Author Topic: Tofu pudding  (Read 1134 times)

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Online CarbShark

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2018, 05:00:26 PM »
  Chocolate by definition contains both cocoa and cocoa butter. Other ingredients by type. But if there's no cocoa, or there's no cocoa butter, it's not chocolate.

Where are you getting this definition? Certainly not from Cadbury. The British recipe of their Dairy Milk Chocolate Bar (and many other products) contains coconut oil rather than cocoa butter. (They don't use the same recipe for the versions made outside GB).

It's actually an interesting story. During WWI all the British soldiers were give a chocolate bar as part of their daily rations. But cocoa butter was needed for medical and other war uses, so the Cadbury recipe substituted coconut oil. Not only did no one complain, after the war they went back to their cocoa butter recipe and people complained about that.  They preferred the coconut oil over cocoa butter. They've made it with the same recipe until today (or at least the early 2000's when I read about all of this).

When the European Common Market was formed, and again when the European Union started, there were complaints and protests from Belgium, German, French, Swiss and other European Chocolatiers arguing that since Cadbury didn't have cocoa oil it couldn't be considered chocolate and would have to be marketed as chocolate foodstuff or something less appetizing. This was litigated several times and each time Cadbury won, because even though they didn't have cocoa butter they did have cocoa, and that qualified it as chocolate legally.

So yes, the EU chocolate makers want chocolate to be defined as cocoa and cocoa butter, but that's biased and suspect. The only purpose for doing that is to squeeze a competitor out of the market.

Also, White Chocolate is a thing. It's not chocolate, it's white chocolate.
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Offline Captain Video

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2018, 09:57:35 PM »
Quote
If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding! How can you have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?

Im willing to try Tofu pudding, I bet it provides a nice texture

I love Brussel sprouts, especially when roasted with salt pepper and olive oil (or lard and bacon >:D )  after roasting a quick stock (chicken or veg), balsamic vinegar, and/or wine glaze with caramelized onion, and dried cranberries to finish. Should be no bitterness at all even if you omit the glaze.

We have had the Chocolate discussion before, Im a Hershey man but Cadbury (Hershey in USA) and Cadbury Europe are pretty good too. Im often not fond of the Lindt type stuff either. A few expensive brands are good but no names come to mind. If you put it in front of me I will eat it regardless. A touch of chili powder is nice with good dark chocolate and mite be good in the pudding.


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Online CarbShark

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2018, 10:08:15 PM »
I've had a Lindt 99% bar.  Almost inedible.

So have I.  I had it in Germany this year, buying it at the chocolate museum in Cologne (the Germans seem to like having museums for strange single object subjects, such as the toy museum in Munich and the tea museum in Norden).  Actually, l liked it.  I think that chocolate should be bitter, not sweet, and the more bitter the better (to better go with my very bitter personality).  My favourite vegetables are Brussels sprouts, which are very bitter too.

If your palette is not sensitized to sugar, then you can tolerate and even enjoy bitter and sour foods that those who are sensitized to sugar cannot.

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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2018, 11:16:10 PM »
I've had a Lindt 99% bar.  Almost inedible.

So have I.  I had it in Germany this year, buying it at the chocolate museum in Cologne (the Germans seem to like having museums for strange single object subjects, such as the toy museum in Munich and the tea museum in Norden).  Actually, l liked it.  I think that chocolate should be bitter, not sweet, and the more bitter the better (to better go with my very bitter personality).  My favourite vegetables are Brussels sprouts, which are very bitter too.

If your palette is not sensitized to sugar, then you can tolerate and even enjoy bitter and sour foods that those who are sensitized to sugar cannot.

Well, you don’t sensitise to tastes, you get habituated to them.  You get used to the taste and come to like them.  I didn’t initially like Brussels sprouts finding them too bitter, but I quickly became used to them and came to love them.  I don’t personally like sweet tastes.  I like Brussels sprouts because it’s bitterness and crisp texture provide a nice contrast to the 8 other vegetables in include in my daily vegetable casserole (I get considerable variety in my diet in one bowl instead of over several days or a week).
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Online CarbShark

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2018, 10:21:55 AM »
I've had a Lindt 99% bar.  Almost inedible.

So have I.  I had it in Germany this year, buying it at the chocolate museum in Cologne (the Germans seem to like having museums for strange single object subjects, such as the toy museum in Munich and the tea museum in Norden).  Actually, l liked it.  I think that chocolate should be bitter, not sweet, and the more bitter the better (to better go with my very bitter personality).  My favourite vegetables are Brussels sprouts, which are very bitter too.

If your palette is not sensitized to sugar, then you can tolerate and even enjoy bitter and sour foods that those who are sensitized to sugar cannot.

