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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #60 on: March 04, 2019, 08:54:08 PM »
Yeah, don't use Excel on a Mac if you don't have to. Macs are renowned to be exemplars of the principle that Apple products work very well with other Apple products, and very badly with non-Apple products.

I'd suggest LibreOffice, which is supposed to be fully compatible with Excel, but I've found that there are sometimes some inconsistencies with formatting which can ruin a carefully-set up spreadsheet.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2019, 08:56:53 PM by arthwollipot »
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Offline Beef Wellington

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #61 on: March 04, 2019, 08:58:23 PM »
Now that I'm doing more on my Mac than on the PC, the one thing that irks me most is the version of Excel I have on the Mac. It's not a patch on the Windows version.

I've looked into an upgrade, and I'd be hoping it's much better than the 2011 Excel for Mac I currently have.

Have you tried in OpenOffice Calc?
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Offline The Latinist

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #62 on: March 05, 2019, 08:46:52 AM »
I've never had any problems with Excel on my Mac.  Of course I'm not trying to use complicated spreadsheets created by someone else, nor am I trying to use VisualBasic scripts.
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Offline CarbShark

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #63 on: March 05, 2019, 10:17:01 AM »
You may have to tweak your VB scripts but they should work. The tweaks would be any calls outside of Office. Same with macros.

If your VB does a lot of interapplication stuff you may need to learn AppleScript to make it work.


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Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #64 on: March 07, 2019, 02:44:23 AM »
OK, so my Samsung 1TB SSD arrived as did the 2.5" to 3.5" case to fit it into the drive bay of my old desktop. First thing I find is the PC does not recognise the drive if I am using the 3.5" conversion case. Sees it just fine if plugged in directly to the SSD. Ugh. Not sure on the solution for that just yet.

Undeterred I get on with cloning the old drive to the new as I can plug the sata cable directly into the new drive.

I use Macrium Reflect for the cloning job. Of course I punch through too fast and do the clone only to realise afterwards I needed to set up the cloning a little differently for it to use the entire capacity of the new drive. oops. Start again and this time do the set up right.

Then shut down, unplug the old drive and fire the beast up. It starts Windows 10, I get the blue logo and the spinning dots for a bit but then the screen just goes dark and I've no idea if it hangs, needs a shite load more time or what. My previous experience with clones is they fire up immediately. So I go into troubleshooting mode, Google, Macrium forums and other places. Ugh all too hard.

Someone said they had same problem and used EaseUS instead and that worked for them. Like Macrium it's supposed to have a free version for cloning. SO I go through the process of download and install. But no you get the the critical part of the process and it refuses to continue unless you pay for a license. I've no problem with purchasing software but this was advertised as free, so mildly annoyed I abandon EaseUS.

I go looking for more info. I then discover than Samsung have their own cloning software for just this purpose. So i download that, install and run it. It was easy to use, pretty fast and it worked! The machine sprang to life immediately and it was obviously much quicker, more responsive.

Only issue is the video licenses for the training software I have it seems are tied to a drive's serial ID, so I'll have to talk with the company about transferring those over.

So the machine works fine from a software POV but I still have to solve the drive bay problem. I'll go back to the supplier to see what's going on with that.

Offline Beef Wellington

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #65 on: March 07, 2019, 01:01:22 PM »
OK, so my Samsung 1TB SSD arrived as did the 2.5" to 3.5" case to fit it into the drive bay of my old desktop. First thing I find is the PC does not recognise the drive if I am using the 3.5" conversion case. Sees it just fine if plugged in directly to the SSD. Ugh. Not sure on the solution for that just yet.

Undeterred I get on with cloning the old drive to the new as I can plug the sata cable directly into the new drive.

I use Macrium Reflect for the cloning job. Of course I punch through too fast and do the clone only to realise afterwards I needed to set up the cloning a little differently for it to use the entire capacity of the new drive. oops. Start again and this time do the set up right.

Then shut down, unplug the old drive and fire the beast up. It starts Windows 10, I get the blue logo and the spinning dots for a bit but then the screen just goes dark and I've no idea if it hangs, needs a shite load more time or what. My previous experience with clones is they fire up immediately. So I go into troubleshooting mode, Google, Macrium forums and other places. Ugh all too hard.

