-wheel-puller-set-62620.html

Thanks, but I already got it off using a trick I learned from YouTube. Cleaned it up with some steel wool and sandpaper where the broken key had slightly deformed it.  Now I just need to get the part from the local dealer, borrow a torque wrench so I don’t crack the flywheel by over-torquing, and put everything back together.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline Desert Fox

  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 19515
  • Hopeful Non-Theist
    • Kitsune's Web Page
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #177 on: July 30, 2019, 02:09:48 PM »
Harbor freight has a decent bolt type puller set for $15.

https://www.harborfreight.com/bolt-type-wheel-puller-set-62620.html

Thanks, but I already got it off using a trick I learned from YouTube. Cleaned it up with some steel wool and sandpaper where the broken key had slightly deformed it.  Now I just need to get the part from the local dealer, borrow a torque wrench so I don’t crack the flywheel by over-torquing, and put everything back together.

That brings up a question - I can get a torque wrench on eBay for ~$25. Is it worth it?
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

Offline The Latinist

  • Cyber Greasemonkey
  • Technical Administrator
  • Reef Tank Owner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8139
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #178 on: July 30, 2019, 04:19:49 PM »
A torque wrench would give me peace of mind when tightening things.  My father in law has one, and it’s good to know I’m not going to break anything, especially when screwing something into an engine block, etc.

I put everything back together this afternoon.  Didn’t borrow a torque wrench—I guesstimated it. I also took off the blade-drive assembly (incorporating blade adapter and drive pulley).  The adapter had been slightly bent in the wreck, so I straightened it along with another piece.  Reassembled everything and started it up.  Started on the first pull and it’s purring again.

I had never had the flywheel off of a small engine like this.  It’s very fascinating, with the embedded magnets that drive the magneto as it turns, perfectly tuning the spark with the stroke of the piston.  A simple but very effective method. No wonder It was backfiring and underpowered, with the spark delayed as it was.  And to be honest I’d always vaguely wondered where the electricity for the spark came from but never bothered to find out. This is another reason I like to fix things myself: I almost always learn something, which compensates me for my time.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2019, 04:22:28 PM by The Latinist »
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

Offline Desert Fox

  • Poster of Extraordinary Magnitude
  • **********
  • Posts: 19515
  • Hopeful Non-Theist
    • Kitsune's Web Page
Re: The DIY Repair Thread
« Reply #179 on: July 30, 2019, 04:49:42 PM »
I have done a couple of recent car repair where I basically put parts back and just  made sure that I was not pretending to be She-Ra. :)
"Give me the storm and tempest of thought and action, rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will; but first let me eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge."
— Robert G. Ingersoll

 

personate-rain
personate-rain