Author Topic: Episode #662  (Read 8709 times)

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Online daniel1948

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Re: Episode #662
« Reply #120 on: March 25, 2018, 07:46:44 PM »
I said you were trying to come up with an insult. I didn’t say you’ve succeeded.


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I was not trying to insult you.  I was just stating a fact.
Right, but you refrained from stating the “fact” because someone else had written a book using the word. But still you got to call me irrational and obsessive.

At least be honest.




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CarbShark, noting that you have carbophobia, a irrational and obsessive counting of carbohydrates, doesn’t mean that you’re irrational or obsessive.

And as I’ve noted many times, if you’ve had success reducing your weight and keeping it off on your low carbohydrate/low fat ketogenic diet, then congratulations.  There’s a wide range of perfectly acceptable diets, but no one diet that suits everyone.

I’ve had considerable success over 30+ years on a high carbohydrate/low fat diet in going from 85+ kg to 64 kg.  An anecdote perhaps, but so is you recommendation for a high fat/low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.  You wouldn’t be saying - I didn’t lose any weight on a high fat/low carbohydrate ketogenic diet, but ** (insert studies here) have shown that it works ** (insert whatever results they show).

OK, I'm out. You want to have an honest conversation jump over to one of the several diet and nutrition threads. I'm done here.

CarbShark,

Good.  You’re the doctrinaire one here.  I don’t recommend any diet as the best one, as you persistently do.  I don’t argue with anyone who has success with one diet or another, insisting that my diet is the best one.

In the current episode of SGU, in the discussion of why meat eating isn’t sustainable, Steven Novella mentioned that he’s managed to lose weight.  Just by reducing portion size.



Not to mention his insistence that Dr. Novella and the AHA and the Mayo clinic and my own doctor do not understand nutrition, implying that either they are ignoring the evidence or are incapable of understanding it.
Daniel
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“You say you love your children above all else, and yet you are stealing their future in front of their very eyes.”
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Offline Marc in NA

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Re: Popular science books for the laymen
« Reply #121 on: March 26, 2018, 12:04:29 PM »
When discussing Stephen Hawkins death, the panelist talked about how Hawkins book "A Brief History of Time" was notable for its ability to describe very a very complicated subject in a way that made it appealing to a layman's audience. But I would disagree that this was a landmark book in that sense, even though it might be the best seller of its type. Hawkins did not break new ground here, as the panelists repeatedly tried to suggest. There have been many good science books written by top scientists in the past that were intended for the general public and that were very well-written. I think we are giving the impression that Hawkins did something groundbreaking, when he is just one in a long line of scientists who wrote well for the public.

Albert Einstein introduced the laymen to the theory of relativity with his short book "Relativity: The Special and General Theory". Catchy title, no? I actually have this book on my Kindle and one day I intend to read it.

The theoretical physicist and cosmologist George Gamow wrote a series of wonderful books explaining everything from modern cosmology to modern mathematics to how science works. I still remember his quirky little books from when I was in high school. Neil deGrasse Tyson  said Gamow's "One Two Three... Infinity: Facts and Speculations of Science" was a big influence on his interest in presenting science to the public.

Isaac Asimov, you already know about him.

Julian Huxley was a prolific and very popular writer in the first half of the 1900s who did more than anyone at the time to present Darwin's theories to the public.

etc.

Hawkins' book may have sold more copies and his book (which I actually did read) was well-written. But let's not suggest that he was doing something new and unprecedented. He was preceded by a hefty list of science authors who were every bit as readable and interesting as Hawkins.

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Re: Popular science books for the laymen
« Reply #122 on: March 26, 2018, 01:08:41 PM »
When discussing Stephen Hawkins death, the panelist talked about how Hawkins book "A Brief History of Time" was notable for its ability to describe very a very complicated subject in a way that made it appealing to a layman's audience. But I would disagree that this was a landmark book in that sense, even though it might be the best seller of its type. Hawkins did not break new ground here, as the panelists repeatedly tried to suggest. There have been many good science books written by top scientists in the past that were intended for the general public and that were very well-written. I think we are giving the impression that Hawkins did something groundbreaking, when he is just one in a long line of scientists who wrote well for the public.

Albert Einstein introduced the laymen to the theory of relativity with his short book "Relativity: The Special and General Theory". Catchy title, no? I actually have this book on my Kindle and one day I intend to read it.

The theoretical physicist and cosmologist George Gamow wrote a series of wonderful books explaining everything from modern cosmology to modern mathematics to how science works. I still remember his quirky little books from when I was in high school. Neil deGrasse Tyson  said Gamow's "One Two Three... Infinity: Facts and Speculations of Science" was a big influence on his interest in presenting science to the public.

Isaac Asimov, you already know about him.

Julian Huxley was a prolific and very popular writer in the first half of the 1900s who did more than anyone at the time to present Darwin's theories to the public.

etc.

Hawkins' book may have sold more copies and his book (which I actually did read) was well-written. But let's not suggest that he was doing something new and unprecedented. He was preceded by a hefty list of science authors who were every bit as readable and interesting as Hawkins.

Probably the best science communicator of the modern era (or any era) was Richard Feynman


The Feynman Lectures on Physics Website

Quote
The Feynman Lectures on Physics is perhaps the most popular physics book ever written. It has been printed in a dozen languages. More than 1.5 million copies have sold in English, and probably even more in foreign language editions (the number of copies printed in Russian alone, for example, is estimated to be over 1 million). The Feynman Lectures on Physics have endured for over 40 years, and they have influenced thousands of people. This page is dedicated to people who want to share how The Feynman Lectures on Physics has affected their lives.
and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

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Re: Popular science books for the laymen
« Reply #123 on: March 26, 2018, 02:02:58 PM »
When discussing Stephen Hawkins Hawking's death, the panelist talked about how Hawkins Hawking's book "A Brief History of Time" was notable for its ability to describe very a very complicated subject in a way that made it appealing to a layman's audience.

This book came out when I was studying modern physics in college, and I don't think I would've grasped much of it without that background... I'd be surprised if most "laymen" got the full effect.
Amend and resubmit.

Offline DaKine Oregon

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Re: Episode #662 Daylight Saving Time
« Reply #124 on: March 29, 2018, 01:41:19 PM »
An old Indian Chief, upon having had Daylight Saving Time explained to him, replied "Only a white man would think he could cut the bottom off a blanket, sew onto the top, and end up with a longer blanket." :D

Online daniel1948

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Re: Episode #662
« Reply #125 on: March 29, 2018, 06:16:47 PM »
An old Indian Chief, upon having had Daylight Saving Time explained to him, replied "Only a white man would think he could cut the bottom off a blanket, sew onto the top, and end up with a longer blanket." :D

I wish I could give this ten Likes. I guess I can. Wonderful story!

Like like like like like like like like like like.
Daniel
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #662
« Reply #126 on: March 31, 2018, 07:51:41 PM »
I want to learn vector calc just so I can understand the Feynman Lectures.
I would like to propose...that...it is undesirable to believe in a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. — Bertrand Russell

 

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