Someone said they had same problem and used EaseUS instead and that worked for them. Like Macrium it's supposed to have a free version for cloning. SO I go through the process of download and install. But no you get the the critical part of the process and it refuses to continue unless you pay for a license. I've no problem with purchasing software but this was advertised as free, so mildly annoyed I abandon EaseUS.

I go looking for more info. I then discover than Samsung have their own cloning software for just this purpose. So i download that, install and run it. It was easy to use, pretty fast and it worked! The machine sprang to life immediately and it was obviously much quicker, more responsive.

Only issue is the video licenses for the training software I have it seems are tied to a drive's serial ID, so I'll have to talk with the company about transferring those over.

So the machine works fine from a software POV but I still have to solve the drive bay problem. I'll go back to the supplier to see what's going on with that.

One upside to SSD's is no moving parts, so you don't even have to secure it like you would a hard drive. As long as it's connected properly, just tape it to whatever is closest and you won't have any problems (just don't block any airflow). That Samsung Data Migration utility rocks. They also use a program called Samsung Magician (Windows only) that does firmware updates, speed tests, S.M.A.R.T. data and manual TRIM on older operating systems (I use it to trim my Samsung 750 EVO in my Vista machine). The last version that I liked was Magician 4.97, ver 5 just looks terrible and I can't find most of the features I use in the older one. It also has a feature called R.A.P.I.D. mode that sets a side a gig or 2 of your system ram as a permanent cache to open commonly used programs faster, but as solid-state is pretty fast on its own I doubt most users will notice a difference. The 1TB SSD I bought for my Macbook is a SanDisk since the price was lower and Magician won't run in macOS, but I highly recommend Magician since you're on Windows.
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Offline Captain Video

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #66 on: March 07, 2019, 01:21:56 PM »
I Just added 16GB of RAM and cloned a drive to SSD on a friends 2011 macbook. I used Super Duper and cloned externally to a Samsung 250GB SSD using a USB cradle. It went slow because of the older USB and took about an hour. I tested a boot using the cradle with no problems then exchanged the drives. Smooth process start to finish with the clone.

Once I opened it up I "remembered" I needed a Torx screwdriver and didn't have one but I was able to remove the mounting nubbies with a pair of pliers.

The machine now runs much faster

I got him a cradle to replace the dvd dive with another hard drive but he opted to wait.
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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #67 on: March 07, 2019, 02:30:25 PM »
On my old Acer, which I am keeping as a backup, I replaced the DVD rom as well with a hard drive. It gets used a hell of a lot more. With my Asus gaming laptop however, it has two bays for hard drives and a separate DVD rom bay. When I get a day off, I plan to replace with a Blu Ray I bought.
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Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #68 on: March 07, 2019, 10:32:52 PM »
One upside to SSD's is no moving parts, so you don't even have to secure it like you would a hard drive. As long as it's connected properly, just tape it to whatever is closest and you won't have any problems (just don't block any airflow). That Samsung Data Migration utility rocks. They also use a program called Samsung Magician (Windows only) that does firmware updates, speed tests, S.M.A.R.T. data and manual TRIM on older operating systems (I use it to trim my Samsung 750 EVO in my Vista machine). The last version that I liked was Magician 4.97, ver 5 just looks terrible and I can't find most of the features I use in the older one. It also has a feature called R.A.P.I.D. mode that sets a side a gig or 2 of your system ram as a permanent cache to open commonly used programs faster, but as solid-state is pretty fast on its own I doubt most users will notice a difference. The 1TB SSD I bought for my Macbook is a SanDisk since the price was lower and Magician won't run in macOS, but I highly recommend Magician since you're on Windows.

I used Samsung Magician this morning.

So I spent a fair chunk of the morning in an online chat with the tech support guy at RAM City where I got the drive carrier from. Tried pretty much everything, even an attempt to change my SSD from IDE to AHCI. When I got into my BIOS to make the drive change, I did not have an option for AHCI, only for IDE and RAID. I went with RAID.

