Author Topic: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg  (Read 5774 times)

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Online bachfiend

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #120 on: August 29, 2019, 08:29:42 PM »
I think I have the same issue and it gets worse as I get older.

But I don’t think it’s lactose for me. Cream has very little lactose.

I was having digestion issues that gradually became worse. I tried an elimination protocol and as soon as I stopped drinking coffee the issue went away. So I knew it was the coffee or the cream. I added cream back and the issue returned immediately. Stopped all cream and had coffee again and the issue went away again.

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Well, cream does contain lactose.  Around 3%, about the same as whole milk. 

Cream wouldn’t normally cause problems for a lactose intolerant person, unless they were drinking a lot of cream.  Most people would be consuming little cream in coffee.

I can probably tolerate one cup of coffee with cream, but no more.  For sure, lattes and cappucinos are out.  I started to become lactose intolerant 30 years ago, and it has become progressively worse.

Quote
When humans first started herding cows for milk, and by definition were lactose intolerant, they wouldn’t have had problems since they’d be only drinking the equivalent of a glass of milk a day.

Says who?  If I drink a glass of milk in the morning, I'm crippled with gas and bloating for the rest of the day.

Note to fellow lactose intolerants: Lactase pills (branded "Lactaid" in the US) are pretty effective.

Says Johannes Krause and Thomas Trappe in ‚die Reise unserer Gene.  Eine Geschichte über uns und unsere Vorfahren.‘

Dann labern sie nur Scheiße (meiner Meinung nach).

Not necessarily.  When humans first started herding cattle for milk, adult human diets contained no lactose.  Their bowel bacteria wouldn’t have been able to metabolise the lactose.  Lactase splits lactose, so that the galactose and glucose can be absorbed in the small intestine.  If the lactose isn’t split, and isn’t metabolised by bowel bacteria in the large intestine, then the lactose would have little effect.

When adults started to drink milk, the bacteria able to metabolise lactose gained a selective advantage.  And lactase producing adults gained an advantage compared to non-lactase producers.


I know all that.  I was arguing with the claim that a glass of milk a day would not have been a problem for lactose-intolerant ancestors.  It's an order of magnitude more milk than I can tolerate.

Just because you can’t tolerate 20 ml of milk (which would be an order of magnitude less than a glass of milk of around 200 ml), does not mean that everyone with lactose intolerance wouldn’t be able to tolerate 20 ml of milk.  Or that the early pastoralists wouldn’t have been able to tolerate similar volumes of milk.  Or even greater volumes of milk.
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Online bachfiend

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #121 on: August 29, 2019, 08:35:33 PM »
I think I have the same issue and it gets worse as I get older.

But I don’t think it’s lactose for me. Cream has very little lactose.

I was having digestion issues that gradually became worse. I tried an elimination protocol and as soon as I stopped drinking coffee the issue went away. So I knew it was the coffee or the cream. I added cream back and the issue returned immediately. Stopped all cream and had coffee again and the issue went away again.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Well, cream does contain lactose.  Around 3%, about the same as whole milk. 

Cream wouldn’t normally cause problems for a lactose intolerant person, unless they were drinking a lot of cream.  Most people would be consuming little cream in coffee.

I can probably tolerate one cup of coffee with cream, but no more.  For sure, lattes and cappucinos are out.  I started to become lactose intolerant 30 years ago, and it has become progressively worse.

Quote
When humans first started herding cows for milk, and by definition were lactose intolerant, they wouldn’t have had problems since they’d be only drinking the equivalent of a glass of milk a day.

Says who?  If I drink a glass of milk in the morning, I'm crippled with gas and bloating for the rest of the day.

Note to fellow lactose intolerants: Lactase pills (branded "Lactaid" in the US) are pretty effective.

Says Johannes Krause and Thomas Trappe in ‚die Reise unserer Gene.  Eine Geschichte über uns und unsere Vorfahren.‘

Dann labern sie nur Scheiße (meiner Meinung nach).

Not necessarily.  When humans first started herding cattle for milk, adult human diets contained no lactose.  Their bowel bacteria wouldn’t have been able to metabolise the lactose.  Lactase splits lactose, so that the galactose and glucose can be absorbed in the small intestine.  If the lactose isn’t split, and isn’t metabolised by bowel bacteria in the large intestine, then the lactose would have little effect.

When adults started to drink milk, the bacteria able to metabolise lactose gained a selective advantage.  And lactase producing adults gained an advantage compared to non-lactase producers.


I know all that.  I was arguing with the claim that a glass of milk a day would not have been a problem for lactose-intolerant ancestors.  It's an order of magnitude more milk than I can tolerate.

The enzyme that allows for adults to digest lactose is only present in a portion of the human population. (Mostly the areas where cattle were first domesticated).

