Author Topic: Episode #684  (Read 3744 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Steven Novella

  • SGU Panel Member
  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1842
    • http://www.theskepticsguide.org
Episode #684
« on: August 18, 2018, 12:02:11 PM »
What's the Word: Phenomenology
News Items: Dunning Kruger Anti-vaccine Edition, Alien Abduction Stories, Smallpox Drug, Roundup Verdict, Schwarzite
Who's That Noisy
Your Questions and E-mails: Arable Land
Science or Fiction
Steven Novella
Host, The Skeptics Guide
snovella@theness.com

Offline PabloHoney

  • Off to a Start
  • *
  • Posts: 82
  • How many pits are in a pear?
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2018, 03:25:12 PM »
That Monsanto case...what a crock, folks.
Punitive damages!

I've got punitive damages to report over here, due to silicone breast implants going the way of the dodo as a result of these kinds of frivolous lawsuits.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 03:27:32 PM by PabloHoney »

Offline God Bomb

  • Seasoned Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 504
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2018, 08:49:29 PM »
Now I know what the episode of the simpsons "The Simpsons files" was referencing (other than the X-files)

(after Homer tells marge he saw aliens while fishing)

Marge Simpson: Have you been drinking?

Homer: No! Well, ten beers.

also...
Chief Wiggum: Your story is very compelling, Mr. Jackass, um, Simpson. Let me just type it up on my invisible typewriter.

I also got science or fiction wrong.  I figured the exo-planets we are able to see are mostly un-earth-like, either orbiting very close to their suns, or gas giants, therefore would be of different composition...I guess the rocky planets are generally made of the same stuff regardless of their size and distance from the star.

Fell deeds awake. Now for wrath, now for ruin, and the red dawn.

Offline lonely moa

  • A rather tough old bird.
  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 4979
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2018, 10:08:18 PM »
Just two syllables in hectare(s).

I love hearing discussions on farming between people basically ignorant of the subject.  Glyphosate didn't replace more dangerous herbicides. 

Arable farmers in  my area raise store lambs on winter break crops, there are three thousand outside my house finishing the oats sown directly after wheat harvest.  Saves soil nutrients, degradation and makes good profit from the meat.  Is it arable? Yes.  Is it grazing?  Yes.

NZ produces enough food for forty million people... that's 34 million more than live here. Seems like a tiny couple of mountainous islands is doing it's share, even though we produce a lot of certified organic product.  Mind you, we have our problems with water pollution and diminishing native biodiversity, but at least ur regulatory agencies don't dismiss the problems out of hand...

http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/news/article.cfm?mnarticle_uuid=710BF05A-D444-DED2-F8BF-2A76298460E0

Permanent pasture with deep rooting herbs will save the world.  Sequester carbon, provide high quality protein, and use minimal water, and fossil fuel.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 11:50:29 PM by lonely moa »
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline bachfiend

  • Not Any Kind of Moderator
  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1910
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2018, 12:31:23 AM »
Just two syllables in hectare(s).

I love hearing discussions on farming between people basically ignorant of the subject.  Glyphosate didn't replace more dangerous herbicides. 

Arable farmers in  my area raise store lambs on winter break crops, there are three thousand outside my house finishing the oats sown directly after wheat harvest.  Saves soil nutrients, degradation and makes good profit from the meat.  Is it arable? Yes.  Is it grazing?  Yes.

NZ produces enough food for forty million people... that's 34 million more than live here. Seems like a tiny couple of mountainous islands is doing it's share, even though we produce a lot of certified organic product.  Mind you, we have our problems with water pollution and diminishing native biodiversity, but at least ur regulatory agencies don't dismiss the problems out of hand...

http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/news/article.cfm?mnarticle_uuid=710BF05A-D444-DED2-F8BF-2A76298460E0

Permanent pasture with deep rooting herbs will save the world.  Sequester carbon, provide high quality protein, and use minimal water, and fossil fuel.

And the inevitable excreta of the lambs also fertilises the soil.  So it’s a win-win.
Gebt ihr ihr ihr Buch zurück?

