Author Topic: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg  (Read 4468 times)

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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #120 on: August 29, 2019, 08:29:42 PM »
I think I have the same issue and it gets worse as I get older.

But I don’t think it’s lactose for me. Cream has very little lactose.

I was having digestion issues that gradually became worse. I tried an elimination protocol and as soon as I stopped drinking coffee the issue went away. So I knew it was the coffee or the cream. I added cream back and the issue returned immediately. Stopped all cream and had coffee again and the issue went away again.

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Well, cream does contain lactose.  Around 3%, about the same as whole milk. 

Cream wouldn’t normally cause problems for a lactose intolerant person, unless they were drinking a lot of cream.  Most people would be consuming little cream in coffee.

I can probably tolerate one cup of coffee with cream, but no more.  For sure, lattes and cappucinos are out.  I started to become lactose intolerant 30 years ago, and it has become progressively worse.

Quote
When humans first started herding cows for milk, and by definition were lactose intolerant, they wouldn’t have had problems since they’d be only drinking the equivalent of a glass of milk a day.

Says who?  If I drink a glass of milk in the morning, I'm crippled with gas and bloating for the rest of the day.

Note to fellow lactose intolerants: Lactase pills (branded "Lactaid" in the US) are pretty effective.

Says Johannes Krause and Thomas Trappe in ‚die Reise unserer Gene.  Eine Geschichte über uns und unsere Vorfahren.‘

Dann labern sie nur Scheiße (meiner Meinung nach).

Not necessarily.  When humans first started herding cattle for milk, adult human diets contained no lactose.  Their bowel bacteria wouldn’t have been able to metabolise the lactose.  Lactase splits lactose, so that the galactose and glucose can be absorbed in the small intestine.  If the lactose isn’t split, and isn’t metabolised by bowel bacteria in the large intestine, then the lactose would have little effect.

When adults started to drink milk, the bacteria able to metabolise lactose gained a selective advantage.  And lactase producing adults gained an advantage compared to non-lactase producers.


I know all that.  I was arguing with the claim that a glass of milk a day would not have been a problem for lactose-intolerant ancestors.  It's an order of magnitude more milk than I can tolerate.

Just because you can’t tolerate 20 ml of milk (which would be an order of magnitude less than a glass of milk of around 200 ml), does not mean that everyone with lactose intolerance wouldn’t be able to tolerate 20 ml of milk.  Or that the early pastoralists wouldn’t have been able to tolerate similar volumes of milk.  Or even greater volumes of milk.
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #121 on: August 29, 2019, 08:35:33 PM »
I think I have the same issue and it gets worse as I get older.

But I don’t think it’s lactose for me. Cream has very little lactose.

I was having digestion issues that gradually became worse. I tried an elimination protocol and as soon as I stopped drinking coffee the issue went away. So I knew it was the coffee or the cream. I added cream back and the issue returned immediately. Stopped all cream and had coffee again and the issue went away again.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Well, cream does contain lactose.  Around 3%, about the same as whole milk. 

Cream wouldn’t normally cause problems for a lactose intolerant person, unless they were drinking a lot of cream.  Most people would be consuming little cream in coffee.

I can probably tolerate one cup of coffee with cream, but no more.  For sure, lattes and cappucinos are out.  I started to become lactose intolerant 30 years ago, and it has become progressively worse.

Quote
When humans first started herding cows for milk, and by definition were lactose intolerant, they wouldn’t have had problems since they’d be only drinking the equivalent of a glass of milk a day.

Says who?  If I drink a glass of milk in the morning, I'm crippled with gas and bloating for the rest of the day.

Note to fellow lactose intolerants: Lactase pills (branded "Lactaid" in the US) are pretty effective.

Says Johannes Krause and Thomas Trappe in ‚die Reise unserer Gene.  Eine Geschichte über uns und unsere Vorfahren.‘

Dann labern sie nur Scheiße (meiner Meinung nach).

Not necessarily.  When humans first started herding cattle for milk, adult human diets contained no lactose.  Their bowel bacteria wouldn’t have been able to metabolise the lactose.  Lactase splits lactose, so that the galactose and glucose can be absorbed in the small intestine.  If the lactose isn’t split, and isn’t metabolised by bowel bacteria in the large intestine, then the lactose would have little effect.

When adults started to drink milk, the bacteria able to metabolise lactose gained a selective advantage.  And lactase producing adults gained an advantage compared to non-lactase producers.


I know all that.  I was arguing with the claim that a glass of milk a day would not have been a problem for lactose-intolerant ancestors.  It's an order of magnitude more milk than I can tolerate.

The enzyme that allows for adults to digest lactose is only present in a portion of the human population. (Mostly the areas where cattle were first domesticated).

The geographic distribution of lactose malabsorption:

https://marlin-prod.literatumonline.com/cms/attachment/4d4a380a-ddf6-4273-87fc-f491e6379c45/gr2.jpg
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