Performance was a little quicker than IDE (up from ~250MB/s to 280MB/s) but it still didn't solve the issue with the drive carrier. So I've given up on that. I found an old 3.5" bracket and screwed the SSD into that and it slides into the spare drive bay reasonably snugly and I think it'll be fine. I could pop a bit of velcro sticky tape in there but I don't think it's needed.

It's not a super fast drive but I don't need it to be super fast - the PC is old and it performs like lightening compared to before. Boots up so quickly! :)

The other thing I learned is the SATA connections are numbered, and I needed to swap over the cable plugged into the SATA 0 connection from the old drive to the new one so it would choose the new drive to boot from. All simple and old hat to many I guess but we learn new stuff each time. Mine PC has 3 of them, one was spare, now I have all of them in use as the other one connects the optical drive.

I guess I have a spare driver carrier, no idea if it simply isn't compatible with my PC or it has a circuit board fault. As a $30 experiment, it's not hugely painful. Be nice if it worked though.

All that's left is to see if I can have the training video licenses transferred to the new drive.

I had done the SSD clone swap in my 2011 Macbook Pro a couple of years ago. It was pretty painless.

Offline The Latinist

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #69 on: March 07, 2019, 11:37:44 PM »
My mom has a laptop with a spare drive bay.  I’ve been meaning to buy her an SSD to serve as a boot drive and convert her HDD to storage.  I imagine she’ll be quite amazed by the transformation.
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Offline Beef Wellington

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #70 on: March 08, 2019, 02:04:04 AM »
One upside to SSD's is no moving parts, so you don't even have to secure it like you would a hard drive. As long as it's connected properly, just tape it to whatever is closest and you won't have any problems (just don't block any airflow). That Samsung Data Migration utility rocks. They also use a program called Samsung Magician (Windows only) that does firmware updates, speed tests, S.M.A.R.T. data and manual TRIM on older operating systems (I use it to trim my Samsung 750 EVO in my Vista machine). The last version that I liked was Magician 4.97, ver 5 just looks terrible and I can't find most of the features I use in the older one. It also has a feature called R.A.P.I.D. mode that sets a side a gig or 2 of your system ram as a permanent cache to open commonly used programs faster, but as solid-state is pretty fast on its own I doubt most users will notice a difference. The 1TB SSD I bought for my Macbook is a SanDisk since the price was lower and Magician won't run in macOS, but I highly recommend Magician since you're on Windows.

I used Samsung Magician this morning.

So I spent a fair chunk of the morning in an online chat with the tech support guy at RAM City where I got the drive carrier from. Tried pretty much everything, even an attempt to change my SSD from IDE to AHCI. When I got into my BIOS to make the drive change, I did not have an option for AHCI, only for IDE and RAID. I went with RAID.

Performance was a little quicker than IDE (up from ~250MB/s to 280MB/s) but it still didn't solve the issue with the drive carrier. So I've given up on that. I found an old 3.5" bracket and screwed the SSD into that and it slides into the spare drive bay reasonably snugly and I think it'll be fine. I could pop a bit of velcro sticky tape in there but I don't think it's needed.

It's not a super fast drive but I don't need it to be super fast - the PC is old and it performs like lightening compared to before. Boots up so quickly! :)

The other thing I learned is the SATA connections are numbered, and I needed to swap over the cable plugged into the SATA 0 connection from the old drive to the new one so it would choose the new drive to boot from. All simple and old hat to many I guess but we learn new stuff each time. Mine PC has 3 of them, one was spare, now I have all of them in use as the other one connects the optical drive.

I guess I have a spare driver carrier, no idea if it simply isn't compatible with my PC or it has a circuit board fault. As a $30 experiment, it's not hugely painful. Be nice if it worked though.

All that's left is to see if I can have the training video licenses transferred to the new drive.

I had done the SSD clone swap in my 2011 Macbook Pro a couple of years ago. It was pretty painless.