Offline lonely moa

  • A rather tough old bird.
  • Stopped Going Outside
  • *******
  • Posts: 4979
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2018, 01:41:37 AM »
Just two syllables in hectare(s).

I love hearing discussions on farming between people basically ignorant of the subject.  Glyphosate didn't replace more dangerous herbicides. 

Arable farmers in  my area raise store lambs on winter break crops, there are three thousand outside my house finishing the oats sown directly after wheat harvest.  Saves soil nutrients, degradation and makes good profit from the meat.  Is it arable? Yes.  Is it grazing?  Yes.

NZ produces enough food for forty million people... that's 34 million more than live here. Seems like a tiny couple of mountainous islands is doing it's share, even though we produce a lot of certified organic product.  Mind you, we have our problems with water pollution and diminishing native biodiversity, but at least ur regulatory agencies don't dismiss the problems out of hand...

http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/news/article.cfm?mnarticle_uuid=710BF05A-D444-DED2-F8BF-2A76298460E0

Permanent pasture with deep rooting herbs will save the world.  Sequester carbon, provide high quality protein, and use minimal water, and fossil fuel.

And the inevitable excreta of the lambs also fertilises the soil.  So it’s a win-win.

win win win.  It's actually dairy cattle urine patches that are a problem... if you are trying to pick holes, use that one.  There are about 50% more dairy cattle here than people and they drink about 40L of water / day...
"Pull the goalie", Malcolm Gladwell.

Offline lucek

  • Not Enough Spare Time
  • **
  • Posts: 136
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2018, 07:27:57 AM »
Yes been emailing sgu for a decade and finally made it on the show. Ok wrong answer for a wtn but yeah.
You have the power, but. . .
Power is just energy over time and. . .
Energy is just the ability to do work.

Offline God Bomb

  • Seasoned Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 504
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2018, 03:25:19 PM »
Just two syllables in hectare(s).


I kept wondering what a "hectari" was. (as Steve said it)  I thought it was like 1000 hectares or something.
Fell deeds awake. Now for wrath, now for ruin, and the red dawn.

Offline DevoutCatalyst

  • Well Established
  • *****
  • Posts: 1571
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2018, 03:59:46 PM »
Glad someone showed up to hector him about that.

Offline brilligtove

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 7503
  • Ignorance can be cured. Stupidity, you deal with.
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2018, 04:55:17 PM »
Glad someone showed up to hector him about that.

I wondered if hector might be an old racist slur so I checked https://www.etymonline.com/word/hector:

hector (v.)
"to bluster, bully, domineer," 1650s, from slang hector (n.) "a blustering, turbulent, pervicacious, noisy fellow" [Johnson], 1650s, from Hector of the "Iliad," in reference to his encouragement of his fellow Trojans to keep up the fight. Earlier in English the name was used generically for "a valiant warrior" (late 14c.). Related: Hectored; hectoring.

Hector
masc. personal name, from Latinized form of Hektor, name of the Trojan hero, oldest son of Priam and Hecuba, in the "Iliad," from Greek hektor, literally "holder, stayer;" an agent noun from ekhein "to have, hold, possess" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold"). As a proper name it is rare in England but used in Scotland to render Gaelic Eachdonn. Heck for short.
evidence trumps experience | performance over perfection | responsibility – authority = scapegoat | emotions motivate; data doesn't

Offline fuzzyMarmot

  • Seasoned Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 683
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2018, 06:25:06 PM »
A few recent maps really help put land use in the U.S. in context:
https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2018-us-land-use/

A Texan like Cara should know the scale of rangeland in the U.S.!

Offline God Bomb

  • Seasoned Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 504
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2018, 09:18:42 PM »
Glad someone showed up to hector him about that.

I wondered if hector might be an old racist slur so I checked https://www.etymonline.com/word/hector:

hector (v.)
"to bluster, bully, domineer," 1650s, from slang hector (n.) "a blustering, turbulent, pervicacious, noisy fellow" [Johnson], 1650s, from Hector of the "Iliad," in reference to his encouragement of his fellow Trojans to keep up the fight. Earlier in English the name was used generically for "a valiant warrior" (late 14c.). Related: Hectored; hectoring.

