Author Topic: Episode #681  (Read 2982 times)

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Offline cgervasi

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    • Charles J Gervasi
Episode #681 -In Search of
« Reply #30 on: August 08, 2018, 12:14:26 AM »
In the segment about the new In Search of, you talked about how network executives say people want want sensationalism and woo, but when there is something higher quality people will watch it.  I agree with this.

I think we have a problem in media today in that content providers can get great feedback at what gets attention, what people click on, what stops them from channels surfing.  We're geared to stop and look at morbid fascination at train wrecks.  That is not the same as wanting to see more train wrecks.  The feedback loop doesn't distinguish.  It's easy for executives to conclude that people say that want substantive content but actually click on lurid content.  They're right.  It doesn't mean they want lurid content.   It's as if a mapping app noticed that we slow down and gawk at an accident, and it responded by routing on on a path to take us by more wrecks. 

Offline daniel1948

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Re: Episode #681
« Reply #31 on: August 20, 2018, 04:25:49 PM »
I had a friend who claimed to be able to prove that God exists. When pressed, she reluctantly told me her "proof." It turned out to be a variant of the Drake equation, where her arbitrary choice of constants gave such an extremely low probability of life that there had to have been a God to make it happen. She was not happy with my response that with slightly different constants her own argument gave the result that life was inevitable and God was unnecessary.

My own belief is that technological civilizations are so short-lived that we'll never contact them, and will probably never find evidence of them. I would love it if we did, and I think SETI should continue looking. But if we did hear a signal and sent a response, there'd probably be nobody there to hear it when it arrived. Of course, my belief in the shortness of civilizations is based on the single observation that we seem hell-bent on destroying our own.
Daniel
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"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think long and hard before starting a war."
-- Otto von Bismarck

 

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