Well, you don’t sensitise to tastes, you get habituated to them.  You get used to the taste and come to like them.  I didn’t initially like Brussels sprouts finding them too bitter, but I quickly became used to them and came to love them.  I don’t personally like sweet tastes.  I like Brussels sprouts because it’s bitterness and crisp texture provide a nice contrast to the 8 other vegetables in include in my daily vegetable casserole (I get considerable variety in my diet in one bowl instead of over several days or a week).

Actually, "sensitize" is the wrong word. I should have said:

If your palette has developed tolerance for sugar, then you can have and even enjoy bitter and sour foods that those who have not developed a tolerance for sugar cannot.

(But, yes, you can sensitize to, and develop tolerance for different tastes. It's kind of a basic of flavor chemistry. It's how people become wine (and chocolate) connoisseurs.)

and Donald Trump is President of the United States.

I'm not a doctor, I'm just someone who has done a ton of research into diet and nutrition.

Offline Captain Video

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2018, 08:47:14 PM »
If your brussels sprouts are bitter I think you are not cooking them correctly (unless you like them bitter I suppose) I thought they were horrible as a kid and my mom used to boil the shit out of them, something I would never do, but when looking for some evidence on why the different cooking technique produced different results to post here I found this article which claims farmers have bread out some of the bitterness over the last 20 years which I found interesting and may explain why they have become more popular.

https://www.chiceats.com/recipe/vegetarian-side/how-buy-cook-and-reduce-bitterness-brussels-sprouts

Quote
Over the last twenty years, farmers have mellowed the "unpleasant" flavor of Brussels sprouts by breeding a vegetable that contains fewer bitter compounds or glucosinolates. So, Brussels sprouts just taste better than they used to when we were kids. The rub is that glucosinolates help protect sprouts against pests. By improving the flavor, farmers are also lowering the plant's natural defenses.

Anyway by sautéing, grilling or roasting you can certainly reduce the bitterness and produce a little gem of joy.
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2018, 09:38:48 PM »
If your brussels sprouts are bitter I think you are not cooking them correctly (unless you like them bitter I suppose) I thought they were horrible as a kid and my mom used to boil the shit out of them, something I would never do, but when looking for some evidence on why the different cooking technique produced different results to post here I found this article which claims farmers have bread out some of the bitterness over the last 20 years which I found interesting and may explain why they have become more popular.

https://www.chiceats.com/recipe/vegetarian-side/how-buy-cook-and-reduce-bitterness-brussels-sprouts

Quote
Over the last twenty years, farmers have mellowed the "unpleasant" flavor of Brussels sprouts by breeding a vegetable that contains fewer bitter compounds or glucosinolates. So, Brussels sprouts just taste better than they used to when we were kids. The rub is that glucosinolates help protect sprouts against pests. By improving the flavor, farmers are also lowering the plant's natural defenses.

Anyway by sautéing, grilling or roasting you can certainly reduce the bitterness and produce a little gem of joy.

I like them bitter, the more bitter the better (as with chocolate, the bitter taste fits better with my bitter personality).  I like the contrast in taste and texture to the other items in my vegetable casserole. 

I microwave in cooking.  I used to have a conventional oven and a gas stovetop, but when I renovated the kitchen 20 years after originally building, I realised that I’d used neither in all that time (they were a nuisance, taking up space and just being another item to clean), so I got rid of them.

Microwave ovens are much more energy efficient and time saving.  I cook a meal in less than 8 minutes which doesn’t use much electricity in a 700 Watt oven.
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Offline arthwollipot

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2018, 09:43:14 PM »
Brussels Sprouts, like most vegetables, are at their very best immediately after cutting them from the stalk. If you haven't had them cooked fresh direct from the garden, then you are seriously missing out.
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Offline daniel1948

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2018, 09:51:50 PM »
Brussels Sprouts, like most vegetables, are at their very best immediately after cutting them from the stalk. If you haven't had them cooked fresh direct from the garden, then you are seriously missing out.

This applies to most vegetables. It's why I suffered through the miserable, back-breaking work of growing a huge garden for all those years when I lived in rural North Dakota. And it applies to veggies you cook and ones you eat fresh.

Back on topic, today I reduced the semi-sweet chocolate chips in my tofu pudding recipe to 2/3 of a cup, from a full cup, and it was an improvement. I like my chocolate to be very chocolate, but a whole cup was too much.
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Offline bachfiend

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Re: Tofu pudding
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2018, 08:07:00 PM »
Tofu pudding has become a staple food for me.  I’m eating it daily.  Recently, strawberries have been very cheap in Australia, so I’ve experimented with substituting or adding strawberries instead.  Strawberries result in the pudding become less firm, so it’s necessary to either cut down on the weight of the strawberries, or use hard instead of soft tofu.
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