The geographic distribution of lactose malabsorption:

https://marlin-prod.literatumonline.com/cms/attachment/4d4a380a-ddf6-4273-87fc-f491e6379c45/gr2.jpg
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Offline John Albert

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #122 on: September 18, 2019, 03:33:20 AM »

Offline John Albert

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #123 on: October 01, 2019, 07:47:04 AM »

Offline John Albert

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #124 on: October 02, 2019, 06:12:27 AM »

Offline stands2reason

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #125 on: October 04, 2019, 12:25:01 PM »


https://www.cpr.org/2019/09/25/colorado-now-has-eight-cases-of-vape-illness-polis-says-the-state-is-looking-for-a-fix/

Quote
Department of Public Health and Environment to see what it can do. 

A wave of the illness associated with e-cigarettes has swept the nation, causing more than 500 cases in 38 states and 11 reported deaths. There are now eight cases of confirmed or probable vaping-related illness in the state, according to the state health department.  Six of those patients have been hospitalized.

Polis said other possible measures, like Tobacco-21 -- raising the legal purchase age for e-cigarette products from 18 to 21 -- would require legislative approval. A ballot measure to raise taxes on vaping products would need voter approval. A proposal for lawmakers to refer a hefty tax increase on nicotine and tobacco to the ballot failed in Colorado’s General Assembly last spring.

Governors in other states have issued sweeping orders, such as a four-month ban on the sale of all vaping products in Massachusetts, or a ban on flavored e-cigarettes in Michigan.

Polis says, unlike some other states, Colorado law limits what he can do under his direction.

“There’s things that other states’ governors have done that are not in my authority to do,” he said. He said the state will explore what’s within its legal authority to do.   

More than 500 cities and counties in 30 states, including 10 local governments in Colorado, have raised the legal age to purchase vaping product to 21.  Eighteen states have done the same.

“It’s not something the governor can do, but if it’s something legislators want to work on, we’re happy to work with them on that concept,” Polis said.

Polis made clear he supports “closing the vaping loophole,” which exempts vape products from a tobacco tax. He said bringing the tax proposal back is “something we haven’t given up on. We’re hoping to pursue it.”

Colorado topped the nation for teen vaping in a survey of more than three dozen states last year.

Of the cases of vape-related illness in Colorado since August, two involved just marijuana, three were nicotine only and two involved both nicotine and marijuana.  One is still under investigation. Three of the cases were in Denver, two in Boulder and one each in Arapahoe, Jefferson and Weld counties. The median age of the cases is 18. 

Cigarettes Rule Everything Around Me  >:D

Offline John Albert

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #126 on: October 04, 2019, 02:57:48 PM »
Vape products should be subject to the same taxes as any other nicotine products. And they should all be subjected to safety testing before being allowed on the market.

Offline xenu

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #127 on: October 04, 2019, 06:04:51 PM »
Saw this article from the Mayo clinic on vaping.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/ct-vaping-mayo-clinic-toxic-inhalation-20191003-4yn4aw7el5blffjtqxjnxg3bdu-story.html 

Quote
New Mayo Clinic research suggests that the nation’s outbreak of vaping-related lung injuries is due to people inhaling toxic substances — akin to workers who breathe fumes from chemical spills, or World War I soldiers exposed to mustard gas.
The finding by Mayo’s pathology lab in Arizona is based on the first-ever examination of 17 biopsies of patients with vaping-associated lung injuries. While the role of chemical inhalation might sound obvious, Dr. Brandon Larsen, a surgical pathologist at Mayo Clinic Arizona, said the finding is important because it contradicts a popular theory that these cases were due to oil or lipid contamination in the lungs.


“It seems to be some kind of direct chemical injury, similar to what one might see with exposures to toxic chemical fumes, poisonous gases and toxic agents,” said Larsen, who reported the findings Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

While the 17 biopsies found macrophages — white blood cells that are dispatched to eat harmful contaminants — they found no presence of large deposits of oil or lipids (a kind of fatty organic compound) in the lungs.
 
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Offline John Albert

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #128 on: October 04, 2019, 06:57:52 PM »
Who knows what the small-time manufacturers are putting in those oils.

Offline John Albert

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #129 on: October 05, 2019, 09:36:30 AM »

Offline stands2reason

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #130 on: October 07, 2019, 04:12:57 PM »

Offline John Albert

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #131 on: October 09, 2019, 08:38:53 AM »

Offline werecow

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #132 on: October 09, 2019, 10:17:05 AM »
If I just sell four of my lungs, I'll never have to work another day of my life!
Mooohn!

Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #133 on: October 09, 2019, 03:48:02 PM »
If I just sell four of my lungs

I'm sure with creative modern financial systems it'll be possible to do that. I can see lung futures market being a thing... To ultimately collapse (the market that is, not the lungs) as disruptive technology enters the fray.

Offline HighPockets

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Re: Health, Fitness, Nutrition, and Medicine.jpg
« Reply #134 on: October 09, 2019, 05:38:32 PM »
If I just sell four of my lungs, I'll never have to work another day of my life!

Too bad they don't have a price for stomachs.
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