Author Topic: Episode #677  (Read 15449 times)

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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #60 on: July 11, 2018, 08:56:03 PM »
Yeah, that's one reason why it's the better option. But it's slow to be universally adopted so in the meantime America should use the more common DD-MM-YYYY.

Incidentally, and here's an interesting factoid, the arrangement works in spoken language as well. Americans will generally tend to say "July fourth" or "December twelfth". Australians like me would say "Fourth of July" or "Twelfth of December". Which I also think is more logical. The more you know.
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Offline stands2reason

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #61 on: July 11, 2018, 09:06:25 PM »
Yeah, that's one reason why it's the better option. But it's slow to be universally adopted so in the meantime America should use the more common DD-MM-YYYY.

Incidentally, and here's an interesting factoid, the arrangement works in spoken language as well. Americans will generally tend to say "July fourth" or "December twelfth". Australians like me would say "Fourth of July" or "Twelfth of December". Which I also think is more logical. The more you know.

1941-12-07, a datestamp which will live in infamy...

Or, 1776-07-04. Admittedly does look weird.

Online CarbShark

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #62 on: July 11, 2018, 10:13:26 PM »
Yeah, that's one reason why it's the better option. But it's slow to be universally adopted so in the meantime America should use the more common DD-MM-YYYY.

Incidentally, and here's an interesting factoid, the arrangement works in spoken language as well. Americans will generally tend to say "July fourth" or "December twelfth". Australians like me would say "Fourth of July" or "Twelfth of December". Which I also think is more logical. The more you know.

1941-12-07, a datestamp which will live in infamy...

Or, 1776-07-04. Admittedly does look weird.

Yup. I think you hit it right on the head. People abbreviated dates they way they speak (and think) dates. Without regard to computer sorting (that's a fairly recent development.

People either say December 7, 1941 or the fourth of July, 1776.

And so they abbreviate it the same way
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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #63 on: July 11, 2018, 11:04:19 PM »
Yeah, that's one reason why it's the better option. But it's slow to be universally adopted so in the meantime America should use the more common DD-MM-YYYY.

Incidentally, and here's an interesting factoid, the arrangement works in spoken language as well. Americans will generally tend to say "July fourth" or "December twelfth". Australians like me would say "Fourth of July" or "Twelfth of December". Which I also think is more logical. The more you know.

1941-12-07, a datestamp which will live in infamy...

Or, 1776-07-04. Admittedly does look weird.

Yup. I think you hit it right on the head. People abbreviated dates they way they speak (and think) dates. Without regard to computer sorting (that's a fairly recent development.

People either say December 7, 1941 or the fourth of July, 1776.

And so they abbreviate it the same way

But in which direction does the chain of causality go? Do they say dates because of the way they're written, or do they write dates because of the way they're said?
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Offline Quetzalcoatl

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #64 on: July 17, 2018, 05:26:29 PM »
Personally I don't get bothered by the America-centrism of the hosts. They are American, they live in America and are immersed in American culture. It's okay for them to approach things from an American viewpoint. They do at least make an effort - and a good one - to be international, and I appreciate that, because it's something that a lot of American podcasts don't bother with.

I agree with this. I think it is really good that they try to be a podcast for skeptics worldwide, rather than only for American skeptics.

From what I recall of the listeners statistics they have mentioned over the years, 55% of listeners are in the US, and per capita, Australia is the country with most listeners.

I had also noted that the dating of the earliest podcast episodes are different than the later ones.
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #65 on: July 17, 2018, 05:38:50 PM »
As an amateur genealogist, I have been burned on several occasions by dates in XX/XX/XX format.  I therefore exclusively use the date format 17 Jul 2017, using leading zero on the day where appropriate.
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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #66 on: July 17, 2018, 05:42:21 PM »
As an amateur genealogist, I have been burned on several occasions by dates in XX/XX/XX format.  I therefore exclusively use the date format 17 Jul 2017, using leading zero on the day where appropriate.

I was a yeoman in boot camp and we had to write the dates like that.  Makes sorting in a spreadsheet cumbersome though.
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #67 on: July 17, 2018, 05:52:49 PM »
As an amateur genealogist, I have been burned on several occasions by dates in XX/XX/XX format.  I therefore exclusively use the date format 17 Jul 2017, using leading zero on the day where appropriate.

I was a yeoman in boot camp and we had to write the dates like that.  Makes sorting in a spreadsheet cumbersome though.

If you've configured the date format for the field correctly, it should work.  And I use genealogy software that supports the format, so that makes it even easier.  What I'm most concerned about is unambiguity in print.
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Offline gebobs

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #68 on: July 18, 2018, 01:24:39 PM »
If you've configured the date format for the field correctly, it should work.

Good point. You can sort any date format you want chronologically.

Offline missymocha

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Re: Episode #677
« Reply #69 on: July 20, 2018, 02:03:39 PM »
Even BRCA1 and 2 testing is not unambiguous.  Many people will have variants in a gene that may or may not affect protein function.  These are called variants of unknown significance (VUS).  If the variant causes the protein to be truncated or shortened, or deletes a big chunk of the protein there is a pretty good chance that it will affect protein function.  Or if we have data that shows that many people with this variant have developed cancer at an early age, we can assume that it probably increases risk.  However, many variants change an amino acid but we have no way of knowing if this affects protein function.  What do you do with this information?  Even if you have a family history of cancer, you don't know if its because of this variant or some other variant in another gene. 

Aside from this problem, how much do you want to trust a for profit company, whose profit model is based in large part on selling your DNA and health information, with your information?  They ask all those health and family history questions because the DNA information without that is not very useful for them to sell.  You can supposedly opt out of them selling them your information, but who is policing that?  do you trust them?  How safe is your data?  What is the potential harm vs benefit.

As for the ancestry stuff, what does it tell you about yourself if you are part whatever?  Does it define or determine  your personality? Your physical appearance? your talents?  We all came from the same ancestors if you go back far enough.  As Steve mentioned, using the SNPs that define the current inhabitants of a country doesn't tell you about the people who lived there ages ago. 

 

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