Hector
masc. personal name, from Latinized form of Hektor, name of the Trojan hero, oldest son of Priam and Hecuba, in the "Iliad," from Greek hektor, literally "holder, stayer;" an agent noun from ekhein "to have, hold, possess" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold"). As a proper name it is rare in England but used in Scotland to render Gaelic Eachdonn. Heck for short.

you didn't know what hector meant (as a verb)?  Why did you think it might be racist?
Fell deeds awake. Now for wrath, now for ruin, and the red dawn.

Offline brilligtove

  • Too Much Spare Time
  • ********
  • Posts: 7503
  • Ignorance can be cured. Stupidity, you deal with.
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2018, 09:39:05 PM »
Glad someone showed up to hector him about that.

I wondered if hector might be an old racist slur so I checked https://www.etymonline.com/word/hector:

hector (v.)
"to bluster, bully, domineer," 1650s, from slang hector (n.) "a blustering, turbulent, pervicacious, noisy fellow" [Johnson], 1650s, from Hector of the "Iliad," in reference to his encouragement of his fellow Trojans to keep up the fight. Earlier in English the name was used generically for "a valiant warrior" (late 14c.). Related: Hectored; hectoring.

Hector
masc. personal name, from Latinized form of Hektor, name of the Trojan hero, oldest son of Priam and Hecuba, in the "Iliad," from Greek hektor, literally "holder, stayer;" an agent noun from ekhein "to have, hold, possess" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold"). As a proper name it is rare in England but used in Scotland to render Gaelic Eachdonn. Heck for short.

you didn't know what hector meant (as a verb)?  Why did you think it might be racist?

The thought went something like this:

I know the general meaning - badgering - but not the origin. There are a surprising number of words are namey-slurs, such as "gyp" and "Gypsy"... "Hector" is a name. Maybe a name of a culture? A belligerent people? <type>ety</type> google knows etymonline.com <type>ENTER</type> click search <type>hectorENTER</type> Oooh.
evidence trumps experience | performance over perfection | responsibility – authority = scapegoat | emotions motivate; data doesn't

Offline Ted Apelt

  • Off to a Start
  • *
  • Posts: 30
  • Group Organizer of Pasco Activists
    • Pasco Activists
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2018, 10:48:53 PM »
That Monsanto case...what a crock, folks.

"Pure glyphosate is low in toxicity, but products usually contain other ingredients that help the glyphosate get into the plants. The other ingredients in the product can make the product more toxic. Products containing glyphosate may cause eye or skin irritation. People who breathed in spray mist from products containing glyphosate felt irritation in their nose and throat. Swallowing products with glyphosate can cause increased saliva, burns in the mouth and throat, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Fatalities have been reported in cases of intentional ingestion."

http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/glyphogen.html

What I have heard about this case is that he was spraying massive quantities of this stuff over a period of many years, and there were times when the wind would cause him to be completely soaked in it on many different occasions.  Ihe amount of it and the long time frame needs to be taken into consideration here.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2018, 10:55:30 PM by Ted Apelt »
"Often, people cling all the harder to an idea precisely because the reality is so different and becoming more different."
Richard Wolff quoting his wife

Offline God Bomb

  • Seasoned Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 504
Re: Episode #684
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2018, 11:26:51 PM »

What I have heard about this case is that he was spraying massive quantities of this stuff over a period of many years, and there were times when the wind would cause him to be completely soaked in it on many different occasions.  Ihe amount of it and the long time frame needs to be taken into consideration here.

Is that within the guidelines they lay out for using the substance?  Seems more like a problem with unsafe working practices than the chemical itself.  Many of the chemicals I use day to day can be toxic if you get enough of them in the wrong parts of your body, but used correctly with PPE in the proper quantities and they are no issue.
Fell deeds awake. Now for wrath, now for ruin, and the red dawn.