A few years back I saved another computer from my company's e-cycle pile, this one was an old Core 2 Lenovo. I gave it to a friend who needed a PC for his basement workshop area. I maxed the RAM out for him and he put an SSD in. He couldn't get AHCI to show up in the BIOS until he fiddled with the "legacy" options. I would assume a tech support call that long would mention that, but who knows. RAID is meant for a RAID setup, ie more than one drive in a mirrored or striped config. If it work for you, great, but I would try again to get AHCI enabled. One reason for not getting the full SATA3 500 MB/s is your computer might be old enough to only support SATA2. The Vista machine I mentioned previously only has SATA1 and Magician's speed test rarely breaks 100 MB/s but it's still much faster than the old HDD. Regardless of what the config you ended up with, it sounds like it's better than what you started with :)
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Offline Alex Simmons

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #71 on: March 08, 2019, 05:06:52 AM »
A few years back I saved another computer from my company's e-cycle pile, this one was an old Core 2 Lenovo. I gave it to a friend who needed a PC for his basement workshop area. I maxed the RAM out for him and he put an SSD in. He couldn't get AHCI to show up in the BIOS until he fiddled with the "legacy" options.

Not sure what they are but I'll do some research.


I would assume a tech support call that long would mention that, but who knows.

Well I did the BIOS stuff after the call ended so we didn't get to discuss my RAID finding.


RAID is meant for a RAID setup, ie more than one drive in a mirrored or striped config. If it work for you, great, but I would try again to get AHCI enabled. One reason for not getting the full SATA3 500 MB/s is your computer might be old enough to only support SATA2. The Vista machine I mentioned previously only has SATA1 and Magician's speed test rarely breaks 100 MB/s but it's still much faster than the old HDD. Regardless of what the config you ended up with, it sounds like it's better than what you started with :)

This is an old ex-govt department PC I picked up for ~$100 many years ago. I'm pretty sure it had XP on it originally. I'm just crap at throwing such stuff out.

So it's quite possible I can't get AHCI at all. No idea to be honest. I did some looking about on HP forum and found a thread where it seems someone else discovered there was no AHCI option.

No matter, it's working fine.

Offline werecow

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #72 on: April 04, 2019, 07:21:19 PM »
Starting to itch for a major system upgrade. My last one was in 2014. I recently upgraded my projector and bought a UHD BD drive (burner, though I'll use it mostly for movies). But now I'll need a new graphics card to play the content I want to play (my current one doesn't work for VR and can't even really handle 4k video playback), and tbh I'd like something more powerful anyway.

I'm definitely aiming for a great all-round PC setup that can do gaming, VR, data science and neural network computations, and good video and decent audio. I think my first step will be to upgrade my GTX780 video card to this 2080TI. Next I'll replace the motherboard, memory (I'm thinking 64GB DDR4), and CPU, cooler (must be ultra quiet; thinking of going with scythe mugen again or something similar), and then finally I'll buy an M.2 drive, maybe even two, as system drives. Not sure what motherboard to go for, though. As for processor, I think I want to go with an intel i9 but I'm still undecided on whether to go for a socket 2066 or 1151 processor. The 2066 are more powerful but they cost a ton. Still, I'm starting to lean that way. But I do have a large number of peripheral devices, so I'll need plenty of USB lanes. Finally, I have a massive amount of storage devices (10 HDDs, 2 SSDs, and 3 BR readers, though I don't need all of the latter), so I want a large number of SATA or SAS connections. If the mobo doesn't have those I'll have to buy an expansion slot. And one of my big HDD's needs replacing anyway, so I'll upgrade that to a 14TB drive.

So, punching in the approximate numbers, that'll cost me about... wait. No, that can't be right. Carry the two...

Ahem.

*Cough*

Never mind.
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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #73 on: April 04, 2019, 07:36:42 PM »
Getting video cards with that much better performance than the GTX 780 is going to be pretty pricey right there. 
For example, one of the less expensive ones, the RTX 2070 appears to be around $500.
Interestingly, it is actually a lower powered card though than the GTX 780.

Been recently watching video cards a bit an upgrade my HD 7850 for a GTX 970.
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Offline superdave

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Re: Computer Repair and Upgrade Thread
« Reply #74 on: April 04, 2019, 07:36:54 PM »
not sure if this counts but I accidentally dropped my phone in the toilet ... washed it out in rubbing alcohol and kept it in a bag full of rice and other desiccants, and 3 days later it came back to life.
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